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Community Article The Definitive Micro Computer Buying Guide — Micro Center Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker {$smarty.capture.menu} Activity Categories Discussions Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker Home › Reviews & Buying Guides The Definitive Micro Computer Buying Guide SeanM admin August 6 edited August 18 in Reviews & Buying Guides Written by Nick Beiderman Choosing a microcomputer board for a project can be a difficult task. Raspberry Pi alone offers a plethora of boards, each one having unique strengths and weaknesses based upon what you want to do with them. Then you get into Adafruit and Arduino’s microcontrollers and even more questions arise. But, before you reach choice paralysis, we’ve broken down 7 of the most common Raspberry Pi models (and take a quick detour to discuss Adafruit and Arduino), exploring what projects they excel at and what each board offers. We'll be taking a look at the Raspberry Pi 4 Model B The Raspberry Pi 4 Model B is the current flagship product from Raspberry Pi. This model features two USB 3.0 ports, two USB 2.0 ports, two Micro HDMI outputs, a 3.5mm audio jack, a gigabit Ethernet port, a USB-C port for power, a 40-pin header, and a camera input and display output. On the wireless side, the 4 Model B features WiFi and Bluetooth. The 4 Model B uses a Broadcom BCM2711 quad-core CPU, VideoCore VI GPU, and is available with 1, 2, 4, or 8GB RAM. For most uses, the 2 or 4GB model is a good balance of cost and performance. I’ve set up several 2 and 4GB models as servers for PLEX, PiHole, file sharing, and gaming. I keep an 8GB around for prototyping new projects. After I finish my prototype, I can check the RAM usage and buy a board that gives me the best performance at the best price.   Raspberry Pi Zero The Raspberry Pi Zero is physically smaller than Raspberry Pi’s other single board computers, consumes less power, and comes in three different styles. While all three have less processing power than standard Pi boards, the base Zero model does not have wireless connections, nor header pins. The Zero W adds Bluetooth and WiFi, and the Zero WH adds wireless connectivity and has pre-soldered headers. All three versions use a Broadcom BCM2835 Microprocessor, have 512 MB RAM, and have two Micro USB ports (one for power, one for connecting devices via USB OTG), a camera connector, a Mini HDMI port, and a 40-pin header. The Zero is great for low-power projects, like portable displays or remote monitoring. With a bit of web development knowledge, you can create a web interface for your projects. Add in a little ad-hoc networking and you can access your systems wirelessly in areas that don’t have WiFi. The price is low enough I like to use the Zero W for all my projects, though you can save a few dollars by using the non-wireless version. Some of my favorite projects that utilize a Raspberry Pi Zero include a timelapse camera and a PiPod music player. The PiPod is a small, portable music player based on the Raspberry Pi Zero (image from raspberrypi.org/blog/pipod-pi-zero-music-player) Raspberry Pi 3 Model B+ The previous flagship model, 3 Model B+, is still widely available. It’s less powerful than the 4 Model B with a Broadcom BCM2837B0 and 1GB RAM. It features four USB 2.0 ports, a full-size HDMI port, a 3.5mm audio jack, gigabit Ethernet, a 40-pin header, WiFi, and Bluetooth. Power is provided via a Micro USB port. This model is generally a few dollars cheaper than the 4 Model B. The 3 Model B+ can be used for a lot of the same projects as the 4 Model B. While I’ve migrated most of my 3 Model B+ projects to 4 Model Bs, I still control my 3D printer with OctoPi running on a 3 Model B+.   Raspberry Pi 3 Model A+ The 3 Model A+ falls in between the 3 Model B+ and the Zero. It uses the same Broadcom BCM2837BO as the 3 Model B+, but only has 512MB RAM. Connectivity is a bit more limited than other models, with only a single USB 2.0 port. Like the 3 Model B+, it features a full-size HDMI port, Micro USB for power, 3.5mm audio jack, camera, and display connectors, a 40-pin header, WiFi, and Bluetooth. However, it doesn’t have Ethernet networking, which makes it a better choice for some portable projects, like the PiGrrl, that benefit from the smaller size but don’t use much RAM. All of the models listed above feature a 40-pin header. 40-pin headers can be used to attach Hardware Attached on Top, or HATs, to expand functionality. Some of my favorite HATs include the POE HAT that allows me to power a Raspberry Pi via Ethernet, and Pimoroni’s Inky pHATs that add an eink display to the Pi. These pins can also be used as GPIO pins to control lights or relays, read inputs from buttons, switches, and other actuators, or provide connections via SPI and I2C. Raspberry Pi 400 The Raspberry Pi 4 Model B is also available in two unique form factors. First is the Pi 400. This all-in-one computer has the same form factor as the official Raspberry Pi keyboard but has a full computer built-in. On the back, there are three USB ports, a USB C port for power, two Micro HDMI ports, a 40-pin header, and gigabit Ethernet. This model is the perfect option for a micro desktop computer replacement, as it combines the computer and keyboard into one unit. All of the models listed above also feature a Micro SD card slot. The Micro SD card acts as the Raspberry Pi’s hard drive. It stores the operating system and any user files on the computer. Depending on the board, operating system, and system configuration, the Raspberry Pi can support cards up to 2TB. For most projects, I use 32GB cards as they tend to be the best bang for your buck, but I have used cards as big as 512GB for projects like my PiPod and PiGrrl. I frequently use Micro Center’s house brand cards for their excellent price and performance. The Raspberry Pi 400 is the perfect starting point for a clean, clutter free desk (Image from raspberrypi.org/products/raspberry-pi-400/) Raspberry Pi Compute Module 4 In addition to the 400, Raspberry Pi offers a compute module based on the 4 Model B. This version is sometimes referred to as the CM4 and is designed for use in embedded systems. The only connectivity is two high-density connectors on the bottom of the board. These connectors allow the CM4 to be connected to carrier boards to expand its functionality. The CM4 is great for projects that need specialized hardware controlled by a Raspberry Pi, such as the Gumstix flight controller for multirotor drones.  Raspberry Pi offers an IO board for the CM4, which is necessary for flashing the operating system to the internal memory. There are a total of 32 variations available, with a range of RAM and internal storage options, and with or without wireless connectivity. All of the models listed above are fully-fledged single board computers. They run a Linux-based operating system and are great replacements for low-power computers. They can be used for servers, desktops, and complex control systems. They’re able to run multiple programs concurrently, and can easily be connected to monitors, keyboards, or mice. But now we’re going to shift into microcontrollers. Microcontrollers run a single program that starts when they are powered on and stops when they are powered off. Microcontrollers don’t have an operating system and are great for simple control systems, like automated light control, watering plants, or logging environmental conditions. While microcontrollers often feature SPI, I2C, and other communication methods to connect peripheral hardware, GPOI pins are the bread and butter of microcontrollers. These pins can serve as outputs, providing a voltage (usually 3.3v or 5v), or inputs, detecting whether or not a voltage is present. Raspberry Pi Pico The Raspberry Pi Pico is Raspberry Pi’s first microcontroller. It features 26 GPIO pins (of which three may be used as analog inputs), 2xSPI, 2xI3C, 2xUART, a serial debug port, and 16 PWM channels. There’re 20 header pins on each side, for a total of 40 pins. The spacing of these pins allows the Pico to be mounted to a breadboard for rapid prototyping or soldered to perf board or strip board for more permanent projects. The pin holes are castellated, meaning they can be soldered directly to a PCB. This makes the Pico a great option for small scale production products. The Pico can run code written in MicroPython or C++, and can include low-level assembly code. This flexibility makes it great for everything from quick projects in Python to high-performance projects written with C++ and assembly. The Pico offers an excellent variety of inputs and outputs in a small package  While Raspberry Pi is one of the best-known names in the hobby board market, other companies like Arduino and Adafruit also produce well-known microcontrollers. Like the Raspberry Pi Pico, they run a single piece of code in a loop until they are powered off. This makes them great for simple projects like control or monitoring systems. They’re not well suited for servers, desktops, or other roles that require a more traditional computer with an operating system. While the Pico can generally be used in the same applications as boards from Adafruit and others, it’s not always the best choice. Depending on the project, you may need a board with more input and output pins. For very small or low-power projects, a smaller board might be a better fit. Since the Pico is fairly new, some ecosystems like Adafruit’s Feather line have a larger variety of peripheral accessories available than the Pico. Adafruit’s Feather ecosystem offers numerous mainboards and expansion “wings” (image from learn.adafruit.com/adafruit-feather)  Now that you’ve got a handle on what each board is and what it does, you’re ready to start digging into the world of Pi! If you’re still not sure what board is right for you, start by asking yourself if a microcomputer or a microcontroller is right for your project. Single-board computers are larger and generally have higher power consumption, processing power, and cost. If you choose a microcontroller you’ll also want to consider the language you’ll be programming in, the number of pins, and available peripheral accessories. There’s no “one size fits all” board, but now you should be able to go out and choose the board that’s right for you.   More from the Micro Center Community: Looking for more information about Raspberry Pi? We’ve got a Hobby Board section of the community, as well as Hobby Board guides like How to use a Wyze Cam V2 as a Webcam, Raspberry Pi Basics, and Using the Raspberry Pi Pico. And if you can’t find what you’re looking for, don’t hesitate to post a new discussion and the Community will be happy to help! 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Leave a Comment Rich Text Editor. To edit a paragraph's style, hit tab to get to the paragraph menu. From there you will be able to pick one style. Nothing defaults to paragraph. An inline formatting menu will show up when you select text. Hit tab to get into that menu. Some elements, such as rich link embeds, images, loading indicators, and error messages may get inserted into the editor. 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Categories 6.5K All Categories 992 The Blog 30 What's Trending 155 How to & Technical Guides 8 Computer Hardware 118 Software 3 Home Office 5 Networking Audio/Visual 1 Home Automation 15 3D Printers 5 Maker 14 PC Build Guides 76 Reviews & Buying Guides 23 Build Showcase 11 Contests 33 Past Contests 697 The Community 1.7K General Discussion 101 New Members 61 Consumer Tech 15 Prebuilt PCs and Laptops 71 Software 2 Audio/Visual 11 Networking & Security 1 Home Automation 2 Digital Photography 3 Content Creators 21 Hobby Boards & Projects 22 3D Printing 45 Retro Arcade/Gaming 77 All Other Tech 1.2K Store Information and Policy 46 Off Topic 5 Community Ideas & Feedback 109 Your Completed Builds 2.6K Build-Your-Own PC 1.6K Help Choosing Parts 217 Graphics Cards 157 CPUs, Memory, and Motherboards 61 Cases and Power Supplies 19 Air and Liquid Cooling 11 Monitors and Displays 28 Peripherals 6 All Other Parts 17 Featured Categories We love seeing what our customers build Submit photos and a description of your PC to our build showcase Submit Now Looking for a little inspiration? See other custom PC builds and get some ideas for what can be done View Build Showcase View builds by: AMD Processors Intel Processors RTX 3090 RTX 3080 RTX 2080 Ti RTX 2080 Super RTX 2070 Super RTX 2070 RTX 2060 Super Radeon RX 5700XT Radeon RX 5700 Air Cooled Liquid Cooled SAME DAY CUSTOM BUILD SERVICE If You Can Dream it, We Can Build it. Services starting at $149.99 More Details Micro Center Homepage Desktops Laptops Computer Parts Computer Accessories Custom PC Builder Build Showcase Networking Electronics 3D Printing Service, Upgrades & Repairs Laptop Battery Replacement Laptop Screen Repair Virus and Malware Removal Hard Drive Recovery and Backup Apple MacBook Repair Custom Built PCs Schedule an Appointment © Vanilla Foundation Theme 2021 Powered By Vanilla Community Article Empty Atari Card — Micro Center Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker {$smarty.capture.menu} Activity Categories Discussions Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker Home › Consumer Tech › Retro Arcade/Gaming Empty Atari Card fl3030 ✭ January 18 in Retro Arcade/Gaming I recently bought the Atari kit and the memory card just boots to the Raspian Desktop, no retropie and no games that I can find. The store told me they all do that and there is a process you have have to do but didn't tell me what that is, they just said to follow the book. The book doesn't match up. Can anyone help out before I go ask for my money back? 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Comments TS_EmileC admin January 18 Hello @fl3030. I've sent you an email regarding your SD card for the Atari Kit. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook fl3030 ✭ January 19 Thank you, I replied with the order number. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Glowdoc1 ✭ February 6 I just bought the Atari SD card and it will not install anything! 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Ian admin February 6 Glowdoc1 said: I just bought the Atari SD card and it will not install anything! Hello, are you receiving an error message or what is it that you are seeing?  0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Glowdoc1 ✭ February 7 The card is blank! Does not boot! 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook TSMikeW admin February 7 @Glowdoc1 I've created a support ticket for you. We will be in touch shortly. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook beemerbob ✭ February 26 I purchased an Atari microSD on Feb 22, 2021 (order - 191-PO-8315271) and it is blank. The Raspberry Pi 3+ works fine but when I boot with the Atari microSD i get a blank screen. I then looked at the microSD and it is blank. Please help! 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook NickBiederman admin February 26 @beemerbob I'll send you a DM. