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Community Article HDCP 2.2 compliant motherboard and Intel CPU — Micro Center Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker {$smarty.capture.menu} Activity Categories Discussions Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker Home › CPUs, Memory, and Motherboards HDCP 2.2 compliant motherboard and Intel CPU frankpc ✭ September 23 in CPUs, Memory, and Motherboards Where can I find motherboards and cpu's that are HDCP 2.2 compliant? I am wanting to upgrade my HTPC and I'm currently using a Gigabyte GA-Z170X-Gaming 7 and a i5 Skylake processor. I haven't found any motherboards that list HDCP 2.2 as a feature. Thank you 🤔 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Comments TSMikeW admin September 23 @frankpc I believe Intel IGP's started supporting HDCP 2.0 on the 610/620/630 IGP's, Kayblake. One generation above where you are now. If you can find one, you can keep your motherboard so long as you update the BIOS. https://www.intel.com/content/www/us/en/support/articles/000032112/graphics/graphics-for-7th-generation-intel-processors.html 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook TSMichaelB admin September 23 Yeah, @TSMikeW is correct here. This was a big deal when Netflix launched their 4K streaming requirement and HDCP 2.2 was one of the big hurdles. Depending on whether your HTPC supports a dGPU or not, you can also look towards buying a cheap GT 1030 GPU as these would support HDCP 2.2: https://www.microcenter.com/product/508643/msi-nvidia-geforce-gt-1030-2gd4-lp-overclocked-single-fan-2gb-gddr4-pcie-30-graphics-card https://www.nvidia.com/en-us/geforce/graphics-cards/gt-1030/specifications/ Finding a Kaby Lake CPU for your motherboard might not be easy as you'd have to gamble on the used market for a processor that wasn't abused with overclocking or delidding (which was pretty common on Kaby Lake due to the lack of IHS soldering). 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook frankpc ✭ September 24 Thank you folks. Interesting !! One problem I have with my current Gigabyte motherboard is that it just doesn't fully support Windows 10. Whenever, a windows 10 update occurs, I have to change the audio and video drivers back to 2015 versions that were actually Windows 7 drivers. If I don't do that, I cannot get DTS-HD. Crazy!! And I can't get 3D video. So, I was hoping to upgrade the motherboard to circumvent that issue as well as get the HDCP 2.2 support. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Ian admin September 28 https://community.microcenter.com/discussion/comment/36336#Comment_36336 Sorry for the delay in response. We no longer carry motherboards anymore for the Skylake era unfortunately. It is a few generations old now by Intel standards so they are discontinued. You might be able to find one third party/used online but we don't have a specific recommendation. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Categories 7K All Categories 1K The Blog 33 What's Trending 167 How to & Technical Guides 11 Computer Hardware 119 Software 3 Home Office 6 Networking Audio/Visual 2 Home Automation 16 3D Printers 10 Maker 16 PC Build Guides 96 Reviews & Buying Guides 34 Build Showcase 17 Contests 39 Past Contests 1K The Community 1.8K General Discussion 108 New Members 127 Consumer Tech 42 Prebuilt PCs and Laptops 78 Software 4 Audio/Visual 13 Networking & Security 1 Home Automation 2 Digital Photography 3 Content Creators 22 Hobby Boards & Projects 26 3D Printing 53 Retro Arcade/Gaming 86 All Other Tech 1.3K Store Information and Policy 51 Off Topic 5 Community Ideas & Feedback 113 Your Completed Builds 2.7K Build-Your-Own PC 1.7K Help Choosing Parts 225 Graphics Cards 172 CPUs, Memory, and Motherboards 62 Cases and Power Supplies 19 Air and Liquid Cooling 16 Monitors and Displays 30 Peripherals 10 All Other Parts 22 Featured Categories We love seeing what our customers build Submit photos and a description of your PC to our build showcase Submit Now Looking for a little inspiration? See other custom PC builds and get some ideas for what can be done View Build Showcase View builds by: AMD Processors Intel Processors RTX 3090 RTX 3080 RTX 2080 Ti RTX 2080 Super RTX 2070 Super RTX 2070 RTX 2060 Super Radeon RX 5700XT Radeon RX 5700 Air Cooled Liquid Cooled SAME DAY CUSTOM BUILD SERVICE If You Can Dream it, We Can Build it. Services starting at $149.99 More Details Micro Center Homepage Desktops Laptops Computer Parts Computer Accessories Custom PC Builder Build Showcase Networking Electronics 3D Printing Service, Upgrades & Repairs Laptop Battery Replacement Laptop Screen Repair Virus and Malware Removal Hard Drive Recovery and Backup Apple MacBook Repair Custom Built PCs Schedule an Appointment © Vanilla Foundation Theme 2021 Powered By Vanilla Community Article PowerSpec G152 [Intel i5-7500] CPU upgrade — Micro Center Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker {$smarty.capture.menu} Activity Categories Discussions Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker Home › CPUs, Memory, and Motherboards PowerSpec G152 [Intel i5-7500] CPU upgrade Aseph ✭ October 14 in CPUs, Memory, and Motherboards Can the Intel i5-7500 CPU be upgraded in a PowerSpec G152, if so, what would be compatible?   0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Answers Ian admin October 15 edited October 15 Hello, yes, you can change the processor in that PC. To work with the motherboard in that system, you would be looking for another Kaby Lake / 8th generation Intel processor. It may be difficult to locate a replacement for those as they have been discontinued by Intel and would no longer be sold by Micro Center. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Categories 7K All Categories 1K The Blog 33 What's Trending 167 How to & Technical Guides 11 Computer Hardware 119 Software 3 Home Office 6 Networking Audio/Visual 2 Home Automation 16 3D Printers 10 Maker 16 PC Build Guides 96 Reviews & Buying Guides 34 Build Showcase 17 Contests 39 Past Contests 1K The Community 1.8K General Discussion 108 New Members 127 Consumer Tech 42 Prebuilt PCs and Laptops 78 Software 4 Audio/Visual 13 Networking & Security 1 Home Automation 2 Digital Photography 3 Content Creators 22 Hobby Boards & Projects 26 3D Printing 53 Retro Arcade/Gaming 86 All Other Tech 1.3K Store Information and Policy 51 Off Topic 5 Community Ideas & Feedback 113 Your Completed Builds 2.7K Build-Your-Own PC 1.7K Help Choosing Parts 225 Graphics Cards 172 CPUs, Memory, and Motherboards 62 Cases and Power Supplies 19 Air and Liquid Cooling 16 Monitors and Displays 30 Peripherals 10 All Other Parts 22 Featured Categories We love seeing what our customers build Submit photos and a description of your PC to our build showcase Submit Now Looking for a little inspiration? See other custom PC builds and get some ideas for what can be done View Build Showcase View builds by: AMD Processors Intel Processors RTX 3090 RTX 3080 RTX 2080 Ti RTX 2080 Super RTX 2070 Super RTX 2070 RTX 2060 Super Radeon RX 5700XT Radeon RX 5700 Air Cooled Liquid Cooled SAME DAY CUSTOM BUILD SERVICE If You Can Dream it, We Can Build it. Services starting at $149.99 More Details Micro Center Homepage Desktops Laptops Computer Parts Computer Accessories Custom PC Builder Build Showcase Networking Electronics 3D Printing Service, Upgrades & Repairs Laptop Battery Replacement Laptop Screen Repair Virus and Malware Removal Hard Drive Recovery and Backup Apple MacBook Repair Custom Built PCs Schedule an Appointment © Vanilla Foundation Theme 2021 Powered By Vanilla Community Article How do I tell what model/version of an SSD will work with my PC? — Micro Center Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker {$smarty.capture.menu} Activity Categories Discussions Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker Home › Consumer Tech › All Other Tech How do I tell what model/version of an SSD will work with my PC? NeveroddoreveN ✭ September 6 in All Other Tech I am trying to upgrade my PCs hard drive, and decided to purchase a new SSD. But I was told that only certain models of SSD will work with certain manufacturers/PC models. How do I discern what SSD will work with my PC? 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Answers Sinister Michigan ✭ September 7 Hmmm, I am unsure who told you this. Well, actually if your pc does not have a m.2 slot then no a m.2 ssd will not work, any ssd should work if its 2.5in standard. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook NeveroddoreveN ✭ September 7 I really do apologize, I don't know much about computers. Can you give a bit more explanation on m.2 slot and 2.5in standard? I am quite eager to do my upgrades, I would also be in the market for other upgrades to my PC as well. Any help, guidance or suggestions are more than welcome!! 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Ian admin September 7 Hello! We would be able to assist you with more information about your PC. What brand/model of PC do you have or what brand/model of motherboard is this for? Thank you! 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook NeveroddoreveN ✭ September 7 My PC is a HP Omen, System Model 870-281. (Side Note: I am also interested in upgrading other parts of my PC). 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Ian admin September 7 Hello, I found this regarding your PC that lists all the parts / specs typically found in that model - https://support.hp.com/us-en/document/c05408558 Looks like it has 2 m.2 slots based on this motherboard description. Any brand of m.2 drive would work if you wanted to add an m.2 drive, doesn't have to be specific to brand or anything, the same would apply for a 2.5" or 3.5" hard drive. You can find other part upgrade information on this HP support website page as well. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook NeveroddoreveN ✭ September 7 Awesome!! Thanks so much!! If I have anymore questions, should I post them here or start a new Microcenter conversation? 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook NeveroddoreveN ✭ September 7 Oh, I took a look at the link you sent me, I see the specs for my PC, but where is the link/page for computer parts that would be compatible for my PC? 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Ian admin September 8 https://community.microcenter.com/discussion/comment/35935#Comment_35935 Are you just looking to add an SSD or other parts? 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook NeveroddoreveN ✭ September 8 Well, right now I am focusing on new SSD drive, it would be convenient, but I am curious as to what else I can upgrade. I prefer to have my computer running at full capacity (I am an avid gamer), so I am curious. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Ian admin September 9 https://community.microcenter.com/discussion/comment/35948#Comment_35948 For upgrades for your PC, to install a newer processor/motherboard that is currently sold/produced, you would need to change the motherboard to something that can support the processor. The 7700k currently installed came at the end of a generation (Kaby Lake), there isn't really a better processor you could get without changing the board. If you wanted to The RAM could carry over to a new motherboard. Something to note with changing the motherboard, your Windows key is going to be most likely tied to the old board so you may have to purchase a new Windows key if you do that. The SSD you can add a 2.5' drive or an SSD, either should be fine. You would want to ensure the case has an open slot for a 2.5" drive if you go that route. With the power supply only being 500 W's, you would have to change that if you were interested in a 3000-series video card by NVIDIA or one of the new AMD cards as they typically require a bit more power than what you have right now. Please let us know if you have any other questions! 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Categories 7K All Categories 1K The Blog 34 What's Trending 167 How to & Technical Guides 11 Computer Hardware 119 Software 3 Home Office 6 Networking Audio/Visual 2 Home Automation 16 3D Printers 10 Maker 16 PC Build Guides 96 Reviews & Buying Guides 34 Build Showcase 17 Contests 39 Past Contests 1K The Community 1.7K General Discussion 83 New Members 127 Consumer Tech 42 Prebuilt PCs and Laptops 78 Software 4 Audio/Visual 13 Networking & Security 1 Home Automation 2 Digital Photography 3 Content Creators 22 Hobby Boards & Projects 26 3D Printing 53 Retro Arcade/Gaming 86 All Other Tech 1.3K Store Information and Policy 51 Off Topic 6 Community Ideas & Feedback 113 Your Completed Builds 2.7K Build-Your-Own PC 1.7K Help Choosing Parts 227 Graphics Cards 172 CPUs, Memory, and Motherboards 62 Cases and Power Supplies 19 Air and Liquid Cooling 16 Monitors and Displays 30 Peripherals 10 All Other Parts 22 Featured Categories We love seeing what our customers build Submit photos and a description of your PC to our build showcase Submit Now Looking for a little inspiration? See other custom PC builds and get some ideas for what can be done View Build Showcase View builds by: AMD Processors Intel Processors RTX 3090 RTX 3080 RTX 2080 Ti RTX 2080 Super RTX 2070 Super RTX 2070 RTX 2060 Super Radeon RX 5700XT Radeon RX 5700 Air Cooled Liquid Cooled SAME DAY CUSTOM BUILD SERVICE If You Can Dream it, We Can Build it. Services starting at $149.99 More Details Micro Center Homepage Desktops Laptops Computer Parts Computer Accessories Custom PC Builder Build Showcase Networking Electronics 3D Printing Service, Upgrades & Repairs Laptop Battery Replacement Laptop Screen Repair Virus and Malware Removal Hard Drive Recovery and Backup Apple MacBook Repair Custom Built PCs Schedule an Appointment © Vanilla Foundation Theme 2021 Powered By Vanilla Community Article Intel Memory Overclocking & Performance Tuning Guide — Micro Center Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker {$smarty.capture.menu} Activity Categories Discussions Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker Home › CPUs, Memory, and Motherboards Intel Memory Overclocking & Performance Tuning Guide MageTank ✭ June 9 edited June 9 in CPUs, Memory, and Motherboards Contents (Page 1) Introduction (Page 2) Overclocking & Performance Validation (Page 3) Stress Testing & Stability Validation (Page 4) Conclusion Part 1: Introduction Welcome to my Intel memory overclocking & performance tuning guide. This guide will cover how to overclock your memory for the best performance and validate stability while doing so. There is a lot of information to cover so we will break this up into several parts to make the information easier to consume. Before we begin, let me answer a few questions you may have. What is overclocking? Overclocking is the act of increasing the performance of your components beyond that of their original specifications through various tweaks. For memory, this can be changes in both frequency AND timings. My memory has an XMP (Extreme Memory Profile), is this an overclock? Depending on the specific configuration of the profile, an XMP profile can be considered an overclock. Why would I want to overclock my memory if I already have an XMP profile? While XMP profiles offer a decent performance boost with little effort, they still leave a lot of performance on the table and XMP profiles are often not compatible with every CPU/motherboard configuration. A hand-tuned overclock will not only outperform an XMP profile, but will be far more compatible and tailor-made to your specific CPU/motherboard configuration. I hear overclocking is dangerous. Am I going to destroy my hardware by doing this? There are always risks when you force hardware to operate outside of their original specifications. With that said, memory is quite resilient and the information provided in this guide will include voltage values that are still within spec for both the memory and processor. As long as you do not deviate from these voltage values, the risk of harm to your memory should be no greater than an XMP overclock while offering a nice performance boost. With those questions out of the way, let's move on to a brief summary on some of the terminology we will be using throughout the guide. General Terminology: These are common words & phrases we will use throughout to describe your memory, motherboard slots and various memory-related technologies. RAM: Random Access Memory. This is the proper description of what desktop memory is. DIMM: Dual In-Line Memory Module. This is the correct terminology used to describe your "RAM Stick" or memory module. DIMM Slot: This is the correct choice of words used to describe the memory slots on your motherboard. IMC (Integrated Memory Controller): This is the portion of your processor responsible for controlling your memory. JEDEC: This stands for "Joint Electron Device Engineering Council". This group is responsible for defining the standards of memory speed. When we reference "JEDEC" in this guide, we are referring to "stock" values or those defined by standard specifications. Voltages: There are a few different voltages we will need to pay attention to and adjust in order to stabilize our overclocks. These include: VDIMM (Sometimes called VDDQ or DRAM Voltage): This voltage is supplied from your motherboard directly to your memory DIMM's. VCCIO: This is the voltage for the path going into and out of the IMC. VCCSA (Sometimes called System Agent Voltage: This is your IMC and PCIe subdomain voltage. For DDR3, typical voltages are 1.35v (DDR3L), 1.5v (JEDEC DDR3), and 1.65v (OC'd DDR3). Intel's max recommended voltage for DDR3 on Sandy/Ivy/Haswell, is 1.5v +5%, which is 1.575v. For DDR4, typical voltages are 1.2v (JEDEC DDR4), and 1.35v (OC'd DDR4). Intel's max recommended voltage for Skylake's DDR4 half of it's IMC is 1.2v + 5%, which is 1.26v. For the DDR3 half of Skylake's IMC, it's 1.35v + 5% which is 1.4175v. It is important to note that these are voltage recommendations, not requirements. Exceeding these voltages isn't inherently dangerous, it simply means that longevity has not been tested at voltages beyond what is specified. If you'd like to read my thoughts regarding these voltages and their "safety", click the spoiler below: Spoiler Spoiler Warning ▲ ▼ To address the giant elephant in the room: Yes, Intel said going above 1.35v will damage the IMC. You know what else Intel said? Going above 1.5v on Haswell would damage it's IMC. Don't believe me? Here's their own whitesheets: Skylake: http://www.intel.com/content/www/us/en/processors/core/desktop-6th-gen-core-family-datasheet-vol-1.html (Go to page 116) Haswell: http://www.intel.com/content/www/us/en/processors/core/4th-gen-core-family-desktop-vol-1-datasheet.html (Go to page 103) You will see this for Skylake: https://i.imgur.com/uiwroiy.jpg Notice how it says Max VDDQ (VDIMM) = 1.35 +5%? This means your max "safe" VDIMM is 1.4175v. Pretty scary, huh? Now let's look at Haswell: https://i.imgur.com/zI4SYO0.jpg Max is 1.5 + 5%. This means 1.575v is the max "save" VDIMM. Now tell me, how many people do you know of that ran 1.65v kits on their Haswell CPU's for years, without any issues? Under load, you typically see spikes of 1.7v on VDIMM on those kits. A massive 13.4% increase over their "safe" number. Meanwhile, 1.5v is only 11.2% over Skylakes "safe" number. To further put this myth to rest, I've been running 1.65v memory on a Core i5 6600T for several years now, and nothing has happened. No degradation, no random crashes, nothing. Chip still overclocks fine at 4.59ghz, and the memory itself is a super tight 2133 C9 kit with tight tertiaries. If anything, that IMC is under heavier stress than any normal XMP profile could ever provide.  My point is, Intel's standards are silly. We've all broken them in the past, and nothing bad happened then. Why everyone makes a big deal out of it, simply because it's Skylake/Kaby Lake/Coffee Lake, etc, is beyond me. Besides, I run my 3600 C14 DDR4 kit at 1.4v, which spikes to 1.44v under load. This is already outside of Intel's safe specs, and it's also doing just fine. If VDIMM could kill a CPU, i'd be the first to know.  For VCCIO/VCCSA, I do not recommend exceeding a value of 1.25v for each. I personally use a value of 1.14v for VCCIO, and 1.15v for VCCSA. Going beyond 1.25v is silly, and may potentially damage your IMC or traces on your board. Primary Timings: These are timings that are normally listed on every sales page of your ram. They include: CAS Latency (tCL) RAS to CAS delay (tRCD) Row Precharge Time (tRP) RAS Active Time (tRAS) Command Rate (CR) (Note: Command Rate is not a timing, but it's listed under Primary Timings, so I included it here) They are also commonly available to tinker on most chipsets, and are often made available for tuning in software like XTU. Secondary Timings: These are timings that are seldom ever listed anywhere on a marketing page, but you can find them within your BIOS on some chipsets. They include: Write Recovery Time (tWR) Refresh Cycle Time (tRFC) RAS to RAS Delay Long (tRDD_L) RAS to RAS Delay Short (tRDD_S) Write to Read Delay Long (tWTR_L) Write to Read Delay Short (tWTR_S) Read to Precharge (tRTP) Four Active Window (tFAW) CAS Write Latency (tCWL) Most of these timings are inaccessible on lower-end chipsets and more restrictive BIOS's. Very rarely will you have access to them on lower-end configurations, and even XTU lacks control over most of these timings. Tertiary Timings: These are timings that are NEVER listed anywhere on a marketing page, and are different per motherboard/CPU IMC/ ram IC. They are generated by your IMC, after your board probes it repeatedly looking for a stable configuration. Some of you might have noticed your PC restarting a few times when installing new memory kits. These timings are often the cause of that, as they need special training in order for you to post properly. They include: tCKE tRDRD (_SG, _DG, _DD, _DR) tRDWR (_SG, _DG, _DD, _DR) tWRRD (_SG, _DG, _DD, _DR) tWRWR (_SG, _DG, _DD, _DR) SG = Same Group, DG = Different Group, DD = Different DIMM, DR = Different Rank. Very specific boards and chipsets will allow modification of these timings. They are by far one of the most important groups of timings you can adjust and are directly involved in improving your bandwidth efficiency. More on that later. Round Trip Latency: Since these settings are not timings, and are not always listed under tertiary timings, I feel they need their own section, as they are probably the single most important settings you can adjust to see the biggest impact on performance. They include two settings: RTL (the title of this section should give you hints as to what this is) IO-L As the title of this section hints at, Round Trip Latency is directly involved in how long it takes your ram to complete it's total cycles. The tighter this value is, the lower your overall latency is. Sounds great, right? Well, the problem is: literally every timing is associated with this setting, and tightening other settings, makes it harder to tighten this. It's also annoying to adjust, as you cannot adjust it without also adjusting IO-L settings (the two must be adjusted as a pair) and there is no secret formula for doing so. All I can tell you is: your RTL channels cannot be more than 1 apart in either direction. Example: If RTL of Channel A is 50, RTL of Channel B can be 51 or 49. It cannot be 52 or 48, as this will result in extremely terrible performance, or worse, system instability. With the introduction out of the way, we can move on to why you are here... 1 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Comments MageTank ✭ June 9 edited June 9 Part 2: Overclocking & Performance Validation Preparation: The very first thing I advise you do, is locate your CLEAR_CMOS button on your motherboard (if you have one) or put your system in a location that adjusting your CMOS jumpers/battery is easily accessible. You are certainly going to be using them, no exceptions. Next be sure to have your power supply's power cable near you. Sometimes, removing this and holding down the power button for 60 seconds, results in enough of a clear to allow you to get back into BIOS without completely resetting everything. Lastly, save all of your "pseudo-stable" profiles, so that you can continue to adjust them for better stability without starting over. It's important to keep in mind that the information provided below based on an ASRock board but is universally applicable to all Intel-based motherboards. The names of certain timings/settings might differ slightly, but their functions will be identical. If you have questions during this process, feel free to comment down below.   Overclocking Time!: Now that we have the preparations out of the way, it's time to start tinkering. I recommend focusing on Frequency first, while keeping your primary timings the same. I personally dial in a vDIMM of 1.35v, and then I start increasing my memory frequency one memory strap at a time. If I was at 3000 C15, I would try 3200 C15, then 3333 C15, 3466 C15, and so on. When you reach a point to where it no longer posts, you have 3 options. Option 1: Throw more voltage at it. Option 2: Loosen your primary timings. Option 3: settle for last bootable configuration.    I advise trying option 1 first, as it might only take a little bit more vDIMM to make it stable. For example: My 3600 C14 profile is unstable at 1.35v, but stable at 1.39v. With modern XMP kits now launching at up to 1.5V on DDR4, this is still quite tame and most DIMM's will be perfectly fine with even bare minimum airflow at this voltage. Now, your VRM components near your ram on the motherboard, that's a different story entirely. Use common sense, and try to avoid going over 1.55v for 24/7 vDIMM and you should be fine.   Option 2 is what we call "compromising". You have to be careful when making compromises on timings for speed. The end must justify the means. If you gain a slight amount of bandwidth, but lose on latency at all, it's a bad trade. Memory is already so ridiculously fast in regards to bandwidth, that latency should ALWAYS come first in your mind. That being said, frequency can be just as good for latency as it is with bandwidth. It just takes a little balance. If you increase frequency while keeping timings the same, latency improves. If you loosen latency while increasing bandwidth, one of two things can happen: You have faster bandwidth, and latency remains the same as a result. This is a good trade with no negative side effects, so I tend to allow this. You gain bandwidth, but latency suffers. This is a terrible trade, and should never be made. Go back to your last configuration, and work on making that stable instead. When making minor tweaks, I recommend using software like Aida64's memory bandwidth test (cachemem test) to see your gains in performance. Yes, I know it sucks using paid software, but it seriously helps with knowing whether or not your timings are making a positive or negative impact in performance. If you choose not to purchase AIDA64 or do not see yourself using the features often, you can use the individual benchmarks on the left hand side to get an idea of how your memory is performing. Still, if you want to be serious about this, I strongly urge you to consider this software. Outside of memory overclocking it has other fantastic features and it never hurts to support software developers.   Now that we've gotten frequency and primary timings taken care of, it's time for secondary timings. While you will see small gains from most of these timings, I want to focus on one very important secondary timing. tRFC. You see, memory is a matrix of billions of capacitors that need to be recharged. You have tRFC, a secondary timing, that works alongside tREFI, a tertiary timing. Every , they are recharged in order, for amount of time. Simply put: tRFC is the amount of time your ram can do nothing, while being recharged. tREFI = the amount of time your ram can do things, before needing recharged. Both are very important, and have significant impact on your latency. tRFC works best as low as you can get it, and tREFI functions best as high as you can get it. tRFC, for most people, is best left at 270, as it's the easiest value to keep stable while having the best gains in performance. tREFI on the other hand, can go as high as 65535 and provide much lower memory latency, but can potentially lead to corruption if your motherboard's quality is lackluster. The warmer your DIMMS, the more often they need recharged. If motherboard is bad, it can't recharge high enough to meet the required interval. Basically, if motherboard is bad, stick to the JEDEC standard of 7.8usec refresh interval. If your ram is 3000mhz, the formula is 1500 x 7.8 = 11700. If your ram is 3600mhz, the formula would be 1800 x 7.8 = 14040 tREFI.   