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Categories 6.5K All Categories 994 The Blog 32 What's Trending 155 How to & Technical Guides 8 Computer Hardware 118 Software 3 Home Office 5 Networking Audio/Visual 1 Home Automation 15 3D Printers 5 Maker 14 PC Build Guides 76 Reviews & Buying Guides 23 Build Showcase 11 Contests 33 Past Contests 702 The Community 1.7K General Discussion 103 New Members 61 Consumer Tech 15 Prebuilt PCs and Laptops 71 Software 2 Audio/Visual 11 Networking & Security 1 Home Automation 2 Digital Photography 3 Content Creators 21 Hobby Boards & Projects 22 3D Printing 45 Retro Arcade/Gaming 77 All Other Tech 1.2K Store Information and Policy 46 Off Topic 5 Community Ideas & Feedback 109 Your Completed Builds 2.6K Build-Your-Own PC 1.6K Help Choosing Parts 217 Graphics Cards 157 CPUs, Memory, and Motherboards 61 Cases and Power Supplies 19 Air and Liquid Cooling 11 Monitors and Displays 33 Peripherals 6 All Other Parts 17 Featured Categories We love seeing what our customers build Submit photos and a description of your PC to our build showcase Submit Now Looking for a little inspiration? See other custom PC builds and get some ideas for what can be done View Build Showcase View builds by: AMD Processors Intel Processors RTX 3090 RTX 3080 RTX 2080 Ti RTX 2080 Super RTX 2070 Super RTX 2070 RTX 2060 Super Radeon RX 5700XT Radeon RX 5700 Air Cooled Liquid Cooled SAME DAY CUSTOM BUILD SERVICE If You Can Dream it, We Can Build it. Services starting at $149.99 More Details Micro Center Homepage Desktops Laptops Computer Parts Computer Accessories Custom PC Builder Build Showcase Networking Electronics 3D Printing Service, Upgrades & Repairs Laptop Battery Replacement Laptop Screen Repair Virus and Malware Removal Hard Drive Recovery and Backup Apple MacBook Repair Custom Built PCs Schedule an Appointment © Vanilla Foundation Theme 2021 Powered By Vanilla Community Article Overcharged and double charged — Micro Center Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker {$smarty.capture.menu} Activity Categories Discussions Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker Home › Store Information and Policy Overcharged and double charged StandardJoe ✭ November 2020 in Store Information and Policy I was going through some receipts and I noticed a few things. First, on 9/29/20 I purchased an Intel i9 10850k. It was $399.99, but I got charged 449.99. Second, on 3/25/18 I was charged twice for the Mastercase Pro 5.  0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Comments LandShark admin November 2020 Hello, @StandardJoe! I was able to find the purchase you are referring to, and I confirmed that $449.99 was the price of the Intel i9 10850k at that time (9/29/20). I was also able to find the transaction where you were charged twice for the MasterCase Pro 5, and I do see that we processed a refund at that time. (03/25/2018 05:26 PM) I hope this information helps! Please let me know if there is any further info I can provide. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook StandardJoe ✭ November 2020 Ok thank you for the help 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook vaf513 ✭ February 6 Hi my name is Vincent. I have an issue. I just returned from your Paterson NJ store and realized on my receipt that I was overcharged by 10 dollars. I purchased 2 identical Raspberry Pi 3 B pluses.   I was charged 24.99 for one of them and charged 34.99 for the other.   Reference # 075 P0 6626291       I would appreciate a reply and a correction.  Never had issues in any of your stores. Personnel are always courteous and friendly.  Im sure this is an isolated issue.  0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook TSKyleH admin February 6 vaf513 said: Hi my name is Vincent. I have an issue. I just returned from your Paterson NJ store and realized on my receipt that I was overcharged by 10 dollars. I purchased 2 identical Raspberry Pi 3 B pluses.   I was charged 24.99 for one of them and charged 34.99 for the other.   Reference # 075 P0 6626291       I would appreciate a reply and a correction.  Never had issues in any of your stores. Personnel are always courteous and friendly.  Im sure this is an isolated issue.  Thank you for the reference number, the price for the pi 3 operates on a tiered pricing system, https://www.microcenter.com/product/505170/allied-electronics-raspberry-pi-3-model-b. 1 is 24.99, however for the 2nd one and any amount of to 10, would be 34.99 each. The final tier is for the 11th pi on the purchase starting at 39.99. I am sorry for the confusion this may have caused. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Jobama_x ✭ February 6 Hi I came in today for a pick up. I bought the FRACTAL MESHIFY C WHITE TG MT ATX case. I only bought one but after I received the online receipt it showed that I was charged for two when I only got one. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook TSKyleH admin February 6 Jobama_x said: Hi I came in today for a pick up. I bought the FRACTAL MESHIFY C WHITE TG MT ATX case. I only bought one but after I received the online receipt it showed that I was charged for two when I only got one. I have created a ticket for this, you will be getting an email requesting some additional information so we can look into this for you. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Categories 6.5K All Categories 994 The Blog 32 What's Trending 155 How to & Technical Guides 8 Computer Hardware 118 Software 3 Home Office 5 Networking Audio/Visual 1 Home Automation 15 3D Printers 5 Maker 14 PC Build Guides 76 Reviews & Buying Guides 23 Build Showcase 11 Contests 33 Past Contests 702 The Community 1.7K General Discussion 103 New Members 61 Consumer Tech 15 Prebuilt PCs and Laptops 71 Software 2 Audio/Visual 11 Networking & Security 1 Home Automation 2 Digital Photography 3 Content Creators 21 Hobby Boards & Projects 22 3D Printing 45 Retro Arcade/Gaming 77 All Other Tech 1.2K Store Information and Policy 46 Off Topic 5 Community Ideas & Feedback 109 Your Completed Builds 2.6K Build-Your-Own PC 1.6K Help Choosing Parts 217 Graphics Cards 157 CPUs, Memory, and Motherboards 61 Cases and Power Supplies 19 Air and Liquid Cooling 11 Monitors and Displays 33 Peripherals 6 All Other Parts 17 Featured Categories We love seeing what our customers build Submit photos and a description of your PC to our build showcase Submit Now Looking for a little inspiration? See other custom PC builds and get some ideas for what can be done View Build Showcase View builds by: AMD Processors Intel Processors RTX 3090 RTX 3080 RTX 2080 Ti RTX 2080 Super RTX 2070 Super RTX 2070 RTX 2060 Super Radeon RX 5700XT Radeon RX 5700 Air Cooled Liquid Cooled SAME DAY CUSTOM BUILD SERVICE If You Can Dream it, We Can Build it. Services starting at $149.99 More Details Micro Center Homepage Desktops Laptops Computer Parts Computer Accessories Custom PC Builder Build Showcase Networking Electronics 3D Printing Service, Upgrades & Repairs Laptop Battery Replacement Laptop Screen Repair Virus and Malware Removal Hard Drive Recovery and Backup Apple MacBook Repair Custom Built PCs Schedule an Appointment © Vanilla Foundation Theme 2021 Powered By Vanilla Community Article New Atari themed retro arcade graphics are now available — Micro Center Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker {$smarty.capture.menu} Activity Categories Discussions Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker Home › Consumer Tech › Retro Arcade/Gaming New Atari themed retro arcade graphics are now available NickBiederman admin October 2020 edited November 2020 in Retro Arcade/Gaming We have a series of new Atari themed graphics for our retro arcade cabinets that are available now. These graphics are fully licensed form Atari and feature logos from classic games like Asteroids, Millipede, and Breakout. These high quality vinyl graphics are available for the Bartop, ¾, and Full size cabinets, Fight Stick and Fight Stick with trackball, and Bartop and Fight Stick stands. No matter which size you choose we offer Atari themed graphics to match. All our cabinets use the same internals. We carry high quality arcade buttons and joysticks in a number of colors and switches with several options for actuation weight. We also carry T molding in several colors to give a finished look to your build. We offer LED illuminated buttons and RGB illuminated T molding if you want to add a bit of light to your build. All our arcade cabinets and fight sticks use the same XinMo USB controller. A version of the controller with support for LED illuminated buttons is also available.   Our all-in-one cabinets are designed to use a Raspberry Pi 3 model B+ for emulation of classic arcade games and home consoles. Our Fight Sticks are available as a USB controller that can be connected to a PC, Raspberry Pi, or other system, or with a Raspberry Pi built in so you just need to connect power and a screen.   In addition to preassembled Fight Sticks, we also offer complete arcade cabinet kits. These kits include the cabinet, graphics, screen, and internals. If you’d like to build your own cabinet from scratch, check out our Retro Arcade Builder for help picking parts. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Comments NickBiederman admin October 2020 edited November 2020 Here’s a rundown of the 8 options we currently for Retro Gaming systems have: Dual Fight Sticks Fight Sticks do not include a screen. We offer a Fight Stick Stand if you want a stand- up gaming experience. Like our all-in-one cabinets, these Fight Sticks feature controls for 2 players. These are available preassembled or as a bare cabinet you can add your own buttons, joysticks, and other components to.  Fight Stick USB This is our most basic controller. It can be connected to a PC, Raspberry Pi, or other system and is great for users who already have an emulation setup but are still looking for the classic arcade feel. Fight Stick with Trackball USB This controller is a bit of an upgrade from the non- trackball version above. It includes a trackball for games like Crystal Castles. It’s slightly larger than the non- trackball version, and can be connected to a PC, Raspberry Pi, or other system. Ultimate Fight Stick This model is aesthetically identical to the USB Fight Stick, but contains a Raspberry Pi and our Atari Games Card with over 140 licensed Atari games. You just need to connect a screen and power to complete this setup. Ultimate Fight Stick with Trackball This model is aesthetically identical to the USB Fight Stick with Trackball, but contains a Raspberry Pi and our Atari Games Card with over 140 licensed Atari games. You just need to connect a screen and power to complete this setup. All-In-One Cabinets These cabinets all contain a screen, Raspberry Pi 3 model B+, and our Atari Games SD Card preloaded with over 140 licensed Atari games. They're great for retro gamers looking for a dedicated system with a classic arcade feel. All sizes are available as an all-in-one kit or as a bare cabinet you can customize with your own selection of buttons, joysticks, and other parts.  Bartop This is our smallest cabinet. It features a 21” screen and can be set on a counter or table. If you’re looking for a small, all-in-one standup gaming experience you can pair this with our Bartop stand. 3/4 Size For many people this is the “goldilocks” cabinet. It’s a stand up cabinet with a 27” screen. It’s a great option for people looking for something that’s a little larger than the Bartop but don’t have space for a full size. Full Size This is our largest cabinet. It’s ideal for 2 player games as the larger control panel gives each player more room. It’s also the only all-in-one cabinet compatible with a trackball control panel. This lets you add a trackball for classic arcade games like Crystal Castles. It features our largest screen at 32". Atari Pi Kit This is our lowest priced retro gaming system. It comes with a Raspberry Pi 3 model B+, Atari games SD card preloaded with over 140 licensed Atari games, a USB gamepad, Atari themes Raspberry Pi case, and all the cables needed to power the kit and connect it to a monitor. It’s perfect for casual gamers who don’t want to dedicate the space to a cabinet or fight stick but still want a good introduction to retro gaming emulation. 1 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Categories 6.5K All Categories 992 The Blog 30 What's Trending 155 How to & Technical Guides 8 Computer Hardware 118 Software 3 Home Office 5 Networking Audio/Visual 1 Home Automation 15 3D Printers 5 Maker 14 PC Build Guides 76 Reviews & Buying Guides 23 Build Showcase 11 Contests 33 Past Contests 697 The Community 1.7K General Discussion 101 New Members 61 Consumer Tech 15 Prebuilt PCs and Laptops 71 Software 2 Audio/Visual 11 Networking & Security 1 Home Automation 2 Digital Photography 3 Content Creators 21 Hobby Boards & Projects 22 3D Printing 45 Retro Arcade/Gaming 77 All Other Tech 1.2K Store Information and Policy 46 Off Topic 5 Community Ideas & Feedback 109 Your Completed Builds 2.6K Build-Your-Own PC 1.6K Help Choosing Parts 217 Graphics Cards 157 CPUs, Memory, and Motherboards 61 Cases and Power Supplies 19 Air and Liquid Cooling 11 Monitors and Displays 28 Peripherals 6 All Other Parts 17 Featured Categories We love seeing what our customers build Submit photos and a description of your PC to our build showcase Submit Now Looking for a little inspiration? See other custom PC builds and get some ideas for what can be done View Build Showcase View builds by: AMD Processors Intel Processors RTX 3090 RTX 3080 RTX 2080 Ti RTX 2080 Super RTX 2070 Super RTX 2070 RTX 2060 Super Radeon RX 5700XT Radeon RX 5700 Air Cooled Liquid Cooled SAME DAY CUSTOM BUILD SERVICE If You Can Dream it, We Can Build it. Services starting at $149.99 More Details Micro Center Homepage Desktops Laptops Computer Parts Computer Accessories Custom PC Builder Build Showcase Networking Electronics 3D Printing Service, Upgrades & Repairs Laptop Battery Replacement Laptop Screen Repair Virus and Malware Removal Hard Drive Recovery and Backup Apple MacBook Repair Custom Built PCs Schedule an Appointment © Vanilla Foundation Theme 2021 Powered By Vanilla Community Article Atari iBoost 32gb - Black Screen with booting from Pi 4 and Pi400 — Micro Center Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker {$smarty.capture.menu} Activity Categories Discussions Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker Home › Consumer Tech › Retro Arcade/Gaming Atari iBoost 32gb - Black Screen with booting from Pi 4 and Pi400 jwpereira ✭ January 23 in Retro Arcade/Gaming Unable to boot on Pi 4 4gb. Tried on Pi400 and I get a boot loader with error 00000044. Please help. Thanks! 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Comments jwpereira ✭ January 23 Just want to add Raspbian boots fine on my other SD Card. When I insert the SD card on my Mac is can see a recovery partition. Perhaps the card is corrupted? 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook jwpereira ✭ January 26 Picked up a Pi 3b Plus and it worked fine. SD Card must not be compatible with Pi 4.  