There are other formula's for your secondary timings worth following, such as: tFAW = tRRD x 4. The others, they tend to take trial and error. Gain's can be small, or big, depending on whether or not you are using DDR3 or DDR4. I can say that with DDR4, the gains are not as massive as touching tertiary timings. Speaking of which...   Tertiary timings. Depending on your level of masochism, this will be the part you love the most, or absolutely dread. There is no in-between. As you saw above during the terminology half, tertiary timings tend to have a few suffixes after their name. These are SG, DG, DD, and DR. As for DD, these are related to 2DPC (DIMMS Per Channel) and only matter if you have 2 DIMMS per channel (ITX users rejoice, less complication) while DR matters when using multi-rank kits. It's easier to associate DR with "Dual Rank". If you have a single rank kit, touching _DR timings does literally nothing. No positive or negative, and no instability issues either. I recommend taking these one at a time, or at the very least, one group at a time. Focus on tRDRD (and all of it's suffixes), followed by tRDWR, and so on. Fun fact about tRDWR: these timings directly impact AVX. The tighter they are, the hotter AVX is. The looser they are, the cooler AVX is. Those of you that fear AVX, you might be able to use this to your advantage, and make those stress tests easier on yourself. I promise not to judge you. Once you've finally settled on your tertiary timings, and have gone through countless hours of stress tests, it's time for the bane of my existence. RTL/IO-L's. I honestly cannot give you any better advice, other than "You gotta feel it". There is no magical value that I can tell you to dial in, and have it work. RTL has one very specific value it likes, and a few others that it "tolerates", and that's it. Either it works, trains poorly, or doesn't work at all. Now, with DDR4, we do have a trick up our sleeves to at least prevent it from training poorly. It's a very simple formula for a specific setting called "RTL Init". This formula is: IO-L + IO-L Offset + CL (x2) + 10. Let's say your IO-L is 4, and your offset is 21. You have a CAS Latency of 14. The formula would be: 4 + 21 + 14 (x2) + 10 = 63. Once you input 63 in the RTL Init setting, your IMC will no longer train RTL's beyond it's current threshold. This is great, as it at least prevents performance from getting worse. However, this is only a band-aid. You should still strive to find optimal settings for RTL/IO-L. That being said, do not beat yourself up dwelling on this. If you've gained significant strides in all other aspects of your ram, then feel proud of what you've accomplished. It's still worlds beyond what XMP can offer you, and you've gotten one step closer to mastering one of the most difficult "overclocking disciplines" there is. 1 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook MageTank ✭ June 9 edited June 9 Part 3: Stress Testing & Stability Validation This part is always met with some sort of controversy, as everyone has their own way of doing things. That being said, I too have my own way, and it's the only way I've ever done it, so I'll have to stick by what I know. When making adjustments in your BIOS for timings or frequency, I always recommend running a full pass of memtest86. Memtest86 is not a stress test, but it will test things that can potentially show your IMC not liking your current memory configuration. I use it as a precursor to actual memory stress testing, as it helps prevent instant crashing in Windows due to IMC outright hating your memory configuration. We use memtest86 in two phases:    Phase 1: Full Pass Phase 2: IMC Smackdown.   Phase 1 is pretty self explanatory. It's running memtest86, using all 13 tests. Phase 2 is where the fun begins, as we disable all tests excluding test 6, and run it several times. I personally do 10 runs of test 6, but feel free to do however many you wish to do. It will test different rows and addresses with each subsequent test, so the more you run it, the better your chances are for finding IMC/RAM incompatibility. This phase is critical when making adjustments to tertiary timings, as this test will find issues quicker than any other. When using Memtest86, make sure you hit C, and select "All Cores: Parallel". This will make the test go much quicker. Believe me, you will want to save as much time as you can, as memory overclocking takes a long time to validate 100% stability.   Next, we have my tool of choice for basically all forms of stress testing, Prime95. I know, some of you are scared when you see this come up. In fact, pretty sure I felt someone's heartbeat increase somewhere in the world due to the sheer mention of it. Relax. For this purpose, Prime95 is going to be 100% harmless. In fact, we won't be using an FFT size small enough for it to get hot, so you should be fine. If you are absolutely terrified, feel free to use the non-AVX version, as it shouldn't matter for ram stability (unless you are stress testing specific AVX-based tertiary timings, such as tRDWR_DD/DR, but more on that later. For now, let's focus on how to stress it. Open up Prime95 of your choice (I am currently using 28.10 as of this guide) and input the following settings: (Do note: Number of threads should be equivalent to the amount of threads available on your processor. For example, if you have an Intel 11700K, you would input 16 threads due to SMT/Hyperthreading) Now, for "Memory To Use", make sure you enter your own value. I highly recommend 75% of your total capacity. If you have say, 16GB, then your capacity = 16 x 1024 - 25% = 12288MB. For 8GB, that value would be 6144MB. Since I have 32GB, I'll be using 24576 to stress test. Once this starts, let it run for several hours. I personally let mine run for about 8-12 hours, depending on how I feel and how much I've tinkered from my last stable profile, but I do not recommend running for less than 8 hours. I know it's tempting to cut corners, but memory instability is not a game you want to play. It can seriously corrupt your windows installation, and require a fresh install. Take this part seriously.   As for why we use the settings above, allow me to explain. 512k-1024k is hard on the IMC and IO lanes. 2048k+ is hard on your ram. By setting the range at 512-4096, we not only stress the IMC and IO Lanes, we also stress the memory itself. Be warned: 1344k and 2688k are also included in this range, and are the hardest stress on vCore. If your CPU is unstable by any means, it will fail this, and will likely hold you back on memory overclocking. Always make sure your CPU is 100% stable before attempting memory overclocking. The less variables involved, the better. For those of you with Haswell, and worried about that old myth of Prime95 killing CPU's, understand this. This range lacks 448k, which was the hardest FFT to test on FIVR. You should be fine here. If the idea of Prime95 is still off-putting, you can use HCI Memtest and test 95% of your memory capacity to 200% or TestMem5 but I don't have too much experience with these tests so I can't really give you much advise on using them. The goal is to make sure your system is stable to meet your needs and I'd recommend erring on the side of caution here. You can never be "too stable". As for when you should test for stability, that's entirely up to you. I like to overclock in small chunks so I'll start by creating a stable foundation and then tweak that slowly in small groups, stressing again to make sure it can be stabilized before wasting too much time on it. On the other hand, I know of many overclockers that prefer to wait until after they've dialed everything in before they begin stress testing, so it's pretty subjective. 1 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook MageTank ✭ June 9 edited June 9 Part 4: Conclusion I am hoping that this guide made sense and that it wasn't too difficult to follow. I know that reading through it can be pretty daunting especially with the large glossary of timings, voltages and general terminology but honestly you do not need to know what anything does in order to adjust the settings to improve your performance. As long as you know what the "safe" values are and what not to exceed, you can pretty much wing it and still come out with a solid memory overclock. I plan to write supplementary guides explaining what each timing does and which ones are typically more impactful on performance so stay tuned for those. I also plan to write a guide specifically for AMD's Ryzen processors as the process is significantly different and warrants a different thread. Lastly, I am hoping to see what you guys can do. Nothing gets me more pumped for overclocking than someone to compete against and I think it would be fun to show off what we can do, especially if you've just recently picked this up. Would be a great way to track your improvement over time. Looking back at some of my old overclocks, it's definitely a significant difference now compared to then. Here is an example of my first time overclocking DDR4 back in 2015: Here is an example of me overclocking DDR4 now: If you asked my friends and myself a few years back, we would have thought that sub-40ns latency on DDR4 was impossible for 24/7 stability but it's most definitely possible. Here's to hoping we all keep improving. Just don't improve too much, I'd like to remain the best at something on this forum... 2 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook LandShark admin June 9 Wow, this has so much detail to it. I'll definitely be re-reading this to better understand the more complex details, but I think you've done a great job with it! Can't wait to try using this guide on my system! 1 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Ian admin June 10 https://community.microcenter.com/discussion/comment/33387#Comment_33387 Agree with this! Very helpful, thank you for posting this! 1 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook AlexS admin June 10 This is so freaking in-depth. I love it. 1 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Ichthus ✭ June 10 As a recent personal beneficiary of MageTank's memory overclocking expertise, I would encourage to basically treat this man's advice as Gospel and offer him sacrifices in the form of Dual-Rank Samsung B-Die memory kits. 1 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Don477 admin June 22 Great information! 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Categories 7K All Categories 1K The Blog 33 What's Trending 167 How to & Technical Guides 11 Computer Hardware 119 Software 3 Home Office 6 Networking Audio/Visual 2 Home Automation 16 3D Printers 10 Maker 16 PC Build Guides 96 Reviews & Buying Guides 34 Build Showcase 17 Contests 39 Past Contests 1K The Community 1.8K General Discussion 108 New Members 127 Consumer Tech 42 Prebuilt PCs and Laptops 78 Software 4 Audio/Visual 13 Networking & Security 1 Home Automation 2 Digital Photography 3 Content Creators 22 Hobby Boards & Projects 26 3D Printing 53 Retro Arcade/Gaming 86 All Other Tech 1.3K Store Information and Policy 51 Off Topic 5 Community Ideas & Feedback 113 Your Completed Builds 2.7K Build-Your-Own PC 1.7K Help Choosing Parts 225 Graphics Cards 172 CPUs, Memory, and Motherboards 62 Cases and Power Supplies 19 Air and Liquid Cooling 16 Monitors and Displays 30 Peripherals 10 All Other Parts 22 Featured Categories We love seeing what our customers build Submit photos and a description of your PC to our build showcase Submit Now Looking for a little inspiration? 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Services starting at $149.99 More Details Micro Center Homepage Desktops Laptops Computer Parts Computer Accessories Custom PC Builder Build Showcase Networking Electronics 3D Printing Service, Upgrades & Repairs Laptop Battery Replacement Laptop Screen Repair Virus and Malware Removal Hard Drive Recovery and Backup Apple MacBook Repair Custom Built PCs Schedule an Appointment © Vanilla Foundation Theme 2021 Powered By Vanilla Community Article Rocket Lake cpu availability — Micro Center Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker {$smarty.capture.menu} Activity Categories Discussions Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker Home › General Discussion Rocket Lake cpu availability cordovan66 ✭ June 12 in General Discussion I was about to buy the i5-11400 processor about 3 weeks ago but it went out of stock just then. It has not come back in stock since. Any idea when it might come back in stock? My local store is in Tustin, CA. The same thing happened with the motherboard I was about to buy: The Asus Prime H570. Any idea when it'll come back in stock? Thanks 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Comments Ian admin June 12 Greetings, I’m sorry but I do not have an ETA on when we will stock this item. We recommend bookmarking the product page and keep an eye on the product stock levels! https://community.microcenter.com/kb/articles/194-what-do-i-do-if-an-item-is-out-of-stock Once you see the item in stock, you can reserve an item by following the instructions on this knowledge base article! https://community.microcenter.com/kb/articles/30-how-to-reserve-an-item-online 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Categories 7K All Categories 1K The Blog 33 What's Trending 167 How to & Technical Guides 11 Computer Hardware 119 Software 3 Home Office 6 Networking Audio/Visual 2 Home Automation 16 3D Printers 10 Maker 16 PC Build Guides 96 Reviews & Buying Guides 34 Build Showcase 17 Contests 39 Past Contests 1K The Community 1.8K General Discussion 108 New Members 127 Consumer Tech 42 Prebuilt PCs and Laptops 78 Software 4 Audio/Visual 13 Networking & Security 1 Home Automation 2 Digital Photography 3 Content Creators 22 Hobby Boards & Projects 26 3D Printing 53 Retro Arcade/Gaming 86 All Other Tech 1.3K Store Information and Policy 51 Off Topic 5 Community Ideas & Feedback 113 Your Completed Builds 2.7K Build-Your-Own PC 1.7K Help Choosing Parts 225 Graphics Cards 172 CPUs, Memory, and Motherboards 62 Cases and Power Supplies 19 Air and Liquid Cooling 16 Monitors and Displays 30 Peripherals 10 All Other Parts 22 Featured Categories We love seeing what our customers build Submit photos and a description of your PC to our build showcase Submit Now Looking for a little inspiration? See other custom PC builds and get some ideas for what can be done View Build Showcase View builds by: AMD Processors Intel Processors RTX 3090 RTX 3080 RTX 2080 Ti RTX 2080 Super RTX 2070 Super RTX 2070 RTX 2060 Super Radeon RX 5700XT Radeon RX 5700 Air Cooled Liquid Cooled SAME DAY CUSTOM BUILD SERVICE If You Can Dream it, We Can Build it. Services starting at $149.99 More Details Micro Center Homepage Desktops Laptops Computer Parts Computer Accessories Custom PC Builder Build Showcase Networking Electronics 3D Printing Service, Upgrades & Repairs Laptop Battery Replacement Laptop Screen Repair Virus and Malware Removal Hard Drive Recovery and Backup Apple MacBook Repair Custom Built PCs Schedule an Appointment © Vanilla Foundation Theme 2021 Powered By Vanilla Community Article Intel Alder Lake Selfie Contest — Micro Center Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker {$smarty.capture.menu} Activity Categories Discussions Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker Home › Contests › Past Contests Intel Alder Lake Selfie Contest SeanM admin November 3 edited November 15 in Past Contests Heading to the store to pick up one of Intel's brand new 12th Gen Alder Lake processors? Take a selfie while you're there for a chance to win a $250 gift card. Running from 11/4-11/7, any time you stop by a Micro Center, come inside and take a quick selfie and post it to Facebook, Instagram, or Twitter with #Intel12GENxMC. Then, head over to our Gleam contest - right here - and link the photo. Please note: Gleam will only link posts that have both a photo and #Intel12GENxMC Winners will be notified 11/12 https://gleam.io/EBPO1/intel-12th-gen-selfie-sweepstakes Good luck! See attached contest terms and conditions. Contest submission window: 11/4/21 – 11/11/21 One 1st place winner will receive a $250 gift card Intel-Alder-Lake_Terms-Conditions.pdf 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Leave a Comment Rich Text Editor. To edit a paragraph's style, hit tab to get to the paragraph menu. From there you will be able to pick one style. Nothing defaults to paragraph. An inline formatting menu will show up when you select text. Hit tab to get into that menu. Some elements, such as rich link embeds, images, loading indicators, and error messages may get inserted into the editor. You may navigate to these using the arrow keys inside of the editor and delete them with the delete or backspace key. Comment As ... Categories 7K All Categories 1K The Blog 34 What's Trending 167 How to & Technical Guides 11 Computer Hardware 119 Software 3 Home Office 6 Networking Audio/Visual 2 Home Automation 16 3D Printers 10 Maker 16 PC Build Guides 96 Reviews & Buying Guides 34 Build Showcase 17 Contests 39 Past Contests 1K The Community 1.7K General Discussion 83 New Members 127 Consumer Tech 42 Prebuilt PCs and Laptops 78 Software 4 Audio/Visual 13 Networking & Security 1 Home Automation 2 Digital Photography 3 Content Creators 22 Hobby Boards & Projects 26 3D Printing 53 Retro Arcade/Gaming 86 All Other Tech 1.3K Store Information and Policy 51 Off Topic 6 Community Ideas & Feedback 113 Your Completed Builds 2.7K Build-Your-Own PC 1.7K Help Choosing Parts 227 Graphics Cards 172 CPUs, Memory, and Motherboards 62 Cases and Power Supplies 19 Air and Liquid Cooling 16 Monitors and Displays 30 Peripherals 10 All Other Parts 22 Featured Categories We love seeing what our customers build Submit photos and a description of your PC to our build showcase Submit Now Looking for a little inspiration? See other custom PC builds and get some ideas for what can be done View Build Showcase View builds by: AMD Processors Intel Processors RTX 3090 RTX 3080 RTX 2080 Ti RTX 2080 Super RTX 2070 Super RTX 2070 RTX 2060 Super Radeon RX 5700XT Radeon RX 5700 Air Cooled Liquid Cooled SAME DAY CUSTOM BUILD SERVICE If You Can Dream it, We Can Build it. Services starting at $149.99 More Details Micro Center Homepage Desktops Laptops Computer Parts Computer Accessories Custom PC Builder Build Showcase Networking Electronics 3D Printing Service, Upgrades & Repairs Laptop Battery Replacement Laptop Screen Repair Virus and Malware Removal Hard Drive Recovery and Backup Apple MacBook Repair Custom Built PCs Schedule an Appointment © Vanilla Foundation Theme 2021 Powered By Vanilla Community Article Intel 12th Gen Alder Lake Breakdown — Micro Center Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker {$smarty.capture.menu} Activity Categories Discussions Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker Home › Reviews & Buying Guides Intel 12th Gen Alder Lake Breakdown SeanM admin November 3 edited November 15 in Reviews & Buying Guides Intel’s brand-new lineup of processors are launching today! Intel's 12th Gen processors add hybrid processing to desktop PCs, and that’s just the beginning. All of the new Alder Lake processors come DDR5 RAM ready, with support for PCIe 5.0 and as many as 16 cores and 24 threads (with a boost of up to 5.2GHz!). And don’t forget the Core i9-12900k, the CPU Intel is calling “the world’s best gaming processor!” While that all sounds great, what does that actually mean for your next build? Hybrid Processing Brand new to 12th Gen is Intel’s hybrid performance hybrid architecture. Splitting the processor into Performance-cores (P-cores) and Efficient-cores (E-cores) helps ensure that your computer is maximizing your raw power. P-cores will be used for single and lightly-threaded programs, while E-cores will focus on the heavily-threaded work. Intel Thread Director Hybrid processing is managed by Intel’s new Thread Director. The Thread Director helps the OS prioritize processes and send them to either E- or P-cores. In simple terms, this means that you’ll be able to game as hard as your system allows while still browsing the web, streaming, or even doing some productivity work - up to 84% more frames while gaming, streaming, and recording. Don’t stop gaming to take care of business in the background ever again! DDR5 RAM The next generation of RAM, now available for use with consumer-grade processors for the first time with Intel's 12th Gen processors. DDR5 offers massive speeds, even reaching 4800MHz (most DDR4 RAM peaks around 3200MHz), with reduced power consumption compared to the previous generation of RAM. For more on DDR5 RAM and the boost it can give your system, be sure to check out our complete Benchmarks over here. PCIe 5.0 Alder lake also introduces PCIe 5.0 to home computers, doubling the GT/s speed from 4th gen PCIe to a whopping 32 GT/s. That’s going to make anything that connects via PCIe blazing fast – from SSDs to GPUs, this next generation of processing is going to feel snappier than ever. Intel UHD Graphics Intel’s integrated graphics are also getting an upgrade. Driven by Xe Architecture, integrated graphics will be able to support up to 8k HDR video and four simultaneous 4k displays. Alder Lake also introduces more efficient video rendering with enhanced GNA 3.0. Wi-Fi 6E Another next-gen upgrade is the additional support for Wi-Fi 6E. 6E not only opens up another Wi-Fi channel for your home, uncluttering your 2.4 and 5Ghz channels, but supports Gigabit Wi-Fi speeds. Stop running long ethernet cables through your house with Wi-Fi speeds faster than Cat5. Enhanced Gaming Capabilities While we did our own benchmarks, Intel's benchmarking shows that the Core i9-12900k is an incredible gaming card. With more than a 20% increase in frames in Troy: A Total War Saga, Hitman 3, and Far Cry 6, and, with the help of Wi-Fi 6E, a 75% reduction in latency while multitasking. Improved Content Creation Not gaming? Not to worry. Hybrid processing boosts speeds for productivity work as well. Expect up to 36% faster photo editing, 32% faster video editing, 37% faster 3D modeling, and 100% faster multi-frame rendering. And more! Looking for more on Intel's newest processor lineup? We've got a build guide, breakdown, and even a  Core i9-12900k giveaway! 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Leave a Comment Rich Text Editor. To edit a paragraph's style, hit tab to get to the paragraph menu. From there you will be able to pick one style. Nothing defaults to paragraph. An inline formatting menu will show up when you select text. Hit tab to get into that menu. Some elements, such as rich link embeds, images, loading indicators, and error messages may get inserted into the editor. You may navigate to these using the arrow keys inside of the editor and delete them with the delete or backspace key. Comment As ... Categories 7K All Categories 1K The Blog 34 What's Trending 167 How to & Technical Guides 11 Computer Hardware 119 Software 3 Home Office 6 Networking Audio/Visual 2 Home Automation 16 3D Printers 10 Maker 16 PC Build Guides 96 Reviews & Buying Guides 34 Build Showcase 17 Contests 39 Past Contests 1K The Community 1.7K General Discussion 83 New Members 127 Consumer Tech 42 Prebuilt PCs and Laptops 78 Software 4 Audio/Visual 13 Networking & Security 1 Home Automation 2 Digital Photography 3 Content Creators 22 Hobby Boards & Projects 26 3D Printing 53 Retro Arcade/Gaming 86 All Other Tech 1.3K Store Information and Policy 51 Off Topic 6 Community Ideas & Feedback 113 Your Completed Builds 2.7K Build-Your-Own PC 1.7K Help Choosing Parts 227 Graphics Cards 172 CPUs, Memory, and Motherboards 62 Cases and Power Supplies 19 Air and Liquid Cooling 16 Monitors and Displays 30 Peripherals 10 All Other Parts 22 Featured Categories We love seeing what our customers build Submit photos and a description of your PC to our build showcase Submit Now Looking for a little inspiration? See other custom PC builds and get some ideas for what can be done View Build Showcase View builds by: AMD Processors Intel Processors RTX 3090 RTX 3080 RTX 2080 Ti RTX 2080 Super RTX 2070 Super RTX 2070 RTX 2060 Super Radeon RX 5700XT Radeon RX 5700 Air Cooled Liquid Cooled SAME DAY CUSTOM BUILD SERVICE If You Can Dream it, We Can Build it. Services starting at $149.99 More Details Micro Center Homepage Desktops Laptops Computer Parts Computer Accessories Custom PC Builder Build Showcase Networking Electronics 3D Printing Service, Upgrades & Repairs Laptop Battery Replacement Laptop Screen Repair Virus and Malware Removal Hard Drive Recovery and Backup Apple MacBook Repair Custom Built PCs Schedule an Appointment © Vanilla Foundation Theme 2021 Powered By Vanilla Community Article CPU Buying Guide - AMD 5000 Series & Intel 10th Gen Comet Lake Series — Micro Center Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker {$smarty.capture.menu} Activity Categories Discussions Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker Home › Reviews & Buying Guides CPU Buying Guide - AMD 5000 Series & Intel 10th Gen Comet Lake Series cgum admin December 2020 edited December 2020 in Reviews & Buying Guides Choose From the Latest And Greatest CPUs to Fit Your Needs Whether you are a first time builder or have been assembling PCs since the dawn of time, the starting point is often the same—the CPU. And with it comes the question of which one you should buy. One of the reasons the CPU choice is so important is that it determines your build’s platform and overall direction. For example, if you are building around one of AMD's latest generation Ryzen 5000 series processors, you are likely looking to mate it with an X570 or B550 motherboard and perhaps a PCIe 4.0 SSD. Likewise, if you have chosen an Intel processor for your build, you will need to select a compatible motherboard with your desired features. So, which CPU should you buy? That is a loaded question, and there is no single answer. CPUs are not a one-size-fits-all component. Chipset, upgrade path, cores, architecture—they all play a role in what is best for your particular build. How Many CPU Cores Do I Need? A long time ago, clock speed was king, and like the speedometer on a car, the higher the clock speed, the faster the chip. These days it is not so cut and dry. Clockspeed still matters, but so do core and thread counts. Cores and threads are like arms and hands—imagine how much more efficient you could be with certain tasks if you had more than just two each. The same concept applies to CPUs. How many do you need? If your primary use is surfing the web and firing off emails, a dual-core chip will get the job done; it’s just not very fast. For an entry-level PC, I recommend going with four cores. Most modern four-core CPUs will serve just fine in a general-purpose PC and can even play games when matched with a discrete GPU. For a mid-range gaming PC or light content creation, you should be looking at six or eight cores, depending on your budget. Six to eight cores are also ideal for casual streaming. And for a high-end gaming PC, more intense video editing and encoding workloads, and professional streaming, go with as many cores as you can afford. Now let's go over some of the different options. AMD Ryzen 5000 Series If you are a gamer, the best CPUs for gaming right now also happen to be the newest ones from AMD. Based on its Zen 3 architecture, the Ryzen 5000 series combines strong single-threaded performance with up to 16 cores and 32 threads for multi-threaded workloads, making them suitable for nearly any task, gaming or otherwise. Here are the options: Ryzen 9 5950X (16 cores / 32 threads, 3.4GHz to 4.9GHz, 64MB L3 cache): $799.99 Ryzen 9 5900X (12 cores / 24 threads, 3.7GHz to 4.8GHz, 64MB L3 cache): $549.99 Ryzen 7 5800X (8 cores / 16 threads, 3.8GHz to 4.7GHz, 32MB L3 cache): $449.99 Ryzen 5 5600X (6 cores / 12 threads, 3.6GHz to 4.6GHz, 32MB L3 cache): $299.99 Ironically, the least expensive of the bunch—Ryzen 5 5600X—is also the only one to come with a bundled CPU air cooler, AMD's Wraith Stealth. If purchasing one of the other three, you will need an alternative cooling solution purchased separately, be it an all-in-one liquid cooler like Corsair's H115i XT or air cooler like Cooler Master's Hyper 212 RGB. Zen 3 is a significant upgrade over Zen 2, with AMD touting a 19 percent uptick in IPC (instructions per clock) performance. That essentially means that clock for clock and core for core, Zen 3 is 19 percent faster than Zen 2. Real-world performance can be more or less, depending on the workload. In gaming, however, Zen 3 shines. Source: AMD In AMD's testing, the Ryzen 9 5900X is up to 50 percent faster in games than the previous generation Ryzen 9 3900XT, both 12-core/24-thread CPUs. That is a best-case scenario, and a bit of an outlier, though overall, Zen 3 is a significant upgrade over the previous generation. All four of the Ryzen 5000 series processors are suitable for gaming, not just the Ryzen 9 5900X. The higher up you go, the better the performance, though the real benefit of going for more cores/threads is doing things like streaming and content creation.   