0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook ninja502 ky ✭ January 26 yes the atari 32gb card is only for Raspberry Pi 3/3B+/3A+ 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Categories 6.5K All Categories 994 The Blog 32 What's Trending 155 How to & Technical Guides 8 Computer Hardware 118 Software 3 Home Office 5 Networking Audio/Visual 1 Home Automation 15 3D Printers 5 Maker 14 PC Build Guides 76 Reviews & Buying Guides 23 Build Showcase 11 Contests 33 Past Contests 702 The Community 1.7K General Discussion 103 New Members 61 Consumer Tech 15 Prebuilt PCs and Laptops 71 Software 2 Audio/Visual 11 Networking & Security 1 Home Automation 2 Digital Photography 3 Content Creators 21 Hobby Boards & Projects 22 3D Printing 45 Retro Arcade/Gaming 77 All Other Tech 1.2K Store Information and Policy 46 Off Topic 5 Community Ideas & Feedback 109 Your Completed Builds 2.6K Build-Your-Own PC 1.6K Help Choosing Parts 217 Graphics Cards 157 CPUs, Memory, and Motherboards 61 Cases and Power Supplies 19 Air and Liquid Cooling 11 Monitors and Displays 33 Peripherals 6 All Other Parts 17 Featured Categories We love seeing what our customers build Submit photos and a description of your PC to our build showcase Submit Now Looking for a little inspiration? See other custom PC builds and get some ideas for what can be done View Build Showcase View builds by: AMD Processors Intel Processors RTX 3090 RTX 3080 RTX 2080 Ti RTX 2080 Super RTX 2070 Super RTX 2070 RTX 2060 Super Radeon RX 5700XT Radeon RX 5700 Air Cooled Liquid Cooled SAME DAY CUSTOM BUILD SERVICE If You Can Dream it, We Can Build it. Services starting at $149.99 More Details Micro Center Homepage Desktops Laptops Computer Parts Computer Accessories Custom PC Builder Build Showcase Networking Electronics 3D Printing Service, Upgrades & Repairs Laptop Battery Replacement Laptop Screen Repair Virus and Malware Removal Hard Drive Recovery and Backup Apple MacBook Repair Custom Built PCs Schedule an Appointment © Vanilla Foundation Theme 2021 Powered By Vanilla Community Article Atari fight stick cabinet kit — Micro Center Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker {$smarty.capture.menu} Activity Categories Discussions Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker Home › Consumer Tech › Retro Arcade/Gaming Atari fight stick cabinet kit Sketch2k278 ✭ May 9 in Retro Arcade/Gaming Ok, I have a question... I have both Atari fight stick with trackball and one without trackball both with a raspberry pi 3/4. I'd love to get the arcade cabinet for both of them but sadly I no longer live near the micro center that sells them and sadly they don't ship them. Have anyone else had this issue with these and if so is there an alternative arcade cabinet kit that I can purchase that will fit these arcade sticks?  0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Comments Ian admin May 10 Greetings, I am sorry, these are only available in-store, I am not sure if we will ship these at a later time. We are not aware of any alternative products. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Categories 6.5K All Categories 994 The Blog 32 What's Trending 155 How to & Technical Guides 8 Computer Hardware 118 Software 3 Home Office 5 Networking Audio/Visual 1 Home Automation 15 3D Printers 5 Maker 14 PC Build Guides 76 Reviews & Buying Guides 23 Build Showcase 11 Contests 33 Past Contests 702 The Community 1.7K General Discussion 103 New Members 61 Consumer Tech 15 Prebuilt PCs and Laptops 71 Software 2 Audio/Visual 11 Networking & Security 1 Home Automation 2 Digital Photography 3 Content Creators 21 Hobby Boards & Projects 22 3D Printing 45 Retro Arcade/Gaming 77 All Other Tech 1.2K Store Information and Policy 46 Off Topic 5 Community Ideas & Feedback 109 Your Completed Builds 2.6K Build-Your-Own PC 1.6K Help Choosing Parts 217 Graphics Cards 157 CPUs, Memory, and Motherboards 61 Cases and Power Supplies 19 Air and Liquid Cooling 11 Monitors and Displays 33 Peripherals 6 All Other Parts 17 Featured Categories We love seeing what our customers build Submit photos and a description of your PC to our build showcase Submit Now Looking for a little inspiration? See other custom PC builds and get some ideas for what can be done View Build Showcase View builds by: AMD Processors Intel Processors RTX 3090 RTX 3080 RTX 2080 Ti RTX 2080 Super RTX 2070 Super RTX 2070 RTX 2060 Super Radeon RX 5700XT Radeon RX 5700 Air Cooled Liquid Cooled SAME DAY CUSTOM BUILD SERVICE If You Can Dream it, We Can Build it. Services starting at $149.99 More Details Micro Center Homepage Desktops Laptops Computer Parts Computer Accessories Custom PC Builder Build Showcase Networking Electronics 3D Printing Service, Upgrades & Repairs Laptop Battery Replacement Laptop Screen Repair Virus and Malware Removal Hard Drive Recovery and Backup Apple MacBook Repair Custom Built PCs Schedule an Appointment © Vanilla Foundation Theme 2021 Powered By Vanilla Community Article Atari SD Card - Configuring the USB gamepad — Micro Center Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker {$smarty.capture.menu} Activity Categories Discussions Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker Home › Featured Categories › Gaming Atari SD Card - Configuring the USB gamepad Jon1999 ✭ July 14 in Gaming I have the Atari 32GB Micro SD (SKU# 163683) and cannot get the USB gamepad to work correctly. I have tried the Vilros Retro gamepad (same gamepad inside Atari Pi Kit, SKU# 115931) and the Logitech Gamepad F310. The gamepad buttons do not work correctly and I have tried multiple times to configure them. I am new to the Raspberry Pi 3 and the reviews made it sound so simple to use (plug and play). I am apparently missing configuration steps. Do I need to install some other drivers? 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Best Answer Ian admin July 15 Accepted Answer https://community.microcenter.com/discussion/8887/atari-sd-card-configuring-the-usb-gamepad Greetings, I would look over the RetroPi website, there is tons of setup and troubleshooting information listed! https://retropie.org.uk/docs/ 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Categories 6.5K All Categories 992 The Blog 30 What's Trending 155 How to & Technical Guides 8 Computer Hardware 118 Software 3 Home Office 5 Networking Audio/Visual 1 Home Automation 15 3D Printers 5 Maker 14 PC Build Guides 76 Reviews & Buying Guides 23 Build Showcase 11 Contests 33 Past Contests 697 The Community 1.7K General Discussion 101 New Members 61 Consumer Tech 15 Prebuilt PCs and Laptops 71 Software 2 Audio/Visual 11 Networking & Security 1 Home Automation 2 Digital Photography 3 Content Creators 21 Hobby Boards & Projects 22 3D Printing 45 Retro Arcade/Gaming 77 All Other Tech 1.2K Store Information and Policy 46 Off Topic 5 Community Ideas & Feedback 109 Your Completed Builds 2.6K Build-Your-Own PC 1.6K Help Choosing Parts 217 Graphics Cards 157 CPUs, Memory, and Motherboards 61 Cases and Power Supplies 19 Air and Liquid Cooling 11 Monitors and Displays 28 Peripherals 6 All Other Parts 17 Featured Categories We love seeing what our customers build Submit photos and a description of your PC to our build showcase Submit Now Looking for a little inspiration? See other custom PC builds and get some ideas for what can be done View Build Showcase View builds by: AMD Processors Intel Processors RTX 3090 RTX 3080 RTX 2080 Ti RTX 2080 Super RTX 2070 Super RTX 2070 RTX 2060 Super Radeon RX 5700XT Radeon RX 5700 Air Cooled Liquid Cooled SAME DAY CUSTOM BUILD SERVICE If You Can Dream it, We Can Build it. Services starting at $149.99 More Details Micro Center Homepage Desktops Laptops Computer Parts Computer Accessories Custom PC Builder Build Showcase Networking Electronics 3D Printing Service, Upgrades & Repairs Laptop Battery Replacement Laptop Screen Repair Virus and Malware Removal Hard Drive Recovery and Backup Apple MacBook Repair Custom Built PCs Schedule an Appointment © Vanilla Foundation Theme 2021 Powered By Vanilla Community Article New Retropie image for Atari SD Card — Micro Center Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker {$smarty.capture.menu} Activity Categories Discussions Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker Home › Consumer Tech › Retro Arcade/Gaming New Retropie image for Atari SD Card NickBiederman admin December 2020 edited February 26 in Retro Arcade/Gaming On 2/25/21 we identified a major issue with this image and have rolled back to the previous version. We are working to resolve this issue and will update this post when the new image is live again. We just published a new version of the Retropie image for Raspberry Pi 3 model B+ distributed on our Atari SD Card. You can install this new image by following the instructions in this post. Changes: 1. Support for Trooper II included. Input no longer needs to be configured for the Trooper II- It's now plug and play. 2. Trackball/Spinner sensitivity has been increased. 3. New custom theme selected by default. A new theme, named "MC", is included in this version of the image. It's a simple, dark, flat theme. Screenshots of multiple views and systems can be found below. Carbon is still installed, and additional themes can still be downloaded from the Retropie menu. Information on themes for Retropie can be found here. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Comments Draugr ✭ February 17 edited February 17 I like the look of the above theme. Is this the new update from December 2020, or is the theme shown above the original theme when the 32GB Atari MicroSD card was released? Also, can you add more games to the installation? I have all or most of the Atari 2600 games on hand and wanted to know if this Atari image using Retropie is the same as using a standard Retropie image where you can FTP in and install additional games and screen/boxart. I hope I can add more 2600, 5200, and 7800 games to the image myself. Any info is appreciated. Thanks. PS: Is it possible to get this theme without the Atari MicroSD card or can you copy the theme from the MicroSD card to another Retro Pie installation? I'm asking in case there is some reason that you can't install more games to the official Atari image. If that is the case, I'd love to be able to use the theme on a fresh Retro Pie install and then add my own games to it. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook NickBiederman admin February 17 edited February 17 @Draugr The new image with this theme and the other changes just went live last week. I wrote this post back in December I finalized the changes, but didn't make it publicly visible until the update was released. If you already have an Atari SD card you can install the new image by following the instructions here. You can add additional games/systems using the same methods used for RetroPie including FTP. This link describes a few methods you can use. You can extract the theme from the after installing the image. If I remember correctly it's stored in  /home/pi/.emulationstation/themes/mc. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook LDude ✭ March 24 Hi - checking is the issue found on 2/25/21 was resolved? Also, I'm happy to do some testing if that's what's needed to get the new image posted. Thanks for all your updates! 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook TSTDavey admin March 24 @LDude just chiming in. Are you having issues with your image? We can send you out another SD card. I'll just need your reference number off your receipt. If you don't have it let us know, we'll try another way to get the information we need. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook LDude ✭ March 24 @TSTDavey - I'm not having issues. I have an older image and was trying to upgrade to the latest. I appreciate you checking in. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook LDude ✭ April 25 Hi - just checking in to see if there's an updated image, or if I can help, for example, in testing a new image. Thanks 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Categories 6.5K All Categories 994 The Blog 32 What's Trending 155 How to & Technical Guides 8 Computer Hardware 118 Software 3 Home Office 5 Networking Audio/Visual 1 Home Automation 15 3D Printers 5 Maker 14 PC Build Guides 76 Reviews & Buying Guides 23 Build Showcase 11 Contests 33 Past Contests 702 The Community 1.7K General Discussion 103 New Members 61 Consumer Tech 15 Prebuilt PCs and Laptops 71 Software 2 Audio/Visual 11 Networking & Security 1 Home Automation 2 Digital Photography 3 Content Creators 21 Hobby Boards & Projects 22 3D Printing 45 Retro Arcade/Gaming 77 All Other Tech 1.2K Store Information and Policy 46 Off Topic 5 Community Ideas & Feedback 109 Your Completed Builds 2.6K Build-Your-Own PC 1.6K Help Choosing Parts 217 Graphics Cards 157 CPUs, Memory, and Motherboards 61 Cases and Power Supplies 19 Air and Liquid Cooling 11 Monitors and Displays 33 Peripherals 6 All Other Parts 17 Featured Categories We love seeing what our customers build Submit photos and a description of your PC to our build showcase Submit Now Looking for a little inspiration? See other custom PC builds and get some ideas for what can be done View Build Showcase View builds by: AMD Processors Intel Processors RTX 3090 RTX 3080 RTX 2080 Ti RTX 2080 Super RTX 2070 Super RTX 2070 RTX 2060 Super Radeon RX 5700XT Radeon RX 5700 Air Cooled Liquid Cooled SAME DAY CUSTOM BUILD SERVICE If You Can Dream it, We Can Build it. Services starting at $149.99 More Details Micro Center Homepage Desktops Laptops Computer Parts Computer Accessories Custom PC Builder Build Showcase Networking Electronics 3D Printing Service, Upgrades & Repairs Laptop Battery Replacement Laptop Screen Repair Virus and Malware Removal Hard Drive Recovery and Backup Apple MacBook Repair Custom Built PCs Schedule an Appointment © Vanilla Foundation Theme 2021 Powered By Vanilla Community Article Installing the latest RetroPie image with the Atari Games Card - Page 2 — Micro Center Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker {$smarty.capture.menu} Activity Categories Discussions Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker Home › Consumer Tech › Retro Arcade/Gaming Installing the latest RetroPie image with the Atari Games Card «12» Comments Kodos ✭ January 29 @LandShark @NickBiederman Any possible help here? Pi Zero didn't work which is ok since I had a more appropriate use for it. I was going to get the Pi 3B but was talked into the 2GB 4B since it was the same price but after over $100 spent in various parts over two trips to Micro Center I still can't use the card. I did get the RetroPie.org version installed and running to make sure everything worked but that of course has no ROMS. I have my Trooper 2 controller all configured and I am longingly looking to use it. I'm getting good at etching images at least having made several different boot cards to do different things.  0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook NickBiederman admin January 29 @Kodos At this time the image is only compatible with Raspberry Pi 3B/3B+/3A+. We're working on a Pi 4 version, but it's not ready yet. I think the card is returnable, but I'm not 100% sure on that. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Slacker55 ✭ February 2 edited February 2 I purchased the Atari Fightstick with the 32GBAtari card and while I can get it to properly boot up and play the games, the problem that I am having is with the pre-installed version of Retropie.  When I tried to update it using the Retropie interface, I get a message stating that the version of Retropie that I have installed is based on Rasbian Stretch and is no longer supported.  It recommends that I install the latest Retropie image.   I think that I know how to do this from the Retropie site, but if I flash a new image to the Atari card, will it erase the pre-instaleld games?  How do I properly update Retropie and not lose the Atari games that I paid for? 1 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Kodos ✭ February 4 edited February 4 I ended up adding a Pi 3 to my collection and finally was able to install from the Atari card without issue. I have also installed the latest Retropie on my 4 and though this whole process I'm learning a lot about the Retro gaming world. It is fairly complicated matching emulators, roms, bios, controller configs, and directory locations. @Slacker55 if you do the install from the Atari card the roms are easy to locate. The are in folders under the roms folder for 2600, 5200, 7800, and arcade. You can transfer them to the same folders on another installation of Retropie. I am probably going to do that soon myself when I get the dual Fightstick with trackball. My plan is do the arcade games on the PI connected to the Fightstick and console games on the other using my Trooper 2 or Xbox controller.  1 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook ZCerberus19 ✭ February 22 @NickBiederman I seem to have the same error as Viking- the Pi tells me it thinks the SD card is damaged. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook NickBiederman admin February 22 @ZCerberus19 I'll send you a message about it 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook L_Skywalker Minnesota ✭ February 23 edited February 23 @NickBiederman, I hate to Pile on but I bought one on Feb 20, 2021. Blank screen on my Pi3 and unable to load error on my Pi4! HELP 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook ninja502 ky ✭ February 26 @L_Skywalker the current cards only work on the Raspberry Pi 3/3B+/3A+ @NickBiederman or @LandShark talked about there being a pi4 image but it wasn't ready yet . I would like to update mine to a pi4 system also 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook lethall Caledonia, OH ✭ February 28 edited March 1 I have a similar problem - my new Pi 3B+ boots into the installer and retains my WiFi settings; but resets in the middle of the download (at various places) My power supply was inadequate. Current starvation was causing instability. If you're powering joysticks, at least 2A is needed! 1 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook russlb ✭ March 12 I purchased the Atari Retro-cade kit on sale and it came with the Atari Micro SD CARD that only had a default Raspbian install on it. @NickBiederman can you please assist? 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook NickBiederman admin March 12 @russlb I'll send you a direct message 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook russlb ✭ March 14 @NickBiederman Thanks. I was able to get it installed and working with one problem. The previous videos for the games all have sound but when I play any game there's no sound at all. Anyone else run into this? 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook russlb ✭ March 14 Anyone encountering a sound issue not coming out of the stereo port, I did this: RetroPie Setup->Configuration->Audio->3.5mm Works fine now! 2 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook bartipoo ✭ March 23 @LandShark or @NickBiederman can you help me? I had it working without issues and then somethin went wrong with the SD card image so I could no longer boot. How can I get access to restore the image? https://www.microcenter.com/product/624102/atari-pi-kit 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook bartipoo ✭ March 24 https://community.microcenter.com/discussion/comment/30017#Comment_30017 I contacted Microcenter support today and was giving access to the image after showing proof of purchase. My question now if what is the most current image VERSION so we can confirm we are running the newest update and for future updates? 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Jbnc2010 ✭ March 31 Is there a Pi4 image yet? I ordered this online and did not see the Pi3 limitations. Should I return it? Thanks. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook TSTDavey admin March 31 @Jbnc2010 just chiming in. You are referring to your purchased atari kit from MC correct? If so, we'll need to look at your order. We'll create ticket to follow up with you via email. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook fwfa ✭ April 3 edited April 3 I purchased the Atari SD card April 2nd 2021. It boots to a black screen, any help would be greatly appreciated? 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Gerbrik ✭ April 6 @LandShark or @NickBiedermanplease help. I purchased the full size Atari cabinet last night and it came with the default Raspian image as well. Can you please provide me with the installation image? 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook fwfa ✭ April 9 Sounds like I did not read the package very well as this is for a PI3. None the less the biggest reason I wanted to purchase this is so it would help in covering my rights to have the game. @NickBiederman or @LandShark Hopefully a PI4 version will come out soon and that with my proof of purchase I will be allowed to upgrade to the PI4 image??? 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook BernieJ ✭ April 14 Hi - How do I go about getting this image. I purchased mine today and the Pi just boots into the std PI os. I did the online chat and the dude said they would send me an image - but still no Image. really aggravated about this. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Purduecoz ✭ April 25 Hi, Just grabbed the Atari Bartop kit last week and my sdcard also has a standard raspbian install. No Atari roms. Store has been unable to help. Would appreciate anything you can do. Thank you.  0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook TSTDavey admin April 25 @Purduecoz just chiming in. We need to validate the order for the Atari Kit to determine what we can do. Can you give us the reference number off your receipt? We only have access to the reference number history. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Purduecoz ✭ April 26 edited April 26 @TSTDavey Is there a better avenue than posting it here or is that ok?  Can’t seem to find a way to direct message you.  0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook jdovi ✭ April 28 I just got the retro bar top arcade and this 32gb chip is completely empty, can you send a download link? 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook TSTDavey admin April 28 @Purduecoz you can post the reference number here. We only have access to it as its a Microcenter number. I can also inbox you as well. Let me know if you prefer that. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Purduecoz ✭ April 28 edited April 29 @TSTDavey No problem. Reference number is  0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook TSTDavey admin April 28 @Purduecoz I've created a ticket on our internally for the SD card. If there are any issues we'll let you know. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Fishhead1 ✭ June 7 Bought an open box version of the Atari Dual stick; however, the keys to the case were missing (had to pick the lock), and I think the SD card is messed up, and so are the buttons. Should I bring it back to the store and try to buy a non-open box? 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook TSPhillipT admin June 7 Hello @Fishhead1 Thank you for posting on the Micro Center Community! I am sorry to hear that your Open Box Atari Dual Stick had items missing and a messed up SD Card. I recommend coming back to the store and an in-store manager can definitely assist you with getting a replacement. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook «12» Categories 6.5K All Categories 992 The Blog 30 What's Trending 155 How to & Technical Guides 8 Computer Hardware 118 Software 3 Home Office 5 Networking Audio/Visual 1 Home Automation 15 3D Printers 5 Maker 14 PC Build Guides 76 Reviews & Buying Guides 23 Build Showcase 11 Contests 33 Past Contests 698 The Community 1.7K General Discussion 101 New Members 61 Consumer Tech 15 Prebuilt PCs and Laptops 71 Software 2 Audio/Visual 11 Networking & Security 1 Home Automation 2 Digital Photography 3 Content Creators 21 Hobby Boards & Projects 22 3D Printing 45 Retro Arcade/Gaming 77 All Other Tech 1.2K Store Information and Policy 46 Off Topic 5 Community Ideas & Feedback 109 Your Completed Builds 2.6K Build-Your-Own PC 1.6K Help Choosing Parts 217 Graphics Cards 157 CPUs, Memory, and Motherboards 61 Cases and Power Supplies 19 Air and Liquid Cooling 11 Monitors and Displays 28 Peripherals 6 All Other Parts 17 Featured Categories We love seeing what our customers build Submit photos and a description of your PC to our build showcase Submit Now Looking for a little inspiration? See other custom PC builds and get some ideas for what can be done View Build Showcase View builds by: AMD Processors Intel Processors RTX 3090 RTX 3080 RTX 2080 Ti RTX 2080 Super RTX 2070 Super RTX 2070 RTX 2060 Super Radeon RX 5700XT Radeon RX 5700 Air Cooled Liquid Cooled SAME DAY CUSTOM BUILD SERVICE If You Can Dream it, We Can Build it. Services starting at $149.99 More Details Micro Center Homepage Desktops Laptops Computer Parts Computer Accessories Custom PC Builder Build Showcase Networking Electronics 3D Printing Service, Upgrades & Repairs Laptop Battery Replacement Laptop Screen Repair Virus and Malware Removal Hard Drive Recovery and Backup Apple MacBook Repair Custom Built PCs Schedule an Appointment © Vanilla Foundation Theme 2021 Powered By Vanilla Community Article What is the best approach to put together a Raspberry Pi temperature logger? — Micro Center Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker {$smarty.capture.menu} Activity Categories Discussions Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker Home › Consumer Tech › Hobby Boards & Projects What is the best approach to put together a Raspberry Pi temperature logger? Bouvet ✭ December 2020 in Hobby Boards & Projects I am contemplating a project to data log three temperature probes (K type) from a fermenter into a Raspberry Pi - directly into a spreadsheet with a graphical output.  I have no Pi experience, but from a crude search, I know it is possible.  I can handle the spreadsheet stuff, but I need help on what type of equipment to purchase (type of Pi, accessory boards, cables).  I have the K probes, a wireless keyboard and mouse.  I also have an old RGB TV that I'd like to use - which I understand can be hooked to a Pi.  Ultimately, I'd like to run some thermodynamic/fermentation modeling with the data - which I can do myself, probably with Python.  Of course, I could do this by buying some off the shelf stuff, but I'd like the challenge and I'd like to do it on the cheap.  0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Answers TSMikeW admin December 2020 Greetings @Bouvet Hardware wise just, the sensors, wire, and you'll need a resistor for pull up. You're using it for a fermenter so I'd look at the Adafruit DS18B20. The wire is shrink wrapped and they include a 4.7K resistor. It's waterproofed. From there it's just wire and connecting the temperature sensors and resistor.  As for the Raspberry Pi I'd buy the 3 B+. You don't necessarily need it but it's $25 for the 1GB version. There are a few other things that would make it easier to assemble. I'd get a Pi Cobbler and a breadboard. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Bouvet ✭ December 2020 Thank you!  This helps.  I appreciate it.  Since I am happy with my k-type temperature probes for a couple of reasons.  How do I get them to connect to the Pi?  I see some small modules out there that seem to go between the probes and the Pi.  Are they needed? 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook TSMikeW admin December 2020 @Bouvet You'll be using the I2C bus to record data. So basically you're going to a GPIO pin for data, 3.3V to ground, K type should be 3-5V operating voltage. The resistor between the GPIO and and 3.3V for pull up. And then your ground of course. Easier with the breadboard and a cobbler. Just be careful and mindful of the power requirements. There are plenty of diagrams and guides online for connecting several temperature probes. to a Raspberry Pi. There's a good diagram in this article that should illustrate it pretty well: https://pimylifeup.com/raspberry-pi-temperature-sensor/ You can use the cobbler to connect the GPIO to the breadboard via a ribbon cable, probably a little easier. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook AlexPasseno Columbus OH Store Associate March 12 The Pimoroni enviro is a really good all in one solution for you with minimal work, you can even get one with an air quality sensor on it to. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Categories 6.5K All Categories 994 The Blog 32 What's Trending 155 How to & Technical Guides 8 Computer Hardware 118 Software 3 Home Office 5 Networking Audio/Visual 1 Home Automation 15 3D Printers 5 Maker 14 PC Build Guides 76 Reviews & Buying Guides 23 Build Showcase 11 Contests 33 Past Contests 702 The Community 1.7K General Discussion 103 New Members 61 Consumer Tech 15 Prebuilt PCs and Laptops 71 Software 2 Audio/Visual 11 Networking & Security 1 Home Automation 2 Digital Photography 3 Content Creators 21 Hobby Boards & Projects 22 3D Printing 45 Retro Arcade/Gaming 77 All Other Tech 1.2K Store Information and Policy 46 Off Topic 5 Community Ideas & Feedback 109 Your Completed Builds 2.6K Build-Your-Own PC 1.6K Help Choosing Parts 217 Graphics Cards 157 CPUs, Memory, and Motherboards 61 Cases and Power Supplies 19 Air and Liquid Cooling 11 Monitors and Displays 33 Peripherals 6 All Other Parts 17 Featured Categories We love seeing what our customers build Submit photos and a description of your PC to our build showcase Submit Now Looking for a little inspiration? See other custom PC builds and get some ideas for what can be done View Build Showcase View builds by: AMD Processors Intel Processors RTX 3090 RTX 3080 RTX 2080 Ti RTX 2080 Super RTX 2070 Super RTX 2070 RTX 2060 Super Radeon RX 5700XT Radeon RX 5700 Air Cooled Liquid Cooled SAME DAY CUSTOM BUILD SERVICE If You Can Dream it, We Can Build it. Services starting at $149.99 More Details Micro Center Homepage Desktops Laptops Computer Parts Computer Accessories Custom PC Builder Build Showcase Networking Electronics 3D Printing Service, Upgrades & Repairs Laptop Battery Replacement Laptop Screen Repair Virus and Malware Removal Hard Drive Recovery and Backup Apple MacBook Repair Custom Built PCs Schedule an Appointment © Vanilla Foundation Theme 2021 Powered By Vanilla Community Article How to set up a Raspberry Pi — Micro Center Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker {$smarty.capture.menu} Activity Categories Discussions Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker Home › How to & Technical Guides › Maker How to set up a Raspberry Pi Cfresh Columbus, Ohio admin July 11 edited September 14 in Maker Have you just recently purchased a Raspberry Pi and don't know where to start? Then, this is the place to be. We'll go over what you need and where to start when setting up your Pi for the first time so you can jump right into making projects! What You Will Need Raspberry Pi (Any Model) Micro USB Cable MicroSD Card Keyboard & Mouse (Wired) HDMI Cable (Micro HDMI on Pi 4) MicroSD card adapter or port PC or Mac Ethernet Cable (optional) Setting Up The MicroSD Card The MicroSD card is important for your Pi as it will house the Pi's operating system (OS), a necessity for almost everything you can do with Pi. Go to the Pi downloads page here, scroll down, and select the download link for your computer's OS. Once the installer has downloaded, go to your downloads and run the program. You will be prompted to select the OS you want to install. There are a lot of options, so it's helpful to know what you want to use your Pi for. If you're looking for a starter project, however, keep following along. We are going to download Raspberry Pi OS to turn our Pi into a mini-computer! We will do this by selecting "Raspberry Pi OS (32-bit)." Next, you will insert the MicroSD Card into your PC (Or SD card Adapter for MicroSD) and hit "chose storage" to select your card from the list. Once your card is selected, you can move on. Once you have the OS and storage selected, click on write, and the program will start to image the card! Connecting The Pi Once the OS has been successfully written to the card, remove the MicroSD card from your PC and insert it into the Pi's Micro-SD card port. Next, connect your wired keyboard and mouse to the Raspberry Pi's USB ports. Next, we'll set up a display. If you have a Raspberry Pi 1, 2, or 3, you will connect to your display with HDMI. (Left Image) If you have a Raspberry Pi 4, you will connect with one of the two Mini HDMI ports. (Right Image) The Pi 4 supports up to two displays as well. Time for the internet! If you want your Pi to have access to the internet, you can