If you're looking to build a higher-end PC, a good match for any of these chips is a motherboard based on AMD's X570 chipset. Or if you want to save a few bucks, the B550 chipset is nearly as good but more affordable. Some potential options: Asus X570-Pro Prime: $249.99 MSI X570 MPG Gaming Edge WiFi: $214.99 Gigabyte B550 Aorus Elite: $159.99 ASRock B550 Phantom Gaming 4: $114.99 Intel 10th Gen Comet Lake Series While the Ryzen 5000 series is the new kid on the block, Intel's 10th Gen Core Comet Lake processors are great for gaming and content creation. Intel has been optimizing its 14-nanometer manufacturing node for several years now, and so Comet Lake is more of an architectural refinement over Coffee Lake. However, Intel did change the socket for Comet Lake (LGA 1200), so if you are upgrading an existing build, you will need a new motherboard as well. That said, here are some of the higher-end Comet Lake options for gaming, streaming, and content creation: Core i9-10900K (10 cores / 20 threads, 3.7GHz to 5.3GHz, 20MB L3 cache): $529.99 Core i9-10850K (10 cores / 20 threads, 3.6GHz to 5.2GHz, 20MB L3 cache): $419.99 Core i9-10900 (10 cores / 20 threads, 2.8GHz to 5.2GHz, 20MB L3 cache): $399.99 Core i7-10700K (8 cores / 16 threads, 3.8GHz to 5.1GHz, 16MB L3 cache): $339.99 Core i7-10700 (8 cores / 16 threads, 2.9GHz to 4.8GHz, 16MB L3 cache): $319.99 Core i5-10600K (6 cores / 12 threads, 4.1GHz to 4.8GHz, 12MB L3 cache) $249.99 All of these are strong performers. And technically, while the Core i9-10900K is the best Intel CPU for consumers, the Core i9-10850K offers more bang for the buck, getting you near the same performance for around $100 less. Also, the same rule here applies with regards to streaming—the more cores, the better. If that is your goal, a Core i9-10900 or higher is the best option. You can stream with fewer cores, but I would suggest going no lower than six: the more cores, the less chance of occasional choppiness. Also, note that any Intel processor with a "K" designation like the Core i7-10700K has an unlocked multiplier. Unlocked multiplier comes in handy for overclocking if that is something you are interested in doing. If you are not looking to push the envelope, there are more affordable options that are great for 1080p gaming and general-purpose computing. Pair either of these with an entry-level or mid-range graphics card, and you'll have yourself a respectable gaming box. Core i5-10400 (6 cores / 12 threads, 2.9GHz to 4.3GHz, 12MB L3 cache): $149.99 Core i3-10100 (4 cores / 8 threads, 3.6GHz to 4.3GHz, 6MB L3 cache): $99.99 You could probably get away with some casual Twitch streaming with the Core i5-10400, but for the most part, these are for more budget-oriented builds. Here are some motherboard options at different price points: EVGA Z490 FTW WiFi: $329.99 Asus Z490-E ROG Strix Gaming: $299.99 MSI Z490 MAG Tomahawk: $189.99 Gigabyte B460-M DS3H Ultra Durable: $79.99 Finding Value in Older Generation CPUs Up to this point, I've mainly focused on the latest CPU architectures from AMD and Intel, with an emphasis on higher-end processors. But whether you're looking to build a modest gaming PC or a general-purpose workhouse on a more stringent budget, you have options. It was only a short while ago when previous generation CPUs like Zen 2 (Ryzen 3000 series) and Coffee Lake (9th Gen) were the top chips. And today? They are still capable hardware options. Both have their advantages. One reason to build around Zen 2 is the chipset. Both X570 and B550 support the latest technologies, and namely PCIe 4.0. This mostly matters if you plan to install a blazing fast PCIe 4.0 SSD, some of which can reach data transfer speeds of 7,000MB/s. To that end, one of the best bang-for-buck options is the Ryzen 5 3600 for $249.99. The 3600 is an excellent mid-range chip with six cores, 12 threads, a 3.6GHz base clock, 4.2GHz max boost clock, and 32MB of L3 cache. Some other notable options from within the Zen 2 family: Ryzen 7 3800XT (8 cores / 16 threads, 3.9GHz to 4.7GHz, 32MB L3 cache): $349.99 Ryzen 7 3800X (8 cores / 16 threads, 3.9GHz to 4.5GHz, 32MB L3 cache): $339.99 Ryzen 7 3700X (8 cores / 16 threads, 3.6GHz to 4.4GHz, 32MB L3 cache): $299.99 Ryzen 7 3600XT (6 cores / 12 threads, 3.8GHz to 4.5GHz, 32MB L3 cache): $269.99 Ryzen 5 3600X (6 cores / 12 threads, 3.8GHz to 4.4GHz, 32MB L3 cache): $259.99 On the other hand, Intel has not yet embraced PCIe 4.0 on the desktop (that will come when Rocket Lake arrives next year), but PCIe 3.0 SSDs are still plenty fast, so it's not a huge deal. Additionally, Intel's 9th Gen Core processors are very fast performing chips for gaming, media chores, encoding, and just about anything you throw at them. Some options worth considering: Core i9-9900K (8 cores / 16 threads, 3.6GHz to 5GHz, 16MB L3 cache): $299.99 Core i7-9700K (8 cores / 8 threads, 3.6GHz to 4.9GHz, 12MB L3 cache): $199.99 Core i5-9600K (6 cores / 6 threads, 3.7GHz to 4.6GHz, 9MB L3 cache): $149.99 Core i5-9400 (6 cores / 6 threads, 2.9GHz to 4.1GHz, 9MB L3 cache): $139.99 You can save a bit of money by going with an older generation CPU, whether it's an AMD or Intel chip. It's all about deciding what your budget is and then looking at your options. Check out our PC Builder tool when you're ready to start building your PC with one of these new CPUs. By: Paul Lilly 1 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Leave a Comment Rich Text Editor. To edit a paragraph's style, hit tab to get to the paragraph menu. From there you will be able to pick one style. Nothing defaults to paragraph. An inline formatting menu will show up when you select text. Hit tab to get into that menu. Some elements, such as rich link embeds, images, loading indicators, and error messages may get inserted into the editor. You may navigate to these using the arrow keys inside of the editor and delete them with the delete or backspace key. Comment As ... Categories 7K All Categories 1K The Blog 33 What's Trending 167 How to & Technical Guides 11 Computer Hardware 119 Software 3 Home Office 6 Networking Audio/Visual 2 Home Automation 16 3D Printers 10 Maker 16 PC Build Guides 96 Reviews & Buying Guides 34 Build Showcase 17 Contests 39 Past Contests 1K The Community 1.8K General Discussion 108 New Members 127 Consumer Tech 42 Prebuilt PCs and Laptops 78 Software 4 Audio/Visual 13 Networking & Security 1 Home Automation 2 Digital Photography 3 Content Creators 22 Hobby Boards & Projects 26 3D Printing 53 Retro Arcade/Gaming 86 All Other Tech 1.3K Store Information and Policy 51 Off Topic 5 Community Ideas & Feedback 113 Your Completed Builds 2.7K Build-Your-Own PC 1.7K Help Choosing Parts 225 Graphics Cards 172 CPUs, Memory, and Motherboards 62 Cases and Power Supplies 19 Air and Liquid Cooling 16 Monitors and Displays 30 Peripherals 10 All Other Parts 22 Featured Categories We love seeing what our customers build Submit photos and a description of your PC to our build showcase Submit Now Looking for a little inspiration? See other custom PC builds and get some ideas for what can be done View Build Showcase View builds by: AMD Processors Intel Processors RTX 3090 RTX 3080 RTX 2080 Ti RTX 2080 Super RTX 2070 Super RTX 2070 RTX 2060 Super Radeon RX 5700XT Radeon RX 5700 Air Cooled Liquid Cooled SAME DAY CUSTOM BUILD SERVICE If You Can Dream it, We Can Build it. Services starting at $149.99 More Details Micro Center Homepage Desktops Laptops Computer Parts Computer Accessories Custom PC Builder Build Showcase Networking Electronics 3D Printing Service, Upgrades & Repairs Laptop Battery Replacement Laptop Screen Repair Virus and Malware Removal Hard Drive Recovery and Backup Apple MacBook Repair Custom Built PCs Schedule an Appointment © Vanilla Foundation Theme 2021 Powered By Vanilla Community Article Intel Gen 11 Rocket Lake Build Guide — Micro Center Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker {$smarty.capture.menu} Activity Categories Discussions Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker Home › PC Build Guides Intel Gen 11 Rocket Lake Build Guide SeanM admin March 30 edited April 5 in PC Build Guides Intel’s brand new Rocket Lake 11th generation processors release today! And if you’re looking for some new build ideas, we’ve got you covered with builds for the new i5-11600k, i7-11700k, and even the high-powered i9-11900k! Simple but Mighty - the Intel i5-11600k The i5-11600k is perfect for newcomers to the PC building space, but still want a powerful rig, or for those who are just looking to build on a budget. We’ve put together a part list for a sleek and simple budget build, skipping the RGB to save on cost. Of course, these parts are all just suggestions, so feel free to swap some out if you do want that color splash! Processor: Intel i5-11600k The obvious starting point for our i5 build, the 11600k delivers six core power for a budget price. Starting at a base clock speed of 3.9 GHz, you can eke ever more power from it with overclocking or Intel’s Turbo Boost Technology 2.0, bringing it up to 4.9GHz. It’ll handle all your daily and gaming computing needs. Motherboard: ASRock - B560M PRO4 MicroATX The ASRock B560 PRO4 is a budget builder’s best friend. Coming in at under $100 but still offering PCIe 4.0 and supporting RAM speeds up to 3200MHz, it’ll do what you need it to do without breaking the bank Graphics Card: EVGA GeForce RTX 3060 Ti XC Every recent GeForce generation has been leaps and bounds greater than the previous, and the 30 series is no exception. The 3060 Ti is faster than the high-end 2080 Super of the last-gen, starting at half the cost. Perfect for a budget build. RAM: Crucial Ballistix Gaming 16GB (2 x GB) DDR4-3200 The secret of this RAM is that, despite looking fairly plain and being pretty inexpensive, it’ll still deliver incredible speed, pushing the B560M motherboard to its limit. Hard Drives: Samsung 870 EVO 500GB SSD and Seagate BarraCude 2TB HDD If you’ve read any of our previous buying guides, you know we won’t let you get away with just a standard HDD and this budget build is no exception. We’re using a 500GB Samsung SSD as main storage, with enough room for your OS and any other important files (RE: games) and backing it up with a 2TB HDD for everything else Power Supply: PowerSpec - 650 Watt 80+ Bronze Semi-Modular Just because you’re building on a budget doesn’t mean you should skimp on a power supply. Inexpensive power supplies are more likely to short out and potentially damage other components. The PowerSpec we chose is rated at 80+ Bronze, so you’ll avoid shorts and keep your computer powered and safe. And it’s semi-modular, so your case will stay clean without a bunch of loose extra cables floating about. Heat Sink: ThermalTake Slim X3 Since the i5-11600k doesn’t come with a pack-in heat sink, we’ll need to pick one up. As the i5 is not one of the top-of-the-line, high-power CPUs, we can get by with a smaller, more inexpensive heat sink. The Slim X3 is just that - enough cooling power that you don’t overheat, but not flashy enough to break the bank. Case: Lian Li 205M mATX Mid-Tower Case To compliment our MicroATX motherboard, we need a MicroATX case, and for that we turn to Lian Li. The 205M isn’t as flashy as some of their other cases, but it does offer their wonderful cable management tools and a tempered glass window so that any RGB you do budget in shows through, clear and bright. The full parts list can be found on our Custom PC Builder: https://www.microcenter.com/site/content/custom-pc-builder.aspx?load=d9a14ebb-f1dd-47ae-871d-0f6744a510e9  The Power Gamer - The Intel i7-11700k Looking for a little more oomph from your processor? Want to game hard, but keep costs under $2000? The Intel i7-11700k is for you.  The 11700k bumps its processing power up with eight cores and 12 threads, delivering even better speeds for gaming and daily use. So we’ll be building a gaming rig, complete with some RGB, to make the most of it. Processor: Intel i7-11700k The obvious choice for an i7-11700k build, it’s a step up from the i5 and delivers greater speed and power for every use. It’s a stellar processor, and the one we used for our benchmarking tests if you need proof! Motherboard: ASUS Tuf Gaming Z590 Plus Also used in our benchmarking, the ASUS Tuf Gaming Z590 is a standard ATX board, supporting PCI2 4.0, two M.2 slots for memory, and supports LAN speeds up to 2500Mbps Graphics Card: EVGA GeForce RTX 3070 FTW3 A step up in CPU power demands a step up in GPU power, so we’re going with the 3070 for some high-quality 4K gaming support. But, like the 3060 Ti above, picking up a 3070 won’t blow out your budget, making affordable 4K gaming a reality. Plus: RGB. RAM: G.Skill Trident Z RGB 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR4-3200 Let’s keep the RGB rolling right into our RAM with 16 gigs of DDR4-3200 RGB fueled RAM. And while the RGB won’t give you an edge in gaming, the 3200MHz RAM certainly will! Hard Drives: Samsung 970 EVO SSD 1TB M.2 NVMe and Seagate BarraCude 2TB HDD We’re taking our storage a step up with this build as well, opting for an M.2 NVMe SSD for even faster speeds. But, since 500gb won’t hold everything and we’re not going all out (yet), we’ll supplement it with a standard 2TB HDD for all your other files. Power Supply: NZXT C750 750 Watt 80 Plus Gold ATX Fully Modular Power Supply If we’re building a nice rig, we want it looking nice, right? One of the easiest ways to do that is with a fully modular power supply. With fully modular PSUs, every cable you hook up will be used, and any cable you don’t need can stay in the box. Absolutely no extraneous cables in your case! Heat Sink: Cooler Master Hyper 212 Black The more powerful your processor, the more heat it’s going to generate. With an i7, the heat won’t be astronomical, but it does warrant a slightly higher-quality cooler, and the Hyper 212 Black is just that. It’s big, it’s powerful, and it won’t put you over budget. Case: Lian Li Lancool 205 Mesh Tempered Glass ATX Mid-Tower Black It’s RGB time. Lian Li makes stellar cases with incredible cable management, as previously noted. What makes the 205 special is the RGB fans all around the case combined with a minimal aesthetic, making a vibrant case that doesn’t feel gaudy. The full parts list can be found on our Custom PC Builder: https://www.microcenter.com/site/content/custom-pc-builder.aspx?load=491c6eea-787f-445e-aa49-936034e73ba2  The Do-It-All - The Intel i9-11900K So, you’re a gamer, video editor, and photoshop whiz. You need a processor that can handle it all and then some. Or maybe you’re just one of those things and will settle for nothing less than the best Intel has to offer. The i9-11900k is that processor. And we’ll be using it as the basis for a no-holds-barred (but still reasonable) rig. Processor: Intel i9-11900k The apex of Rocket Lake processors, the 11900k can do everything the i3, i5, and i7 can do, but better and faster. It’s the processor for the hardcore and die-hard enthusiasts, for those who push every computer part to its absolute limit gaming and editing. Basically: it’s powerful. Motherboard: ASUS Z590-E ROG STRIX Gaming WiFi Without going too overboard, the Z590-E, is sleek, powerful, and WiFi ready. Plus, it has four M.2 slots, RGB customization, and multiple PCIe 4.0 slots. It’s the whole package, at a lower price.  Graphics Card: EVGA GeForce RTX 3090 FTW3 Ultra Gaming A top-of-the-line processor deserves a top-of-the-line GPU, and you can’t go higher than the GeForce RTX 3090. Able to handle 4k gaming with ease, the 3090 is getting you ready for 8k gaming.  RAM: G.Skill Trident Z RGB 32GB (2 x 16GB) DDR4-3200 What do you add to the 3200MHZ RAM we used in the i7 build? More RAM and RGB, obviously! We’re doubling it to 32 GB of DDR4-3200 RAM while sticking with only two sticks. So if you need even more RAM, you have the option. Hard Drives: Samsung 970 EVO SSD 1TB M.2 NVMe and Samsung 870 EVO 1TB SSD Absolutely no HDDs in this build. We’re using a big M.2 NVMe as our main drive, with a standard SSD as the backup for everything else. It’s all about speed and stability, something old-school HDDs won’t deliver! Power Supply: ASUS ROG Thor 850 Watt 80 Plus Platinum ATX Fully Modular For our powerhouse build, we need a PSU that’ll deliver the power we need and won’t fail on us. That’s why we’re springing for an 850 watt PSU with an 80 Plus Platinum rating. It’s as solid as they come, and the RGB is a nice bonus! Water Cooler: NZXT Kraken Z63 280mm RGB CPU Water Cooling Kit Ultimate power deserves ultimate cooling, so we’ll water cool this processor. The Kraken Z63 delivers top-of-the-line water cooling, RGB lighting, and a customizable LCD screen. Put your temps on it, put your favorite gif on it, put your favorite Micro Center logo on it! Case: NZXT H510 Elite Dual-Tempered Glass RGB ATX Mid-Tower Case Let’s cap the whole build off by complimenting our water cooler with an NZXT H510 Elite case. Featuring dual tempered glass windows, you can show off not only your components but how well you did your cable management! Plus two gorgeous front-facing RGB fans make the H510 Elite the perfect case for your new powerhouse The full parts list can be found on our Custom PC Builder: https://www.microcenter.com/site/content/custom-pc-builder.aspx?load=bde9c6e0-2dfa-464d-9976-08274a974b29  And if you're looking for even more news, discussions, and reviews on Intel's Gen 11 Processors, be sure to check out our Rocket Lake Benchmarks and Discussion/FAQ posts! 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Leave a Comment Rich Text Editor. To edit a paragraph's style, hit tab to get to the paragraph menu. From there you will be able to pick one style. Nothing defaults to paragraph. An inline formatting menu will show up when you select text. Hit tab to get into that menu. Some elements, such as rich link embeds, images, loading indicators, and error messages may get inserted into the editor. You may navigate to these using the arrow keys inside of the editor and delete them with the delete or backspace key. Comment As ... Categories 7K All Categories 1K The Blog 34 What's Trending 167 How to & Technical Guides 11 Computer Hardware 119 Software 3 Home Office 6 Networking Audio/Visual 2 Home Automation 16 3D Printers 10 Maker 16 PC Build Guides 96 Reviews & Buying Guides 34 Build Showcase 17 Contests 39 Past Contests 1K The Community 1.7K General Discussion 83 New Members 127 Consumer Tech 42 Prebuilt PCs and Laptops 78 Software 4 Audio/Visual 13 Networking & Security 1 Home Automation 2 Digital Photography 3 Content Creators 22 Hobby Boards & Projects 26 3D Printing 53 Retro Arcade/Gaming 86 All Other Tech 1.3K Store Information and Policy 51 Off Topic 6 Community Ideas & Feedback 113 Your Completed Builds 2.7K Build-Your-Own PC 1.7K Help Choosing Parts 227 Graphics Cards 172 CPUs, Memory, and Motherboards 62 Cases and Power Supplies 19 Air and Liquid Cooling 16 Monitors and Displays 30 Peripherals 10 All Other Parts 22 Featured Categories We love seeing what our customers build Submit photos and a description of your PC to our build showcase Submit Now Looking for a little inspiration? See other custom PC builds and get some ideas for what can be done View Build Showcase View builds by: AMD Processors Intel Processors RTX 3090 RTX 3080 RTX 2080 Ti RTX 2080 Super RTX 2070 Super RTX 2070 RTX 2060 Super Radeon RX 5700XT Radeon RX 5700 Air Cooled Liquid Cooled SAME DAY CUSTOM BUILD SERVICE If You Can Dream it, We Can Build it. Services starting at $149.99 More Details Micro Center Homepage Desktops Laptops Computer Parts Computer Accessories Custom PC Builder Build Showcase Networking Electronics 3D Printing Service, Upgrades & Repairs Laptop Battery Replacement Laptop Screen Repair Virus and Malware Removal Hard Drive Recovery and Backup Apple MacBook Repair Custom Built PCs Schedule an Appointment © Vanilla Foundation Theme 2021 Powered By Vanilla Community Article Intel Rocket Lake is coming soon - What are you building? — Micro Center Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker {$smarty.capture.menu} Activity Categories Discussions Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker Home › General Discussion Intel Rocket Lake is coming soon - What are you building? SeanM admin March 26 edited June 16 in General Discussion Intel's 11th gen Rocket Lake processors are coming soon - Are you picking up parts this weekend in preparation for a new build or upgrade? We wanna know about it! And if you're looking to compile a parts list, be sure to check out our Custom PC Builder tool for instant compatibility checking and as-you-add pricing! 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Comments Ian admin March 27 Nothing for me personally but I hope some others are excited to build with these processors! 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook madscientist42 ✭ April 17 Nada. I've got a Ryzen 9 system now. Next upgrade if it's not doing my Laptop is a Threadripper. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook saphalline ✭ April 23 I am also a Ryzen fan lately, but kudos to Intel for realigning their pricing on 10th-gen and 11th-gen parts. The i5 11400 is a really good deal now at under $200. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Categories 7K All Categories 1K The Blog 33 What's Trending 167 How to & Technical Guides 11 Computer Hardware 119 Software 3 Home Office 6 Networking Audio/Visual 2 Home Automation 16 3D Printers 10 Maker 16 PC Build Guides 96 Reviews & Buying Guides 34 Build Showcase 17 Contests 39 Past Contests 1K The Community 1.8K General Discussion 108 New Members 127 Consumer Tech 42 Prebuilt PCs and Laptops 78 Software 4 Audio/Visual 13 Networking & Security 1 Home Automation 2 Digital Photography 3 Content Creators 22 Hobby Boards & Projects 26 3D Printing 53 Retro Arcade/Gaming 86 All Other Tech 1.3K Store Information and Policy 51 Off Topic 5 Community Ideas & Feedback 113 Your Completed Builds 2.7K Build-Your-Own PC 1.7K Help Choosing Parts 225 Graphics Cards 172 CPUs, Memory, and Motherboards 62 Cases and Power Supplies 19 Air and Liquid Cooling 16 Monitors and Displays 30 Peripherals 10 All Other Parts 22 Featured Categories We love seeing what our customers build Submit photos and a description of your PC to our build showcase Submit Now Looking for a little inspiration? See other custom PC builds and get some ideas for what can be done View Build Showcase View builds by: AMD Processors Intel Processors RTX 3090 RTX 3080 RTX 2080 Ti RTX 2080 Super RTX 2070 Super RTX 2070 RTX 2060 Super Radeon RX 5700XT Radeon RX 5700 Air Cooled Liquid Cooled SAME DAY CUSTOM BUILD SERVICE If You Can Dream it, We Can Build it. Services starting at $149.99 More Details Micro Center Homepage Desktops Laptops Computer Parts Computer Accessories Custom PC Builder Build Showcase Networking Electronics 3D Printing Service, Upgrades & Repairs Laptop Battery Replacement Laptop Screen Repair Virus and Malware Removal Hard Drive Recovery and Backup Apple MacBook Repair Custom Built PCs Schedule an Appointment © Vanilla Foundation Theme 2021 Powered By Vanilla Community Article CES 2021 Recap: Intel News and Announcements — Micro Center Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker {$smarty.capture.menu} Activity Categories Discussions Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker Home › Reviews & Buying Guides CES 2021 Recap: Intel News and Announcements SeanM admin January 12 edited June 3 in Reviews & Buying Guides CES 2021 brought us some more news on Intel’s upcoming 11th gen processors. You can watch the whole conference here, or skip past the break for the high-level breakdown of what you should know. The Overview Intel is introducing four new families of processors: Business: 11th Gen Intel vPro Education: Intel Pentium Silver and Intel Celeron, both designed on 10 nm architecture High-End Desktops: Rocket Lake processors, coming Q1 2021 Mobile Gaming: Tiger Lake H Series, coming 2021 12th Gen processors announced, named Alder Lake, coming second half of 2021 The Breakdown Intel Rocket Lake With an announced release date of Q1 2021, the Rocket Lake processors will be available sooner rather than later. Beyond that, not too much was mentioned within the presentation itself. The i9-11900k was announced, with a reported 7% improvement over the i9-10900k, and the series is supposed to bring "IPC gains upwards of 19%," along with 20 PCIe Gen 4.0 lanes. Intel Tiger Lake H Intel's presentation on Tiger Lake H, a new processor for laptop-based gaming, was the biggest draw for consumers.  The new series of mobile processors allow for speeds up to 5GHz and enable "competitive level performance and responsiveness." In other words, you'll be able to play games at 70+ frames at 1080p, with support for 4k gaming.  Additionally, the Tiger Lake H cards support 20 lanes of PCIe Gen 4.0 architecture and Intel Killer Wi-Fi 6E support. Intel Alder Lake Not much was revealed about Alder Lake processors, other than the 12th gen of Intel processors arriving in the second half of 2021 and will be built on 10nm SuperFin to deliver "smarter, faster, and more efficient real-world processing." 