hook it up via ethernet to this port. You can connect this to a wall ethernet port, router, or any other device that outputs ethernet. Last but certainly not least is power. You will need to connect the Pi to a USB wall adapter with a Micro-USB cable, just like charging a smartphone. Going Through the Initial Setup When you plug in the Pi, this will display on your screen after boot up. Select next to begin Select your country, time zone, and language on this screen, then select next Next, you will select your password and confirm it. Once you confirm the password, you can select next to move on. This is a section unique to Pi set-up - the Pi is checking to make sure it is accurately filling the whole screen. Check if there is a black border around your screen. If it is surrounded by a black border, then check the box and push next. Select your Wifi network here and login if needed. If you don't want wifi or plan to use ethernet, select skip. Otherwise, push next after you selected your network. Your Pi is completely set up as a mini-computer! Now you can treat this as a small PC and use it for any purpose you need! But, before you do..... You should put your Pi in a case! Raspberry Pi's are functional motherboards, but they leave the components exposed. A case protects your Pi and its components from dust, falls, and other damage. A case also allows the user to install a fan if needed as some processes will require cooling. Finding the Right Case Pi cases are not hard to find but finding the right one is important. Not all Pis are the same size, and not all Pis have the same ports. Make sure to select the case your Pi needs. If you have a Raspberry Pi 4, you'll want to choose a case for the Pi 4. Also, keep in mind whether you intend to install fans, as some cases don't allow for this type of expansion. Installing the Case When installing the case, make sure the Pi sits evenly in the case and that the ports are correctly aligned with their cutouts. Once it is aligned correctly, the top half of the case will snap into place. If it does not, make sure the Pi is even with the bottom of the case. Some cases will require you to screw the top half in, while others will only require it to be snapped in. Installed and Good to Go Once you have your Pi screwed or snapped in, you are all set! Your Pi is now protected. You can switch your case at a later time to fit the look you want as there are many different designs. There are even some retro game console themes! If you would like to see cases that Micro Center carries, click here. You might find something that fits your needs and style! More from the Micro Center Community: Looking for more information about Raspberry Pi? We’ve got a Hobby Board section of the community, as well as Hobby Board guides like The Definitive Micro Computer Buying Guide, Raspberry Pi Basics, and Using the Raspberry Pi Pico. And if you can’t find what you’re looking for, don’t hesitate to post a new discussion and the Community will be happy to help! 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Comments pervin_utdallas_edu ✭ August 18 Is there an easy way to use my laptop's keyboard and screen as the i/o for my Raspberry Pi? 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Ian admin August 19 https://community.microcenter.com/discussion/comment/35470#Comment_35470 I found this guide from Raspberry Pi that may be able to assist you with that process: https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/use-your-desktop-or-laptop-screen-and-keyboard-with-your-pi/ 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Categories 6.5K All Categories 994 The Blog 32 What's Trending 155 How to & Technical Guides 8 Computer Hardware 118 Software 3 Home Office 5 Networking Audio/Visual 1 Home Automation 15 3D Printers 5 Maker 14 PC Build Guides 76 Reviews & Buying Guides 23 Build Showcase 11 Contests 33 Past Contests 702 The Community 1.7K General Discussion 103 New Members 61 Consumer Tech 15 Prebuilt PCs and Laptops 71 Software 2 Audio/Visual 11 Networking & Security 1 Home Automation 2 Digital Photography 3 Content Creators 21 Hobby Boards & Projects 22 3D Printing 45 Retro Arcade/Gaming 77 All Other Tech 1.2K Store Information and Policy 46 Off Topic 5 Community Ideas & Feedback 109 Your Completed Builds 2.6K Build-Your-Own PC 1.6K Help Choosing Parts 217 Graphics Cards 157 CPUs, Memory, and Motherboards 61 Cases and Power Supplies 19 Air and Liquid Cooling 11 Monitors and Displays 33 Peripherals 6 All Other Parts 17 Featured Categories We love seeing what our customers build Submit photos and a description of your PC to our build showcase Submit Now Looking for a little inspiration? See other custom PC builds and get some ideas for what can be done View Build Showcase View builds by: AMD Processors Intel Processors RTX 3090 RTX 3080 RTX 2080 Ti RTX 2080 Super RTX 2070 Super RTX 2070 RTX 2060 Super Radeon RX 5700XT Radeon RX 5700 Air Cooled Liquid Cooled SAME DAY CUSTOM BUILD SERVICE If You Can Dream it, We Can Build it. Services starting at $149.99 More Details Micro Center Homepage Desktops Laptops Computer Parts Computer Accessories Custom PC Builder Build Showcase Networking Electronics 3D Printing Service, Upgrades & Repairs Laptop Battery Replacement Laptop Screen Repair Virus and Malware Removal Hard Drive Recovery and Backup Apple MacBook Repair Custom Built PCs Schedule an Appointment © Vanilla Foundation Theme 2021 Powered By Vanilla Community Article How to Create a Retro Game Console With Raspberry Pi — Micro Center Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker {$smarty.capture.menu} Activity Categories Discussions Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker Home › What's Trending How to Create a Retro Game Console With Raspberry Pi Cfresh Columbus, Ohio admin August 2 edited August 25 in What's Trending Do you miss going to arcades? Or are you too young for that and just want to play some retro arcade games? Well, with Raspberry Pi, you are in luck. You can actually turn your Pi into a retro arcade game machine with access to hundreds of games. You'll be able to play more games on one little device than you ever could at an arcade. Get ready to recreate an arcade right in your living room. What You Will Need Raspberry PI (At least a Model 3 but a 4 Would be best) Micro SD card adapter Display Micro SD Card Game USB Controller PC to Image Micro-SD Case to Protect Pi (Optional) USB Storage Device for Games How to Set Up the Micro SD First, you will have to download the Pi Imager here. This will convert your SD card into an Operating System (OS) for the Pi. Once you are here, select Choose OS. Once you are here, select Emulation and Game OS Select RetroPie From the options Then select the version of the Pi you are using. In this case, we are using the Raspberry Pi 4, so we will select RetroPie 4.7.1 (RPI 4/400) After that, you will select the SD card you have inserted into your PC so the program can Image it with your selected OS. Once you have everything selected, just hit Write, and the program will image the card. How to Set Up Raspberry Pi for RetroPie Once you have your Micro-SD Card imaged, you will want to insert it into the Pi like in the image below. You'll also need to connect the rest of the cables. We've put together a great guide on how to do that here. Make sure you also plug the controller into one of the Pi USB ports (Shown Below) Once you have everything hooked up, power on the Pi, and you will be greeted with a string of text. This is the Pi configuring itself. Once this is complete, you will be greeted with the next step. Once the configuration is completed, you will then begin keybinding. Keybinding is the process of programming your input methods. In other words, establishing what happens when you press "up". Hold any button to start keybinding, and then press the corresponding button the screen shows on your controller. How To Install Games on Raspberry Pi When it comes to games, there are two main different ways to get them we will go over. At Microcenter, we carry an Atari Micro SD Card which can be inserted into your pi and comes with over 100 licensed Atari games. This is a quick and easy way to get your Pi set up with these games. Information on how to get this micro sd card set up can be found here. If you'd rather find games you own from different consoles, you can also download specific games online. First, you need to insert a USB drive into the PC and format it. Older games are generally pretty small, so 16GB is most likely enough, but you can use any size. Next, you will right-click on the drive in This PC and click format. Make sure the file system is Fat32 and label the volume "RetroPie," and create a folder on the drive named RetroPie. When complete, you will then insert the flash drive into the Pi so it can boot up. Once booted up, turn off the Pi and put the flash drive back into your PC, and you will see the files below. Navigate to the roms folder Once there, you will select the system your ROM is on. In our case, we have Pac-Man on the Atari 2600, so we will select that. Next, drag and drop the ROM you downloaded into the correct system folder and remove the drive. Finally, insert the flash drive, and you will be greeted with this screen, and you should see however many games you downloaded are available and their consoles. After selecting your console, you should see the games you downloaded. Just select, and you are good to go! You can now play your retro games. Enjoy this blast from the past as you can play hundreds of games on your Pi right from your living room! More from the Micro Center Community: Looking for more information about Raspberry Pi? We’ve got a Hobby Board section of the community, as well as Hobby Board guides like The Definitive Micro Computer Buying Guide, Raspberry Pi Basics, and Installing the latest RetroPie Image with the Atari Games Card. And if you can’t find what you’re looking for, don’t hesitate to post a new discussion and the Community will be happy to help! 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Leave a Comment Rich Text Editor. To edit a paragraph's style, hit tab to get to the paragraph menu. From there you will be able to pick one style. Nothing defaults to paragraph. An inline formatting menu will show up when you select text. Hit tab to get into that menu. Some elements, such as rich link embeds, images, loading indicators, and error messages may get inserted into the editor. You may navigate to these using the arrow keys inside of the editor and delete them with the delete or backspace key. Comment As ... Categories 6.5K All Categories 992 The Blog 30 What's Trending 155 How to & Technical Guides 8 Computer Hardware 118 Software 3 Home Office 5 Networking Audio/Visual 1 Home Automation 15 3D Printers 5 Maker 14 PC Build Guides 76 Reviews & Buying Guides 23 Build Showcase 11 Contests 33 Past Contests 697 The Community 1.7K General Discussion 101 New Members 61 Consumer Tech 15 Prebuilt PCs and Laptops 71 Software 2 Audio/Visual 11 Networking & Security 1 Home Automation 2 Digital Photography 3 Content Creators 21 Hobby Boards & Projects 22 3D Printing 45 Retro Arcade/Gaming 77 All Other Tech 1.2K Store Information and Policy 46 Off Topic 5 Community Ideas & Feedback 109 Your Completed Builds 2.6K Build-Your-Own PC 1.6K Help Choosing Parts 217 Graphics Cards 157 CPUs, Memory, and Motherboards 61 Cases and Power Supplies 19 Air and Liquid Cooling 11 Monitors and Displays 28 Peripherals 6 All Other Parts 17 Featured Categories We love seeing what our customers build Submit photos and a description of your PC to our build showcase Submit Now Looking for a little inspiration? See other custom PC builds and get some ideas for what can be done View Build Showcase View builds by: AMD Processors Intel Processors RTX 3090 RTX 3080 RTX 2080 Ti RTX 2080 Super RTX 2070 Super RTX 2070 RTX 2060 Super Radeon RX 5700XT Radeon RX 5700 Air Cooled Liquid Cooled SAME DAY CUSTOM BUILD SERVICE If You Can Dream it, We Can Build it. Services starting at $149.99 More Details Micro Center Homepage Desktops Laptops Computer Parts Computer Accessories Custom PC Builder Build Showcase Networking Electronics 3D Printing Service, Upgrades & Repairs Laptop Battery Replacement Laptop Screen Repair Virus and Malware Removal Hard Drive Recovery and Backup Apple MacBook Repair Custom Built PCs Schedule an Appointment © Vanilla Foundation Theme 2021 Powered By Vanilla Community Article raspberry pi — Micro Center Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker {$smarty.capture.menu} Activity Categories Discussions Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker Home › General Discussion raspberry pi irvingf ✭ December 2020 edited June 7 in General Discussion Hi: I am interested in starting a raspberry setup. What kit would you recommend? I see a pi4 and pi4B what is the difference? 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Comments LandShark admin December 2020 Hello @irvingf! Welcome to the community! I think the specific model Pi that I'd recommend could change based on what you plan to do with it. As a base, I'd recommend the Pi 4 Model B. It's a really great option for just about everyone, beginners and advanced. Here's a list view comparing all the different Raspberry Pi's and their features. We do carry a couple of kits that will have everything you need to get started as well. Typically I'd recommend going with the 4GB or 8GB models. More RAM typically allows you to multitask more. Here's a CanaKit - 4GB: https://www.microcenter.com/product/615270/canakit-raspberry-pi-4-starter-max-kit-(4gb-ram) and here's the Official Raspberry Pi 4 Kit - 4GB: https://www.microcenter.com/product/625369/raspberry-pi-official-pi-4-essentials-kit---4gb I hope this info helps, but I'd be happy to discuss it further if you have any other questions or concerns! 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Categories 6.5K All Categories 994 The Blog 32 What's Trending 155 How to & Technical Guides 8 Computer Hardware 118 Software 3 Home Office 5 Networking Audio/Visual 1 Home Automation 15 3D Printers 5 Maker 14 PC Build Guides 76 Reviews & Buying Guides 23 Build Showcase 11 Contests 33 Past Contests 702 The Community 1.7K General Discussion 103 New Members 61 Consumer Tech 15 Prebuilt PCs and Laptops 71 Software 2 Audio/Visual 11 Networking & Security 1 Home Automation 2 Digital Photography 3 Content Creators 21 Hobby Boards & Projects 22 3D Printing 45 Retro Arcade/Gaming 77 All Other Tech 1.2K Store Information and Policy 46 Off Topic 5 Community Ideas & Feedback 109 Your Completed Builds 2.6K Build-Your-Own PC 1.6K Help Choosing Parts 217 Graphics Cards 157 CPUs, Memory, and Motherboards 61 Cases and Power Supplies 19 Air and Liquid Cooling 11 Monitors and Displays 33 Peripherals 6 All Other Parts 17 Featured Categories We love seeing what our customers build Submit photos and a description of your PC to our build showcase Submit Now Looking for a little inspiration? See other custom PC builds and get some ideas for what can be done View Build Showcase View builds by: AMD Processors Intel Processors RTX 3090 RTX 3080 RTX 2080 Ti RTX 2080 Super RTX 2070 Super RTX 2070 RTX 2060 Super Radeon RX 5700XT Radeon RX 5700 Air Cooled Liquid Cooled SAME DAY CUSTOM BUILD SERVICE If You Can Dream it, We Can Build it. Services starting at $149.99 More Details Micro Center Homepage Desktops Laptops Computer Parts Computer Accessories Custom PC Builder Build Showcase Networking Electronics 3D Printing Service, Upgrades & Repairs Laptop Battery Replacement Laptop Screen Repair Virus and Malware Removal Hard Drive Recovery and Backup Apple MacBook Repair Custom Built PCs Schedule an Appointment © Vanilla Foundation Theme 2021 Powered By Vanilla Community Article How to Set Up a Raspberry Pi Media Server — Micro Center Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker {$smarty.capture.menu} Activity Categories Discussions Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker Home › What's Trending How to Set Up a Raspberry Pi Media Server Cfresh Columbus, Ohio admin August 11 edited September 1 in What's Trending How often do you go to check Netflix to find your favorite movie and it's not on the site? don't you wish there was some way to take all the old DVDs lying around your house and watch them on any of your devices? A Pi media server is just for you! With a Pi media server, you can take all of those old movies around your house and upload them to the server to watch from anywhere. How Does a Raspberry Pi Media Server Work? The server runs off a program called Kodi. Kodi is a media server application made for this purpose specifically. It runs on your Raspberry Pi via ethernet so you can easily plug it in and let it do its thing. You can then upload movies, songs, pictures, and TV shows to the server and view them from anywhere. It's like your own personal Netflix that you create! What You Will Need to Set Up a Raspberry Pi Media Server Raspberry Pi (With ethernet port) Micro SD Card Micro SD card adapter An external display (like a monitor) KODI External Storage for movies/music/media Setting up Kodi on your Pi Before starting up anything you'll need to make sure Raspberry Pi OS is installed on the Pi. We already have a great guide on how to do this here. Starting off you will need to download Kodi. You can do so by opening the terminal by hitting the terminal icon at the top of the screen and typing in the command: sudo apt-get install kodi Once you enter this command it may prompt you to say yes or no. Type "y" and push enter, and the command prompt will download Kodi for you. Once complete type "Kodi" into the command prompt and it will launch. Next, there are some settings you have to configure. Select the gear icon in the top left to access settings. Select "Services" Check the bubble on the right side for "Enable UPNP Support" to allow your server to be discoverable from other devices. Setting Up Media Storage To set up a media server you will need an external storage device hooked up to your Pi. But first, you will need to Format so Hook the device up to your PC via USB. Next, you will right-click on the drive located in "This PC" and select "Format." Make sure that the External storage is set to file system FAT32, name the volume and press start to format the drive. Once formatted you can add your movies, photos, and music to the drive. Now we are going to identify the source for the library. Connect the drive to the Pi and select the gear icon again. Select Media Select the Library tab and under Manage Sources select the type of media you are trying to put on the server (videos, music, or pictures) Select Add Music... Once here select Browse. Now navigate to the USB drive by selecting navigating to Root filesystem/media/pi/ESD-USB. Once you get your attached storage device, select ok in the corner. Now that the storage drive is selected press ok. You have now identified your library! The next step, view your media from anywhere in the house. Viewing your media Now that your library is identified, you will need to get other devices on your network to view it. In this case, I am using a Macbook Air with Kodi installed but you can do it with any device with Kodi. Go ahead and select the type of media you would like to view and hit Enter Files Section Select Add Videos... Select UPnP Devices And As long as you are on the same network as your Pi it should show up here! Now you can view all of your movies from any device as long as you have them in your server library from anywhere in your home. Enjoy your at-home custom streaming service. More from the Micro Center Community: Looking for more information about Raspberry Pi? We’ve got a Hobby Board section of the community, as well as Hobby Board guides like The Definitive Micro Computer Buying Guide, Raspberry Pi Basics, and How to Create a Retro Game Console With Raspberry Pi. And if you can’t find what you’re looking for, don’t hesitate to post a new discussion and the Community will be happy to help! 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Comments JRC ✭ September 2 External storage - How much per movie? 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook LandShark admin September 2 @JRC The amount of storage that a movie will take up would depend on the length, compression, and quality of the movie. High definition files typically take up to 2-4 GB. 1 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Leave a Comment Rich Text Editor. To edit a paragraph's style, hit tab to get to the paragraph menu. From there you will be able to pick one style. Nothing defaults to paragraph. An inline formatting menu will show up when you select text. Hit tab to get into that menu. Some elements, such as rich link embeds, images, loading indicators, and error messages may get inserted into the editor. You may navigate to these using the arrow keys inside of the editor and delete them with the delete or backspace key. Comment As ... Categories 6.5K All Categories 994 The Blog 32 What's Trending 155 How to & Technical Guides 8 Computer Hardware 118 Software 3 Home Office 5 Networking Audio/Visual 1 Home Automation 15 3D Printers 5 Maker 14 PC Build Guides 76 Reviews & Buying Guides 23 Build Showcase 11 Contests 33 Past Contests 703 The Community 1.7K General Discussion 102 New Members 63 Consumer Tech 15 Prebuilt PCs and Laptops 71 Software 2 Audio/Visual 11 Networking & Security 1 Home Automation 2 Digital Photography 3 Content Creators 21 Hobby Boards & Projects 22 3D Printing 46 Retro Arcade/Gaming 78 All Other Tech 1.2K Store Information and Policy 46 Off Topic 5 Community Ideas & Feedback 109 Your Completed Builds 2.6K Build-Your-Own PC 1.6K Help Choosing Parts 217 Graphics Cards 157 CPUs, Memory, and Motherboards 61 Cases and Power Supplies 19 Air and Liquid Cooling 11 Monitors and Displays 33 Peripherals 6 All Other Parts 17 Featured Categories We love seeing what our customers build Submit photos and a description of your PC to our build showcase Submit Now Looking for a little inspiration? See other custom PC builds and get some ideas for what can be done View Build Showcase View builds by: AMD Processors Intel Processors RTX 3090 RTX 3080 RTX 2080 Ti RTX 2080 Super RTX 2070 Super RTX 2070 RTX 2060 Super Radeon RX 5700XT Radeon RX 5700 Air Cooled Liquid Cooled SAME DAY CUSTOM BUILD SERVICE If You Can Dream it, We Can Build it. Services starting at $149.99 More Details Micro Center Homepage Desktops Laptops Computer Parts Computer Accessories Custom PC Builder Build Showcase Networking Electronics 3D Printing Service, Upgrades & Repairs Laptop Battery Replacement Laptop Screen Repair Virus and Malware Removal Hard Drive Recovery and Backup Apple MacBook Repair Custom Built PCs Schedule an Appointment © Vanilla Foundation Theme 2021 Powered By Vanilla Community Article Raspberry Pi 400 — Micro Center Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker {$smarty.capture.menu} Activity Categories Discussions Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker Home › General Discussion Raspberry Pi 400 Dismal ✭ July 11 in General Discussion Hello I have been wanting a raspberry pi 400 for a project but at the Madison Hights location, they are out. When will they get a restock? 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Comments Ian admin July 13 Greetings, I’m sorry but I do not have an ETA on when we will stock this item. We recommend bookmarking the product page and keep an eye on the product stock levels! https://community.microcenter.com/kb/articles/194-what-do-i-do-if-an-item-is-out-of-stock Once you see the item in stock, you can reserve an item by following the instructions on this knowledge base article! https://community.microcenter.com/kb/articles/30-how-to-reserve-an-item-online 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Categories 6.5K All Categories 994 The Blog 32 What's Trending 155 How to & Technical Guides 8 Computer Hardware 118 Software 3 Home Office 5 Networking Audio/Visual 1 Home Automation 15 3D Printers 5 Maker 14 PC Build Guides 76 Reviews & Buying Guides 23 Build Showcase 11 Contests 33 Past Contests 702 The Community 1.7K General Discussion 103 New Members 61 Consumer Tech 15 Prebuilt PCs and Laptops 71 Software 2 Audio/Visual 11 Networking & Security 1 Home Automation 2 Digital Photography 3 Content Creators 21 Hobby Boards & Projects 22 3D Printing 45 Retro Arcade/Gaming 77 All Other Tech 1.2K Store Information and Policy 46 Off Topic 5 Community Ideas & Feedback 109 Your Completed Builds 2.6K Build-Your-Own PC 1.6K Help Choosing Parts 217 Graphics Cards 157 CPUs, Memory, and Motherboards 61 Cases and Power Supplies 19 Air and Liquid Cooling 11 Monitors and Displays 33 Peripherals 6 All Other Parts 17 Featured Categories We love seeing what our customers build Submit photos and a description of your PC to our build showcase Submit Now Looking for a little inspiration? See other custom PC builds and get some ideas for what can be done View Build Showcase View builds by: AMD Processors Intel Processors RTX 3090 RTX 3080 RTX 2080 Ti RTX 2080 Super RTX 2070 Super RTX 2070 RTX 2060 Super Radeon RX 5700XT Radeon RX 5700 Air Cooled Liquid Cooled SAME DAY CUSTOM BUILD SERVICE If You Can Dream it, We Can Build it. Services starting at $149.99 More Details Micro Center Homepage Desktops Laptops Computer Parts Computer Accessories Custom PC Builder Build Showcase Networking Electronics 3D Printing Service, Upgrades & Repairs Laptop Battery Replacement Laptop Screen Repair Virus and Malware Removal Hard Drive Recovery and Backup Apple MacBook Repair Custom Built PCs Schedule an Appointment © Vanilla Foundation Theme 2021 Powered By Vanilla Community Article Raspberry Pi Basics — Micro Center Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker {$smarty.capture.menu} Activity Categories Discussions Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker Home › Consumer Tech › Hobby Boards & Projects Raspberry Pi Basics NickBiederman admin December 2020 edited December 2020 in Hobby Boards & Projects Setting up a Raspberry Pi often involves several basic processes that are the same for every project. This post is meant to serve as a beginner’s guide to some of those processes so you can reference it while working on your project. I’ll be adding more to this post over time. Click on the links below to jump to the appropriate comment.   Flashing an OS with the Raspberry Pi Imager Setting up Wi-Fi and SSH for “Headless” systems Configuring SSH, cameras, SPI, and other I/O Backing up your installation- Windows (macOS, Raspbian, and Linux coming soon!) 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Comments NickBiederman admin December 2020 edited December 2020 Flashing an operating system to your SD card is one of the most basic tasks when setting up a Raspberry Pi. While you can buy SD cards with an operating system or NOOBS pre-installed, it’s cheaper to start with a blank card and flashing the OS yourself opens up a wide range of specialized operating systems. Some of my favorites include Octopi and Volumio. Start by downloading the Raspberry Pi imager from the Raspberry Pi website and installing it on your computer. You’ll need administrator access to install and run the program. If you plan to use a specialized image like those listed above, download and save the image file from the publisher as well. After installing the imager, plug your microSD card into the computer (you may need a card reader, like this two in one version) and launch the imager. Click “Choose OS”.   Next, you’ll need to decide if you want to use a default OS (like Raspbian or Retropie) or not. If you want to use a default OS, simply click the name of the OS in the window. If you’re using a different image, scroll to the bottom and click “Use Custom”. This will open a file explorer you’ll use to navigate to the image you downloaded earlier. Select the image and click “Open”. n this case, I selected "MasterAtariNoobs.img". Next, click “Choose SD card” and select the appropriate drive in the pop up window. Make sure you don’t select the wrong drive as the drive will be erased. Finally, click “Write”. The imager will go through a writing phase then a verify phase. Once this is done, the card is ejected and you’re good to go. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook NickBiederman admin December 2020 edited December 2020 Not all projects are conducive to a keyboard, mouse, and monitor. Sometimes it’s better to access your pi via SSH. This is easy if you have an ethernet connection available, but can be problematic if you need to use Wi-Fi. Thankfully, there’s a method for configuring Wi-Fi before even booting your pi. First, we’ll enable SSH. Plug your SD card into your computer and navigate to the drive labeled “Boot”. Create a file names “ssh” with no file extension and save it here. The file should be empty and not have a file extension like “.txt”. You can use any text editor to create an empty .txt file and save it to the boot drive. You can then rename the file to remove the file extension. If you’re using Ethernet, you can now eject the card from your PC and boot your Pi. You’ll be able to access it from a terminal using “ssh [email protected]”, where is the IP address assigned your pi. If you’re on Windows, you can use Putty or WSL to connect via SSH. It's important to change your password after enabling SSH. This can be done with Raspi Config, described in the next comment. Connecting Wi-Fi is similar to enabling .ssh. Create a .txt file named “wpa_supplicant.conf” with the following content:

ctrl_interface=DIR=/var/run/wpa_supplicant GROUP=netdev

update_config=1

country=US

network={

    ssid="

  psk=""

  key_mgmt=WPA-PSK

}