11th Gen Intel vPro Designed for business use, the 11th Gen Intel vPro processors bump up security and performance over the last generation. The Intel Control-Flow Enforcement Technology (or CET) helps fight off control-flow attacks on PC by detecting threats and terminating connections before they can take hold. They also boast faster productivity while video conferencing, working in Office 365, and faster video render times. Intel Pentium Silver and Celeron The new wave of Pentium and Celeron processors from Intel boosts performance up to 35% from the previous generation thanks to 10nm architecture, allowing for better utilization of learning tools while cutting down on distracting load times. That wraps up what Intel revealed with their 2021 CES presentation! What do you think? Excited about the improvements coming to gaming laptops with the Tiger Lake H processor? Curious about the power behind Alder Lake? Let us know in the comments! Image Credits: Intel 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Leave a Comment Rich Text Editor. To edit a paragraph's style, hit tab to get to the paragraph menu. From there you will be able to pick one style. Nothing defaults to paragraph. An inline formatting menu will show up when you select text. Hit tab to get into that menu. Some elements, such as rich link embeds, images, loading indicators, and error messages may get inserted into the editor. You may navigate to these using the arrow keys inside of the editor and delete them with the delete or backspace key. Comment As ... Categories 7K All Categories 1K The Blog 34 What's Trending 167 How to & Technical Guides 11 Computer Hardware 119 Software 3 Home Office 6 Networking Audio/Visual 2 Home Automation 16 3D Printers 10 Maker 16 PC Build Guides 96 Reviews & Buying Guides 34 Build Showcase 17 Contests 39 Past Contests 1K The Community 1.7K General Discussion 83 New Members 127 Consumer Tech 42 Prebuilt PCs and Laptops 78 Software 4 Audio/Visual 13 Networking & Security 1 Home Automation 2 Digital Photography 3 Content Creators 22 Hobby Boards & Projects 26 3D Printing 53 Retro Arcade/Gaming 86 All Other Tech 1.3K Store Information and Policy 51 Off Topic 6 Community Ideas & Feedback 113 Your Completed Builds 2.7K Build-Your-Own PC 1.7K Help Choosing Parts 227 Graphics Cards 172 CPUs, Memory, and Motherboards 62 Cases and Power Supplies 19 Air and Liquid Cooling 16 Monitors and Displays 30 Peripherals 10 All Other Parts 22 Featured Categories We love seeing what our customers build Submit photos and a description of your PC to our build showcase Submit Now Looking for a little inspiration? See other custom PC builds and get some ideas for what can be done View Build Showcase View builds by: AMD Processors Intel Processors RTX 3090 RTX 3080 RTX 2080 Ti RTX 2080 Super RTX 2070 Super RTX 2070 RTX 2060 Super Radeon RX 5700XT Radeon RX 5700 Air Cooled Liquid Cooled SAME DAY CUSTOM BUILD SERVICE If You Can Dream it, We Can Build it. Services starting at $149.99 More Details Micro Center Homepage Desktops Laptops Computer Parts Computer Accessories Custom PC Builder Build Showcase Networking Electronics 3D Printing Service, Upgrades & Repairs Laptop Battery Replacement Laptop Screen Repair Virus and Malware Removal Hard Drive Recovery and Backup Apple MacBook Repair Custom Built PCs Schedule an Appointment © Vanilla Foundation Theme 2021 Powered By Vanilla Community Article Intel Core i7-9700K Coffee Lake 3.6GHz Eight-Core LGA 1151 Boxed Processor — Micro Center Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker {$smarty.capture.menu} Activity Categories Discussions Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker Home › Off Topic Intel Core i7-9700K Coffee Lake 3.6GHz Eight-Core LGA 1151 Boxed Processor MattE ✭ February 17 in Off Topic Hello, In need of buying a 'Intel Core i7-9700K Coffee Lake 3.6GHz Eight-Core LGA 1151 Boxed Processor' from Micro Center but it's "In-Store Only". The nearest store from me is in Cambridge, Mass which would be a round trip of 4 hours at the least given the traffic to get there from Southern, Maine. That's my dilemma. Who among all the honest people here could buy it for me and I could send the money to them via PayPal? Is this doable? Matt 1 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Categories 7K All Categories 1K The Blog 34 What's Trending 167 How to & Technical Guides 11 Computer Hardware 119 Software 3 Home Office 6 Networking Audio/Visual 2 Home Automation 16 3D Printers 10 Maker 16 PC Build Guides 96 Reviews & Buying Guides 34 Build Showcase 17 Contests 39 Past Contests 1K The Community 1.7K General Discussion 83 New Members 127 Consumer Tech 42 Prebuilt PCs and Laptops 78 Software 4 Audio/Visual 13 Networking & Security 1 Home Automation 2 Digital Photography 3 Content Creators 22 Hobby Boards & Projects 26 3D Printing 53 Retro Arcade/Gaming 86 All Other Tech 1.3K Store Information and Policy 52 Off Topic 6 Community Ideas & Feedback 113 Your Completed Builds 2.7K Build-Your-Own PC 1.7K Help Choosing Parts 227 Graphics Cards 172 CPUs, Memory, and Motherboards 62 Cases and Power Supplies 19 Air and Liquid Cooling 16 Monitors and Displays 30 Peripherals 10 All Other Parts 22 Featured Categories We love seeing what our customers build Submit photos and a description of your PC to our build showcase Submit Now Looking for a little inspiration? See other custom PC builds and get some ideas for what can be done View Build Showcase View builds by: AMD Processors Intel Processors RTX 3090 RTX 3080 RTX 2080 Ti RTX 2080 Super RTX 2070 Super RTX 2070 RTX 2060 Super Radeon RX 5700XT Radeon RX 5700 Air Cooled Liquid Cooled SAME DAY CUSTOM BUILD SERVICE If You Can Dream it, We Can Build it. Services starting at $149.99 More Details Micro Center Homepage Desktops Laptops Computer Parts Computer Accessories Custom PC Builder Build Showcase Networking Electronics 3D Printing Service, Upgrades & Repairs Laptop Battery Replacement Laptop Screen Repair Virus and Malware Removal Hard Drive Recovery and Backup Apple MacBook Repair Custom Built PCs Schedule an Appointment © Vanilla Foundation Theme 2021 Powered By Vanilla Community Article Intel Core i9-10850K Comet Lake 3.6GHz Ten-Core LGA 1200 Boxed Processor — Micro Center Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker {$smarty.capture.menu} Activity Categories Discussions Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker Home › General Discussion Intel Core i9-10850K Comet Lake 3.6GHz Ten-Core LGA 1200 Boxed Processor FudgeBerry ✭ March 20 edited June 7 in General Discussion When will the 330$ off sale end? 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Comments Ian admin March 20 https://community.microcenter.com/discussion/8036/intel-core-i9-10850k-comet-lake-3-6ghz-ten-core-lga-1200-boxed-processor Hello! It will run through 3/22. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Categories 7K All Categories 1K The Blog 33 What's Trending 167 How to & Technical Guides 11 Computer Hardware 119 Software 3 Home Office 6 Networking Audio/Visual 2 Home Automation 16 3D Printers 10 Maker 16 PC Build Guides 96 Reviews & Buying Guides 34 Build Showcase 17 Contests 39 Past Contests 1K The Community 1.8K General Discussion 108 New Members 127 Consumer Tech 42 Prebuilt PCs and Laptops 78 Software 4 Audio/Visual 13 Networking & Security 1 Home Automation 2 Digital Photography 3 Content Creators 22 Hobby Boards & Projects 26 3D Printing 53 Retro Arcade/Gaming 86 All Other Tech 1.3K Store Information and Policy 51 Off Topic 5 Community Ideas & Feedback 113 Your Completed Builds 2.7K Build-Your-Own PC 1.7K Help Choosing Parts 225 Graphics Cards 172 CPUs, Memory, and Motherboards 62 Cases and Power Supplies 19 Air and Liquid Cooling 16 Monitors and Displays 30 Peripherals 10 All Other Parts 22 Featured Categories We love seeing what our customers build Submit photos and a description of your PC to our build showcase Submit Now Looking for a little inspiration? See other custom PC builds and get some ideas for what can be done View Build Showcase View builds by: AMD Processors Intel Processors RTX 3090 RTX 3080 RTX 2080 Ti RTX 2080 Super RTX 2070 Super RTX 2070 RTX 2060 Super Radeon RX 5700XT Radeon RX 5700 Air Cooled Liquid Cooled SAME DAY CUSTOM BUILD SERVICE If You Can Dream it, We Can Build it. Services starting at $149.99 More Details Micro Center Homepage Desktops Laptops Computer Parts Computer Accessories Custom PC Builder Build Showcase Networking Electronics 3D Printing Service, Upgrades & Repairs Laptop Battery Replacement Laptop Screen Repair Virus and Malware Removal Hard Drive Recovery and Backup Apple MacBook Repair Custom Built PCs Schedule an Appointment © Vanilla Foundation Theme 2021 Powered By Vanilla Community Article Intel Core i9-9900K Coffee Lake 3.6GHz Eight-Core LGA 1151 Boxed Processor — Micro Center Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker {$smarty.capture.menu} Activity Categories Discussions Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker Home › Help Choosing Parts Intel Core i9-9900K Coffee Lake 3.6GHz Eight-Core LGA 1151 Boxed Processor joesedroid ✭ April 2020 in Help Choosing Parts Hello, can anyone tell me if this comes with a fan? I am not going to over clock this and dont need major cooling. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Comments Ian admin April 2020 edited April 2020 Greetings Joesedroid. Unfortunately no, the 9900K does not come with a fan/heat sink. A separate purchase would need to be made of either an air cooler or a water cooling system. With a processor like that looking into liquid cooling would be recommended but you can use a standard air cooler with it.  0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Categories 7K All Categories 1K The Blog 34 What's Trending 167 How to & Technical Guides 11 Computer Hardware 119 Software 3 Home Office 6 Networking Audio/Visual 2 Home Automation 16 3D Printers 10 Maker 16 PC Build Guides 96 Reviews & Buying Guides 34 Build Showcase 17 Contests 39 Past Contests 1K The Community 1.7K General Discussion 83 New Members 127 Consumer Tech 42 Prebuilt PCs and Laptops 78 Software 4 Audio/Visual 13 Networking & Security 1 Home Automation 2 Digital Photography 3 Content Creators 22 Hobby Boards & Projects 26 3D Printing 53 Retro Arcade/Gaming 86 All Other Tech 1.3K Store Information and Policy 51 Off Topic 6 Community Ideas & Feedback 113 Your Completed Builds 2.7K Build-Your-Own PC 1.7K Help Choosing Parts 227 Graphics Cards 172 CPUs, Memory, and Motherboards 62 Cases and Power Supplies 19 Air and Liquid Cooling 16 Monitors and Displays 30 Peripherals 10 All Other Parts 22 Featured Categories We love seeing what our customers build Submit photos and a description of your PC to our build showcase Submit Now Looking for a little inspiration? See other custom PC builds and get some ideas for what can be done View Build Showcase View builds by: AMD Processors Intel Processors RTX 3090 RTX 3080 RTX 2080 Ti RTX 2080 Super RTX 2070 Super RTX 2070 RTX 2060 Super Radeon RX 5700XT Radeon RX 5700 Air Cooled Liquid Cooled SAME DAY CUSTOM BUILD SERVICE If You Can Dream it, We Can Build it. Services starting at $149.99 More Details Micro Center Homepage Desktops Laptops Computer Parts Computer Accessories Custom PC Builder Build Showcase Networking Electronics 3D Printing Service, Upgrades & Repairs Laptop Battery Replacement Laptop Screen Repair Virus and Malware Removal Hard Drive Recovery and Backup Apple MacBook Repair Custom Built PCs Schedule an Appointment © Vanilla Foundation Theme 2021 Powered By Vanilla Community Article Compatibility — Micro Center Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker {$smarty.capture.menu} Activity Categories Discussions Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker Home › General Discussion Compatibility AjayShamma Texas ✭ December 2020 in General Discussion Will the Gigabyte Z390 M Gaming  motherboard work with a  Intel Core i9-9900K Coffee Lake 3.6GHz Eight-Core LGA 1151 Boxed Processor? 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Comments LandShark admin December 2020 Hello @AjayShamma welcome to the community! Yes, the motherboard you mentioned supports 9th and 8th Gen Intel® Core™ Processors So it would be compatible with the i9-9900K! Please let us know if you have any other questions or concerns! 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook AjayShamma Texas ✭ December 2020 ok thank you 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Categories 7K All Categories 1K The Blog 34 What's Trending 167 How to & Technical Guides 11 Computer Hardware 119 Software 3 Home Office 6 Networking Audio/Visual 2 Home Automation 16 3D Printers 10 Maker 16 PC Build Guides 96 Reviews & Buying Guides 34 Build Showcase 17 Contests 39 Past Contests 1K The Community 1.7K General Discussion 83 New Members 127 Consumer Tech 42 Prebuilt PCs and Laptops 78 Software 4 Audio/Visual 13 Networking & Security 1 Home Automation 2 Digital Photography 3 Content Creators 22 Hobby Boards & Projects 26 3D Printing 53 Retro Arcade/Gaming 86 All Other Tech 1.3K Store Information and Policy 51 Off Topic 6 Community Ideas & Feedback 113 Your Completed Builds 2.7K Build-Your-Own PC 1.7K Help Choosing Parts 227 Graphics Cards 172 CPUs, Memory, and Motherboards 62 Cases and Power Supplies 19 Air and Liquid Cooling 16 Monitors and Displays 30 Peripherals 10 All Other Parts 22 Featured Categories We love seeing what our customers build Submit photos and a description of your PC to our build showcase Submit Now Looking for a little inspiration? See other custom PC builds and get some ideas for what can be done View Build Showcase View builds by: AMD Processors Intel Processors RTX 3090 RTX 3080 RTX 2080 Ti RTX 2080 Super RTX 2070 Super RTX 2070 RTX 2060 Super Radeon RX 5700XT Radeon RX 5700 Air Cooled Liquid Cooled SAME DAY CUSTOM BUILD SERVICE If You Can Dream it, We Can Build it. Services starting at $149.99 More Details Micro Center Homepage Desktops Laptops Computer Parts Computer Accessories Custom PC Builder Build Showcase Networking Electronics 3D Printing Service, Upgrades & Repairs Laptop Battery Replacement Laptop Screen Repair Virus and Malware Removal Hard Drive Recovery and Backup Apple MacBook Repair Custom Built PCs Schedule an Appointment © Vanilla Foundation Theme 2021 Powered By Vanilla Community Article When will the 11th Gen Intel Desktop CPUs be available? — Micro Center Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker {$smarty.capture.menu} Activity Categories Discussions Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker Home › General Discussion When will the 11th Gen Intel Desktop CPUs be available? TJay ✭ March 16 edited June 7 in General Discussion I have read it's either March 18th or March 30th from 2 different articles. Just wondering when they will be available in the store.. Thanks, TJ 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Comments Ian admin March 16 Hello, they are expected to be available on March 30th. 1 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook TJay ✭ March 16 Awesome thanks! 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Ian admin March 16 https://community.microcenter.com/discussion/comment/29572#Comment_29572 You're welcome, have a great day! 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Rwadeg ✭ March 23 edited March 23 How much will they be selling for? i5-11600K? i7-11700K? 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook LandShark admin March 23 Hello @Rwadeg Our website would be the best place to find pricing information as it is subject to change. We currently have them available for pre-order. Please see these links below! https://www.microcenter.com/product/633423/intel-core-i5-11600k-rocket-lake-39ghz-six-core-lga-1200-boxed-processor https://www.microcenter.com/product/633422/intel-core-i7-11700k-rocket-lake-36ghz-eight-core-lga-1200-boxed-processor I hope this helps, but please let me know if you have any other questions! 