Replace and with your network name and network password, but leave the quotation marks. Save the file to the root of your boot (just like the ssh file). Next time you boot your Pi it will automatically connect to your Wi-Fi network. This will work for almost all home networks in America. If you’re in another country change “US” after “country=” to the 2 letter code for your country. If you use something other than WPA-PSK for network security you’ll need to change the key_mgmt as well. Very few people use a different management scheme, so it's unlikely you'll need to worry about changing key_mgmt. These files are provided in the “ssh_and_wifi.zip” at the bottom of this post. ssh_and_wifi.zip 379B 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook NickBiederman admin December 2020 Raspi-config is a very powerful tool for changing settings on your Pi. To access raspi-config, you’ll need to connect a monitor and mouse or SSH into your Pi (see the above comment for more info on SSH). Next, run “sudo raspi-config” from the terminal. This will open the following window:   Navigation is done using the up and down arrows to scroll through options, enter to select an option, the right arrow to move from “select” to “finish”. From here you can change all kind of hardware settings. Full documentation is available on Raspberry Pi’s website. Some particularly useful options include the display options, “Expand File System” under “Advanced Options”, and “Wireless LAN” under “System Options”. You can also change your password under “System Options”. This is very important if you have SSH enabled.  After making the changes you need to make, use the right arrow to highlight at the bottom of the screen. Press enter to exit the utility and reboot your pi with the command “sudo reboot” 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook NickBiederman admin December 2020 edited December 2020 Having an extra copy of your image can be useful in case an SD card fails or you need to duplicate an installation. For Windows, I like to use Win32 Disk Imager. After downloading and installing the program, connect your Micro SD card to the computer (I like to use this two in one card reader) and launch the program. Click the file icon next to the field “Image Name”. This will open a file explorer. Navigate to the location you want to save the image and enter the file name in the field at the bottom. In my case, I’m creating “example.img” on my desktop. Make sure you don't choose the same location and name as another image our you'll overwrite it. Ensure the correct card is elected in the “Device” field (circled in red). Check the box next to “Read Only Allocated Partitions” (circled in green), then click “Read” (circled in blue). The program will read your file system to the file you selected and create a file that can be written to a new SD card as a custom image using the Raspberry Pi imager. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Categories 6.5K All Categories 994 The Blog 32 What's Trending 155 How to & Technical Guides 8 Computer Hardware 118 Software 3 Home Office 5 Networking Audio/Visual 1 Home Automation 15 3D Printers 5 Maker 14 PC Build Guides 76 Reviews & Buying Guides 23 Build Showcase 11 Contests 33 Past Contests 702 The Community 1.7K General Discussion 103 New Members 61 Consumer Tech 15 Prebuilt PCs and Laptops 71 Software 2 Audio/Visual 11 Networking & Security 1 Home Automation 2 Digital Photography 3 Content Creators 21 Hobby Boards & Projects 22 3D Printing 45 Retro Arcade/Gaming 77 All Other Tech 1.2K Store Information and Policy 46 Off Topic 5 Community Ideas & Feedback 109 Your Completed Builds 2.6K Build-Your-Own PC 1.6K Help Choosing Parts 217 Graphics Cards 157 CPUs, Memory, and Motherboards 61 Cases and Power Supplies 19 Air and Liquid Cooling 11 Monitors and Displays 33 Peripherals 6 All Other Parts 17 Featured Categories We love seeing what our customers build Submit photos and a description of your PC to our build showcase Submit Now Looking for a little inspiration? See other custom PC builds and get some ideas for what can be done View Build Showcase View builds by: AMD Processors Intel Processors RTX 3090 RTX 3080 RTX 2080 Ti RTX 2080 Super RTX 2070 Super RTX 2070 RTX 2060 Super Radeon RX 5700XT Radeon RX 5700 Air Cooled Liquid Cooled SAME DAY CUSTOM BUILD SERVICE If You Can Dream it, We Can Build it. Services starting at $149.99 More Details Micro Center Homepage Desktops Laptops Computer Parts Computer Accessories Custom PC Builder Build Showcase Networking Electronics 3D Printing Service, Upgrades & Repairs Laptop Battery Replacement Laptop Screen Repair Virus and Malware Removal Hard Drive Recovery and Backup Apple MacBook Repair Custom Built PCs Schedule an Appointment © Vanilla Foundation Theme 2021 Powered By Vanilla
Community Article Raspberry pi 400 — Micro Center Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker {$smarty.capture.menu} Activity Categories Discussions Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker Home › General Discussion Raspberry pi 400 Levi5 ✭ February 13 edited February 13 in General Discussion Down ! fall need windows or Mac for initial setup, or a wifi connection 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Comments Ian admin February 13 edited February 13 https://community.microcenter.com/discussion/7480/raspberry-pi-400 Greetings. The Pi 400 will use Pi OS, you connect it to a monitor via HDMI and you start from there. A lot of good info on the product can be found on the manufacturer's website: https://www.raspberrypi.org/products/raspberry-pi-400/?variant=raspberry-pi-400-us-kit& 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Categories 6.5K All Categories 994 The Blog 32 What's Trending 155 How to & Technical Guides 8 Computer Hardware 118 Software 3 Home Office 5 Networking Audio/Visual 1 Home Automation 15 3D Printers 5 Maker 14 PC Build Guides 76 Reviews & Buying Guides 23 Build Showcase 11 Contests 33 Past Contests 702 The Community 1.7K General Discussion 103 New Members 61 Consumer Tech 15 Prebuilt PCs and Laptops 71 Software 2 Audio/Visual 11 Networking & Security 1 Home Automation 2 Digital Photography 3 Content Creators 21 Hobby Boards & Projects 22 3D Printing 45 Retro Arcade/Gaming 77 All Other Tech 1.2K Store Information and Policy 46 Off Topic 5 Community Ideas & Feedback 109 Your Completed Builds 2.6K Build-Your-Own PC 1.6K Help Choosing Parts 217 Graphics Cards 157 CPUs, Memory, and Motherboards 61 Cases and Power Supplies 19 Air and Liquid Cooling 11 Monitors and Displays 33 Peripherals 6 All Other Parts 17 Featured Categories We love seeing what our customers build Submit photos and a description of your PC to our build showcase Submit Now Looking for a little inspiration? See other custom PC builds and get some ideas for what can be done View Build Showcase View builds by: AMD Processors Intel Processors RTX 3090 RTX 3080 RTX 2080 Ti RTX 2080 Super RTX 2070 Super RTX 2070 RTX 2060 Super Radeon RX 5700XT Radeon RX 5700 Air Cooled Liquid Cooled SAME DAY CUSTOM BUILD SERVICE If You Can Dream it, We Can Build it. Services starting at $149.99 More Details Micro Center Homepage Desktops Laptops Computer Parts Computer Accessories Custom PC Builder Build Showcase Networking Electronics 3D Printing Service, Upgrades & Repairs Laptop Battery Replacement Laptop Screen Repair Virus and Malware Removal Hard Drive Recovery and Backup Apple MacBook Repair Custom Built PCs Schedule an Appointment © Vanilla Foundation Theme 2021 Powered By Vanilla Community Article Raspberry Pi Pico — Micro Center Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker {$smarty.capture.menu} Activity Categories Discussions Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker Home › General Discussion Raspberry Pi Pico SpongeBob ✭ January 21 edited June 7 in General Discussion Do you have an availability date for the new raspberry pi pico? 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Comments LandShark admin January 21 Hello @SpongeBob, I'd recommend you check out our recent article on the Pico. https://community.microcenter.com/discussion/7037/raspberry-pi-pico-launch-what-you-need-to-know-giveaway They are available in-store today! 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Categories 6.5K All Categories 993 The Blog 31 What's Trending 155 How to & Technical Guides 8 Computer Hardware 118 Software 3 Home Office 5 Networking Audio/Visual 1 Home Automation 15 3D Printers 5 Maker 14 PC Build Guides 76 Reviews & Buying Guides 23 Build Showcase 11 Contests 33 Past Contests 702 The Community 1.7K General Discussion 103 New Members 61 Consumer Tech 15 Prebuilt PCs and Laptops 71 Software 2 Audio/Visual 11 Networking & Security 1 Home Automation 2 Digital Photography 3 Content Creators 21 Hobby Boards & Projects 22 3D Printing 45 Retro Arcade/Gaming 77 All Other Tech 1.2K Store Information and Policy 46 Off Topic 5 Community Ideas & Feedback 109 Your Completed Builds 2.6K Build-Your-Own PC 1.6K Help Choosing Parts 217 Graphics Cards 157 CPUs, Memory, and Motherboards 61 Cases and Power Supplies 19 Air and Liquid Cooling 11 Monitors and Displays 33 Peripherals 6 All Other Parts 17 Featured Categories We love seeing what our customers build Submit photos and a description of your PC to our build showcase Submit Now Looking for a little inspiration? See other custom PC builds and get some ideas for what can be done View Build Showcase View builds by: AMD Processors Intel Processors RTX 3090 RTX 3080 RTX 2080 Ti RTX 2080 Super RTX 2070 Super RTX 2070 RTX 2060 Super Radeon RX 5700XT Radeon RX 5700 Air Cooled Liquid Cooled SAME DAY CUSTOM BUILD SERVICE If You Can Dream it, We Can Build it. Services starting at $149.99 More Details Micro Center Homepage Desktops Laptops Computer Parts Computer Accessories Custom PC Builder Build Showcase Networking Electronics 3D Printing Service, Upgrades & Repairs Laptop Battery Replacement Laptop Screen Repair Virus and Malware Removal Hard Drive Recovery and Backup Apple MacBook Repair Custom Built PCs Schedule an Appointment © Vanilla Foundation Theme 2021 Powered By Vanilla Community Article Raspberry Pi Pico — Micro Center Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker {$smarty.capture.menu} Activity Categories Discussions Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker Home › General Discussion Raspberry Pi Pico baqwas ✭ March 28 edited June 3 in General Discussion Hello, Just noticed that the Raspberry Pi Pico is no longer listed when browsing the online catalog (irrespective of stock status). Is the Pico being dropped from from retail? Kind regards. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Comments Ian admin March 30 https://community.microcenter.com/discussion/8160/raspberry-pi-pico Greetings, I see the item is still listed on our website, it just appears stock is very limited at our stores at this time. https://www.microcenter.com/product/632771/raspberry-pi-pi-pico-microcontroller-development-board---based-on-the-raspberry-pi-dual-core-arm-cortex-m0-rp2040-processor,-up-to-133-mhz,-supports-c?storeid=029 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Categories 6.5K All Categories 994 The Blog 32 What's Trending 155 How to & Technical Guides 8 Computer Hardware 118 Software 3 Home Office 5 Networking Audio/Visual 1 Home Automation 15 3D Printers 5 Maker 14 PC Build Guides 76 Reviews & Buying Guides 23 Build Showcase 11 Contests 33 Past Contests 702 The Community 1.7K General Discussion 103 New Members 61 Consumer Tech 15 Prebuilt PCs and Laptops 71 Software 2 Audio/Visual 11 Networking & Security 1 Home Automation 2 Digital Photography 3 Content Creators 21 Hobby Boards & Projects 22 3D Printing 45 Retro Arcade/Gaming 77 All Other Tech 1.2K Store Information and Policy 46 Off Topic 5 Community Ideas & Feedback 109 Your Completed Builds 2.6K Build-Your-Own PC 1.6K Help Choosing Parts 217 Graphics Cards 157 CPUs, Memory, and Motherboards 61 Cases and Power Supplies 19 Air and Liquid Cooling 11 Monitors and Displays 33 Peripherals 6 All Other Parts 17 Featured Categories We love seeing what our customers build Submit photos and a description of your PC to our build showcase Submit Now Looking for a little inspiration? See other custom PC builds and get some ideas for what can be done View Build Showcase View builds by: AMD Processors Intel Processors RTX 3090 RTX 3080 RTX 2080 Ti RTX 2080 Super RTX 2070 Super RTX 2070 RTX 2060 Super Radeon RX 5700XT Radeon RX 5700 Air Cooled Liquid Cooled SAME DAY CUSTOM BUILD SERVICE If You Can Dream it, We Can Build it. Services starting at $149.99 More Details Micro Center Homepage Desktops Laptops Computer Parts Computer Accessories Custom PC Builder Build Showcase Networking Electronics 3D Printing Service, Upgrades & Repairs Laptop Battery Replacement Laptop Screen Repair Virus and Malware Removal Hard Drive Recovery and Backup Apple MacBook Repair Custom Built PCs Schedule an Appointment © Vanilla Foundation Theme 2021 Powered By Vanilla Community Article How to turn your Raspberry Pi Zero into a Webcam — Micro Center Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker {$smarty.capture.menu} Activity Categories Discussions Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker Home › Consumer Tech › Hobby Boards & Projects How to turn your Raspberry Pi Zero into a Webcam Minoso admin May 2020 edited June 2020 in Hobby Boards & Projects We all know how hard it can be sourcing a webcam right now, and while there are some alternatives like the Wyze Cam V2 we did a guide on, here’s another fun one, especially for those of you who are DIY inclined! In this guide we will work through converting a Raspberry Pi Zero into a webcam that you can plug in as if it were made to come that way. There are two different methods: a simple one using a pre-made kit Micro Center created, and a do-it-yourself guide for those of you who want see exactly how it all works The method using the pre-made image is the simpler of the two, because we have already created a custom Raspbian OS image with all the coding and setup done already for this purpose. Pretty much all you have to do is download it, write it to a microSD card, then put it all together and plug it in. Click here to be taken to the guide using our pre-made image The DIY guide is much more in depth, and will cover everything needed to do this from scratch. All the steps used in the DIY guide are what we used to make the custom image ourselves, so if you want to do all the coding and see how it works, you can take it step by step.  Click here to be taken to the DIY guide 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Comments TSTonyV admin June 2020 edited June 2020 How to set up the Raspberry Pi Zero W Webcam using our premade Image If you're new to Raspberry Pi doing something like this may seem a little daunting at first. As such, Micro Center decided to create a custom Raspbian image with everything already configured for you. You just need to assemble it, install the software, and you'll be good to go! Hardware you will need: Any Pi Zero model Pi camera Raspberry Pi Zero Case USB Type-A to Micro USB Type-B cable Windows PC SD card adapter (If your computer does not have one) microSD card Software you will need: Raspberry Pi Imager (Download and install) Custom Raspbian image (Save for later) Bonjour Services (Download and install) IP Camera Adapter (Download and install. Ignore any errors saying a module failed to install, just press ignore and finish the installation.) Preparing our custom image for the Pi: Note: Micro Center did have some pre-made kits available for purchase in store, with all the hardware included, along with a microSD card that already has the Raspbian image on it. If you purchased that kit, skip down to Assembling the Pi.  Insert the microSD card into your computer. You may need a USB microSD card reader if your system doesn’t have an SD card slot built-in Open Raspberry Pi Imager and select Choose OS Scroll to the bottom and choose Use custom. Navigate to where you downloaded our custom Raspbian image, select picam.zip and click open. Select your microSD card (MAKE SURE TO SELECT THE RIGHT ONE – Selecting the wrong one could result in data loss) Select Write, this will flash the microSD card and verify it. Once this process is done, you'll get a prompt letting you know it can be removed from the computer. Remove your SD card and insert it into your Pi. Assembling the Pi First we need to assemble everything. Our Pi case comes with a few swappable top pieces, but we are going to be using the top with a hole in the middle. 1. Take your Pi camera and detach the cable that comes with it. To do this, you must push up both sides as shown below. 2. Lightly pull the cable out. Now we need to insert the cable that came with our case. 3. Insert the larger side of the cable into the camera interface with the pins facing the same side as the camera. 4. Push the piece back down so that it locks the cable in place. 5. Now unlock the Pi’s camera interface and insert the smaller end of the cable. The pins should be facing the back side of the Pi. 6. Once we have the cable pushed in, lock it down as we did with the camera interface. Put in the microSD card, then we can insert our Pi into our case. (It may be a tight fit, that is normal). Insert it so the ports on the PI match up with the holes in the case. The Pi should lock in place and fit snug in our case by pushing it down, there are a few pegs that line up with the holes on each corner of the Pi. The cable may need to be bent to fit in, but don’t worry about that, the cables are made to handle this. Now grab the top we mentioned earlier and fit the camera into it. It will only fit one way, so once we have that seated, we can pull the top onto the pi to finish assembling the case. The final product should look like this before closing the lid.    7. We need to download IP Camera Adapter 3.1. Go to https://ip-webcam.appspot.com/ and click download, then run the .msi file it downloads. If it pops an error saying a module failed to install just press ignore and finish the installation. Now we just need to open it up and point it to our Pi. Type camera adapter into your taskbar and open Configure IP Camera Adapter 8. In the Camera feed URL, type or copy/paste raspberrypi.local:8080/?action=stream and click Apply and OK.  If this works, it’s time to test this out for real! Open up your app of choice.  If using Skype, make sure you download the standalone desktop client from https://www.skype.com/en/ (Microsoft Camera and other default Windows 10 apps cannot see our MJPEG camera device, so the built-in version of Skype in Windows 10 will not work). Make sure your camera is set to MJPEG Camera to show you the proper feed. Once set, you’ll see the Pi Camera and that’s it. Enjoy your webcam! 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook TSTonyV admin June 2020 edited June 2020 DIY Pi Zero Webcam Setup For those of you who want to learn how to do the setup yourself, this is a comprehensive guide that will walk you through all the steps to turn your Raspberry Pi Zero into a webcam. This is the same process we used to create the microSD cards in the pre-made bundle. We'll go over all the software and tools used, as well as how to configure the Raspbian OS properly to make it all work.  Hardware you will need: Any Pi Zero model Pi camera Raspberry Pi Zero Case USB Type-A to Micro USB Type-B cable Windows PC SD card adapter (If your computer does not have one) microSD card Software you will need: From your PC (we are using a PowerSpec running Windows 10 Pro for ours) navigate to https://downloads.raspberrypi.org/raspbian_lite_latest  and download Raspian Lite.  This will download a zip file containing the operating system for the Raspberry Pi Zero. We will be using Etcher to burn our Raspbian image to our microSD card. Etcher will work on Windows, Linux, and macOS and can be downloaded from here https://www.balena.io/etcher A video chat program that supports changing the camera (Skype, Zoom, Discord, etc).  You may also need  to download Bonjour services. If your system doesn’t have these installed you won’t be able to connect to the Pi Zero. Bonjour services can be downloaded here: https://download.info.apple.com/Mac_OS_X/061-8098.20100603.gthyu/BonjourPSSetup.exe Preparing the microSD card for the Pi: 1. Insert the microSD card into your computer. You may need a USB microSD card reader if your system doesn’t have an SD card slot built-in 2. Open Etcher and press Select image 3. Navigate to where you downloaded the Raspbian Lite image, select the .zip file and click open 4. Select your microSD card (MAKE SURE TO SELECT THE RIGHT ONE – Selecting the wrong one could result in data loss) 5. Click Flash! Then click OK on the User Account Control prompt. This may take a few minutes to complete depending on your hardware, maybe go grab a coffee while you wait.    6. Eject the microSD card/drive and re-insert it. 7. A new drive should appear called Boot.  If it does not automatically open, navigate to File Explorer or My Computer and open the drive (it should be listed on the left). We need to modify two specific files: cmdline.txt and config.txt Note:  If you are prompted to format the drive click cancel.  You may also be prompted telling you the drive is not accessible, if so hit OK.  8. Right-click and open config.txt with Wordpad and add this to the bottom: dtoverlay=dwc2. Make sure you save before you close it. Or… You can copy the snippet of code below and paste it in replacing what is in your file. # For more options and information see # http://rpf.io/configtxt # Some settings may impact device functionality. See link above for details # uncomment if you get no picture on HDMI for a default "safe" mode #hdmi_safe=1 # uncomment this if your display has a black border of unused pixels visible # and your display can output without overscan #disable_overscan=1 # uncomment the following to adjust overscan. Use positive numbers if console # goes off screen, and negative if there is too much border #overscan_left=16 #overscan_right=16 #overscan_top=16 #overscan_bottom=16 # uncomment to force a console size. By default it will be display's size minus # overscan. #framebuffer_width=1280 #framebuffer_height=720 # uncomment if hdmi display is not detected and composite is being output #hdmi_force_hotplug=1 # uncomment to force a specific HDMI mode (this will force VGA) #hdmi_group=1 #hdmi_mode=1 # uncomment to force a HDMI mode rather than DVI. This can make audio work in # DMT (computer monitor) modes #hdmi_drive=2 # uncomment to increase signal to HDMI, if you have interference, blanking, or # no display #config_hdmi_boost=4 # uncomment for composite PAL #sdtv_mode=2 #uncomment to overclock the arm. 700 MHz is the default. #arm_freq=800 # Uncomment some or all of these to enable the optional hardware interfaces #dtparam=i2c_arm=on #dtparam=i2s=on #dtparam=spi=on # Uncomment this to enable infrared communication. #dtoverlay=gpio-ir,gpio_pin=17 #dtoverlay=gpio-ir-tx,gpio_pin=18 # Additional overlays and parameters are documented /boot/overlays/README # Enable audio (loads snd_bcm2835) dtparam=audio=on [pi4] # Enable DRM VC4 V3D driver on top of the dispmanx display stack dtoverlay=vc4-fkms-v3d  max_framebuffers=2 console=serial0,115200 console=tty1 root=PARTUUID=738a4d67-02 rootfstype=ext4 elevator=deadline fsck.repair=yes rootwait modules-load=dwc2,g_ether [all] #dtoverlay=vc4-fkms-v3d dtoverlay=dwc2 9.   Next open up cmdline.txt and add this between rootwait and quiet: modules-load=dwc2,g_ether. Save and exit.  Note: If you do not see "quiet" you likely have booted this SD card in the pi.  Just add the code to the end like we did previously 10.   Make sure your folder view in File Explorer allows you to see file extensions. Go to View at the top and check “file name extensions.”   11.   Next, we need to create a new file called SSH With the Boot drive opened, right click anywhere within it, select new and select text document Name the new .txt file SSH, then make sure you delete the .txt extension after it. You’ll get a prompt saying if you change the file name extension, it may be unusable. That’s fine, click Yes to confirm the change. The file should just show as SSH now, this will allow us to connect via SSH once our Pi fully boots. (more on that later)   12.   Eject your microSD card and insert it into your Pi.  Setting up the Camera Now we need to assemble everything. Our Pi case comes with a few swappable top pieces, but we are going to be using the top with a hole in the middle. 13.  Take your Pi camera and detach the cable that comes with it. To do this, you must push up both sides as shown below. 14.   Lightly pull the cable out. Now we need to insert the cable that came with our case. 15.   Insert the larger side of the cable into the camera interface with the pins facing the same side as the camera. 16.   Push the piece back down so that it locks the cable in place. 17.   Now unlock the Pi’s camera interface and insert the smaller end of the cable. The pins should be facing the back side of the Pi. 18.   Once we have the cable pushed in, lock it down as we did with the camera interface.  Now we can insert our Pi into our case. (It may be a tight fit, that is normal). Insert it so the connectors match the ports on the case. The Pi should lock in place and fit snug in our case by pushing it down, there are a few pegs that line up with the holes on each corner of the Pi. The cable may need to be bent to fit in, but don’t worry about that, the cables are made to handle this. Now grab the top we mentioned earlier and fit the camera into it. It will only fit one way, so once we have that seated, we can pull the top onto the pi to finish assembling the case. The final product should look like this before closing the lid.    19.   Now it’s time to boot up our Pi for the first time. We need to plug our USB to microUSB cable into the computer and into our Pi. Since our Pi has two micro USB ports, we will be using the port closest to the middle so we can SSH into it from our computer. SSH is how we interface with the Pi over a data connection, think of it like a gateway to our terminal. Since Windows doesn’t have an SSH client, we will need to download one. The most common SSH client is known as Putty, and it can be downloaded here: https://the.earth.li/~sgtatham/putty/latest/w64/putty.exe  Make sure you save it somewhere you can easily access it, as this is not an installer, it’s a standalone .exe file so you can run it from anywhere. Once its downloaded, run it and you will see a screen like this:                                                                20. Yours will be empty if this is your first time opening it. First, we need to create a new connection. To do this, type a name for your pi into the saved sessions box, then type raspberrypi.local into the hostname box and click save. If done correctly you will see your new saved session below the saved sessions box.  21. Double click on the name you gave it and you should now be presented with a warning of a potential security breach.  This is normal to see if this is your first time connecting to your Pi. Once you click yes, it will not pop up again. Now it’s time to sign into your Pi. Raspbian’s default user is pi and default password is raspberry. While typing your password, it won’t show you anything on the screen. This is done for security reasons, so enter raspberry and press enter and you’ll be logged into your Pi. Now we need a network to continue. 22. With your Pi still powered on and connected to our computer, search in the taskbar for network status and open Network Status. You can also click your Start Button, go to Settings, then open Network and Internet and you’ll be in the status menu. Click Change adapter options and a new window will open up and show you all of your network adapters. One of them will have “USB Ethernet/RNDIS Gadget” under the name. Remember which connection show that because that is the connection to our Pi. My pi’s connection name is Ethernet 4 and my primary internet connection is named Ethernet 1. 23. Right click on your primary internet adapter and click properties. At the top you will see sharing. Click this and check the top box to allow other network users to connect through it and select your Pi’s connection. Click ok to close the window. Now unplug the pi and plug it back in. This will reboot your Pi and share your connection. This will also terminate our SSH session. For now, we will close Putty. Note: If you are familiar with Linux, you can bring the interface down and back up, but for the sake of simplicity, we will just unplug and plug it back in. 24. It may take up to 90 seconds for our Pi to fully reload. Open Putty again and double click our sessions name to log back in. Same details as last time, pi for username and raspberry for password.  Now we can move onto installing the required software. Type the following command and hit enter: sudo apt-get update && sudo apt-get install cmake git libjpeg8-dev -y 25. After our above command finishes, we need to type and run sudo raspi-config and navigate to interfacing options. Select Camera and enable it. Navigate to finish and press enter to save everything. It will ask to reboot, select yes and let it reboot, then restart Putty.  26. Now we need to get mjpg-streamer. We will be using this to stream our webcam via our network on the Pi. Run the following command: git clone https://github.com/jacksonliam/mjpg-streamer 27. Once that finishes, run this command: cd mjpg-streamer/mjpg-streamer-experimental && make && sudo make install  28. Once that command finishes, we need to run a test to ensure it works. While in the ~/mjpg-streamer/mjpg-streamer/experimental directory, run this command: mjpg_streamer -i input_uvc.so -o output_http.so 29. If you see a red light on your camera, you’re live! It’s time to set it up so our camera starts automatically when we plug in the Pi. We need to first close out of our running stream. To do this, hold down ctrl and press C. Wait a few minutes and you should see our [email protected]:~ $ line again. If not, hold ctrl and press Z to get back to that line. 30. Now we need to make a script to run at startup. Type and run nano ~/cam.sh, then paste in the following. #!/bin/bash cd /home/pi/mjpg-streamer/mjpg-streamer-experimental mjpg_streamer -i input_uvc.so -o output_http.so Make sure the lines match up exactly as they are listed here. Now hold ctrl and press X. It will ask if you wish to save, press y for yes and enter to save and close. 31. Run the command chmod +x ~/cam.sh , then run the command crontab -e 32. It will ask which editor you prefer, press 1 for nano and enter to confirm. Now you will see our Pi user’s crontab. At the top, press enter to make a new line, and add PATH=~/bin:/usr/bin/:/bin:/usr/local/bin/, then go to the bottom of the file and enter @reboot /home/pi/cam.sh, like so:  PATH=~/bin:/usr/bin/:/bin:/usr/local/bin/ # Edit this file to introduce tasks to be run by cron. # # Each task to run has to be defined through a single line # indicating with different fields when the task will be run # and what command to run for the task # # To define the time you can provide concrete values for # minute (m), hour (h), day of month (dom), month (mon), # and day of week (dow) or use '*' in these fields (for 'any'). # # Notice that tasks will be started based on the cron's system # daemon's notion of time and timezones. # # Output of the crontab jobs (including errors) is sent through # email to the user the crontab file belongs to (unless redirected). # # For example, you can run a backup of all your user accounts # at 5 a.m every week with: # 0 5 * * 1 tar -zcf /var/backups/home.tgz /home/ # # For more information see the manual pages of crontab(5) and cron(8) # # m h  dom mon dow   command @reboot /home/pi/cam.sh 33. Just like our cam file, hold ctrl and press X, then hit y and enter to save and exit. Now we just need to reboot the pi to confirm it works. Run sudo reboot and wait for it to reboot. In about 30 seconds, your camera should light up red again. This means our script works and now we can work on getting our camera streaming to our PC. 34. We need to download IP Camera Adapter 3.1. Go to https://ip-webcam.appspot.com/ and click download, then run the .msi file it downloads. If it pops an error saying a module failed to install just press ignore and finish the installation. Now we just need to open it up and point it to our Pi. Type Camera into your taskbar and open Configure IP Camera Adapter 35. Now in the Camera feed URL, enter raspberrypi.local:8080/?action=stream and click Apply and OK.  If this works, it’s time to test this out for real! Open up your app of choice.  If using Skype, make sure you download the standalone desktop client from https://www.skype.com/en/ (Microsoft Camera and other default Windows 10 apps cannot see our MJPEG camera device, so the built-in version of Skype in Windows 10 will not work). Make sure your camera is set to MJPEG Camera to show you the proper feed. Once set, you’ll see the Pi Camera and that’s it. Enjoy your webcam!   1 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook TS_JosephF admin July 2020 We also have another Raspberry Pi article on our forum. Be sure to check it out! 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