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Categories 7K All Categories 1K The Blog 33 What's Trending 167 How to & Technical Guides 11 Computer Hardware 119 Software 3 Home Office 6 Networking Audio/Visual 2 Home Automation 16 3D Printers 10 Maker 16 PC Build Guides 96 Reviews & Buying Guides 34 Build Showcase 17 Contests 39 Past Contests 1K The Community 1.8K General Discussion 108 New Members 127 Consumer Tech 42 Prebuilt PCs and Laptops 78 Software 4 Audio/Visual 13 Networking & Security 1 Home Automation 2 Digital Photography 3 Content Creators 22 Hobby Boards & Projects 26 3D Printing 53 Retro Arcade/Gaming 86 All Other Tech 1.3K Store Information and Policy 51 Off Topic 5 Community Ideas & Feedback 113 Your Completed Builds 2.7K Build-Your-Own PC 1.7K Help Choosing Parts 225 Graphics Cards 172 CPUs, Memory, and Motherboards 62 Cases and Power Supplies 19 Air and Liquid Cooling 16 Monitors and Displays 30 Peripherals 10 All Other Parts 22 Featured Categories We love seeing what our customers build Submit photos and a description of your PC to our build showcase Submit Now Looking for a little inspiration? See other custom PC builds and get some ideas for what can be done View Build Showcase View builds by: AMD Processors Intel Processors RTX 3090 RTX 3080 RTX 2080 Ti RTX 2080 Super RTX 2070 Super RTX 2070 RTX 2060 Super Radeon RX 5700XT Radeon RX 5700 Air Cooled Liquid Cooled SAME DAY CUSTOM BUILD SERVICE If You Can Dream it, We Can Build it. Services starting at $149.99 More Details Micro Center Homepage Desktops Laptops Computer Parts Computer Accessories Custom PC Builder Build Showcase Networking Electronics 3D Printing Service, Upgrades & Repairs Laptop Battery Replacement Laptop Screen Repair Virus and Malware Removal Hard Drive Recovery and Backup Apple MacBook Repair Custom Built PCs Schedule an Appointment © Vanilla Foundation Theme 2021 Powered By Vanilla Community Article Looking for Motherboard to Support Intel i9-9900K processor — Micro Center Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker {$smarty.capture.menu} Activity Categories Discussions Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker Home › CPUs, Memory, and Motherboards Looking for Motherboard to Support Intel i9-9900K processor Scotto1917 ✭ December 2020 in CPUs, Memory, and Motherboards Hi....  I am about to purchase an Intel Core i9-9900K Coffee Lake 3.6GHz 8 Core LGA1151 processor and I am looking for recommendations on a system/motherboard to support it.  The website is recommending either an ASUS Z390-A Prime Intel LGA 1151 ATX Motherboard or an MSI Z390 MPG Gaming Edge AC Intel LGA 1151 ATX Motherboard.  Not sure of the difference or if one is better than the other.  Also wanting something that supports an AMD Radeon or Nvidia GeForce GPU.   Recommendations on motherboard? Thanks very much.... Scotto1917 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Comments Ian admin December 2020 Scotto1917 said: Hi....  I am about to purchase an Intel Core i9-9900K Coffee Lake 3.6GHz 8 Core LGA1151 processor and I am looking for recommendations on a system/motherboard to support it.  The website is recommending either an ASUS Z390-A Prime Intel LGA 1151 ATX Motherboard or an MSI Z390 MPG Gaming Edge AC Intel LGA 1151 ATX Motherboard.  Not sure of the difference or if one is better than the other.  Also wanting something that supports an AMD Radeon or Nvidia GeForce GPU.   Recommendations on motherboard? Thanks very much.... Scotto1917 Hello! They are pretty similar motherboards. You can view a comparison of their specs on our website at: https://www.microcenter.com/endeca/CompareV2.aspx?returnUrl=L3NlYXJjaC9zZWFyY2hfcmVzdWx0cy5hc3B4P049MCZOVFQ9TVNJK1ozOTArTVBHK0dhbWluZytFZGdlKyZOVFQ9TVNJK1ozOTArTVBHK0dhbWluZytFZGdlKyZOVEs9YWxsJnBhZ2U9MQ== It looks like the MSI board does have Wi-Fi/Bluetooth over the ASUS board not having that included, so if either of those features interest you I'd recommend the MSI one over the ASUS board. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Scotto1917 ✭ December 2020 Thank you! 1 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Categories 7K All Categories 1K The Blog 33 What's Trending 167 How to & Technical Guides 11 Computer Hardware 119 Software 3 Home Office 6 Networking Audio/Visual 2 Home Automation 16 3D Printers 10 Maker 16 PC Build Guides 96 Reviews & Buying Guides 34 Build Showcase 17 Contests 39 Past Contests 1K The Community 1.8K General Discussion 108 New Members 127 Consumer Tech 42 Prebuilt PCs and Laptops 78 Software 4 Audio/Visual 13 Networking & Security 1 Home Automation 2 Digital Photography 3 Content Creators 22 Hobby Boards & Projects 26 3D Printing 53 Retro Arcade/Gaming 86 All Other Tech 1.3K Store Information and Policy 51 Off Topic 5 Community Ideas & Feedback 113 Your Completed Builds 2.7K Build-Your-Own PC 1.7K Help Choosing Parts 225 Graphics Cards 172 CPUs, Memory, and Motherboards 62 Cases and Power Supplies 19 Air and Liquid Cooling 16 Monitors and Displays 30 Peripherals 10 All Other Parts 22 Featured Categories We love seeing what our customers build Submit photos and a description of your PC to our build showcase Submit Now Looking for a little inspiration? See other custom PC builds and get some ideas for what can be done View Build Showcase View builds by: AMD Processors Intel Processors RTX 3090 RTX 3080 RTX 2080 Ti RTX 2080 Super RTX 2070 Super RTX 2070 RTX 2060 Super Radeon RX 5700XT Radeon RX 5700 Air Cooled Liquid Cooled SAME DAY CUSTOM BUILD SERVICE If You Can Dream it, We Can Build it. Services starting at $149.99 More Details Micro Center Homepage Desktops Laptops Computer Parts Computer Accessories Custom PC Builder Build Showcase Networking Electronics 3D Printing Service, Upgrades & Repairs Laptop Battery Replacement Laptop Screen Repair Virus and Malware Removal Hard Drive Recovery and Backup Apple MacBook Repair Custom Built PCs Schedule an Appointment © Vanilla Foundation Theme 2021 Powered By Vanilla Community Article NVIDIA Special Event Announcement | GeForce RTX: Game On — Micro Center Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker {$smarty.capture.menu} Activity Categories Discussions Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker Home › Reviews & Buying Guides NVIDIA Special Event Announcement | GeForce RTX: Game On LandShark admin December 2020 edited June 3 in Reviews & Buying Guides https://www.nvidia.com/en-gb/geforce/special-event/ NVIDIA has just announced a special broadcast event on January 12th "Join us as we unveil the latest innovation in gaming and graphics." So far, very little they've shared very little about what they will announce on the 12th. January 12th is the day after the start of CES 2021, so we're expecting many new tech announcements and discussions around that time. I think the company will talk about its mobile GeForce RTX 30 series for the upcoming AMD Cezanne (Ryzen 5000) and Intel Comet Lake and Tiger Lake CPUs. What do you think it could be? Let us know in the comments below! 2 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Comments Ian admin January 9 This has kind of snuck up on us quick after the early announcement. Interested to see what takes place on Tuesday.  0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook SimiusV New York ✭ January 10 I agree about the mobile CPUs. Should be interesting. 1 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Ian admin January 12 edited January 12 At 12pm Eastern today: 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Leave a Comment Rich Text Editor. To edit a paragraph's style, hit tab to get to the paragraph menu. 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Categories 7K All Categories 1K The Blog 34 What's Trending 167 How to & Technical Guides 11 Computer Hardware 119 Software 3 Home Office 6 Networking Audio/Visual 2 Home Automation 16 3D Printers 10 Maker 16 PC Build Guides 96 Reviews & Buying Guides 34 Build Showcase 17 Contests 39 Past Contests 1K The Community 1.7K General Discussion 83 New Members 127 Consumer Tech 42 Prebuilt PCs and Laptops 78 Software 4 Audio/Visual 13 Networking & Security 1 Home Automation 2 Digital Photography 3 Content Creators 22 Hobby Boards & Projects 26 3D Printing 53 Retro Arcade/Gaming 86 All Other Tech 1.3K Store Information and Policy 51 Off Topic 6 Community Ideas & Feedback 113 Your Completed Builds 2.7K Build-Your-Own PC 1.7K Help Choosing Parts 227 Graphics Cards 172 CPUs, Memory, and Motherboards 62 Cases and Power Supplies 19 Air and Liquid Cooling 16 Monitors and Displays 30 Peripherals 10 All Other Parts 22 Featured Categories We love seeing what our customers build Submit photos and a description of your PC to our build showcase Submit Now Looking for a little inspiration? See other custom PC builds and get some ideas for what can be done View Build Showcase View builds by: AMD Processors Intel Processors RTX 3090 RTX 3080 RTX 2080 Ti RTX 2080 Super RTX 2070 Super RTX 2070 RTX 2060 Super Radeon RX 5700XT Radeon RX 5700 Air Cooled Liquid Cooled SAME DAY CUSTOM BUILD SERVICE If You Can Dream it, We Can Build it. Services starting at $149.99 More Details Micro Center Homepage Desktops Laptops Computer Parts Computer Accessories Custom PC Builder Build Showcase Networking Electronics 3D Printing Service, Upgrades & Repairs Laptop Battery Replacement Laptop Screen Repair Virus and Malware Removal Hard Drive Recovery and Backup Apple MacBook Repair Custom Built PCs Schedule an Appointment © Vanilla Foundation Theme 2021 Powered By Vanilla Community Article Need some advice on a new gaming build — Micro Center Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker {$smarty.capture.menu} Activity Categories Discussions Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker Home › Help Choosing Parts Need some advice on a new gaming build Curlymike ✭ July 2020 in Help Choosing Parts So, I killed my last older PC due to overspec by trying to stick an RX580 in a computer with 3-7 year old components (oops!). So, I'm in the market for a new motherboard, CPU, and GPU. I'd like to spend less than $300 for the CPU, $250 for the GPU, and $200 for the motherboard, but I'd also like to find the best I can get for that money. I also want to make it with an eye towards future upgrading should that time come (but if I can make something really good for that money, it won't be too necessary). If anyone has any suggestions, I'd be really appreciative for the support. Here'd the remaining specs from my previous build (that are still functional): Toshiba 1TB HDD (x2) Corsair Carbide Series Spec-02 Mid-Tower Case Corsair Vengeance LPX 8GB (x2) Corsair RMx 750W 80+Gold PSU (Brand New)  0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Comments Ian admin July 2020 Greetings. Depends if you wanted to go the AMD or Intel route. At $300 for the CPU the best values for gaming are: Intel) https://www.microcenter.com/product/622907/intel-core-i5-10600k-comet-lake-41ghz-six-core-lga-1200-boxed-processor  AMD) https://www.microcenter.com/product/608318/amd-ryzen-7-3700x-matisse-36ghz-8-core-am4-boxed-processor-with-wraith-prism-cooler For Intel motherboards, it would depend if you wanted Wi-Fi built in or not - they start at about $149 to support the new LGA 1200 Intel processors: https://www.microcenter.com/search/search_results.aspx?Ntt=lga+1200&Ntk=all&sortby=match&N=39&myStore=false For AMD motherboards, AM4 motherboard stock is quite low right now, but there are plenty of choices that would be fine under $200 - https://www.microcenter.com/search/search_results.aspx?Ntt=am4+motherboard&Ntk=all&sortby=match&N=38+39+37&myStore=false For a $250 video card you are looking at a 1660 Super in that price range, unless a 1660Ti drops to that price on sale. Any card like https://www.microcenter.com/product/615269/evga-geforce-gtx-1660-super-sc-ultra-overclocked-dual-fan-6gb-gddr6-pcie-30-graphics-card would be just fine.  1 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Curlymike ✭ July 2020 edited July 2020 TSIanL said: Greetings. Depends if you wanted to go the AMD or Intel route. At $300 for the CPU the best values for gaming are: Intel) https://www.microcenter.com/product/622907/intel-core-i5-10600k-comet-lake-41ghz-six-core-lga-1200-boxed-processor  AMD) https://www.microcenter.com/product/608318/amd-ryzen-7-3700x-matisse-36ghz-8-core-am4-boxed-processor-with-wraith-prism-cooler For Intel motherboards, it would depend if you wanted Wi-Fi built in or not - they start at about $149 to support the new LGA 1200 Intel processors: https://www.microcenter.com/search/search_results.aspx?Ntt=lga+1200&Ntk=all&sortby=match&N=39&myStore=false For AMD motherboards, AM4 motherboard stock is quite low right now, but there are plenty of choices that would be fine under $200 - https://www.microcenter.com/search/search_results.aspx?Ntt=am4+motherboard&Ntk=all&sortby=match&N=38+39+37&myStore=false For a $250 video card you are looking at a 1660 Super in that price range, unless a 1660Ti drops to that price on sale. Any card like https://www.microcenter.com/product/615269/evga-geforce-gtx-1660-super-sc-ultra-overclocked-dual-fan-6gb-gddr6-pcie-30-graphics-card would be just fine.  That all sounds pretty good. I was torn on AMD vs Intel. Which would be a better choice? I see that AMD is usually cheaper and better at multithread applications, but I've always used Intel.  And a 1660 was about what I was looking at. It looks like a really decent card for the money. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Ian admin July 2020 Curlymike said: TSIanL said: Greetings. Depends if you wanted to go the AMD or Intel route. At $300 for the CPU the best values for gaming are: Intel) https://www.microcenter.com/product/622907/intel-core-i5-10600k-comet-lake-41ghz-six-core-lga-1200-boxed-processor  AMD) https://www.microcenter.com/product/608318/amd-ryzen-7-3700x-matisse-36ghz-8-core-am4-boxed-processor-with-wraith-prism-cooler For Intel motherboards, it would depend if you wanted Wi-Fi built in or not - they start at about $149 to support the new LGA 1200 Intel processors: https://www.microcenter.com/search/search_results.aspx?Ntt=lga+1200&Ntk=all&sortby=match&N=39&myStore=false For AMD motherboards, AM4 motherboard stock is quite low right now, but there are plenty of choices that would be fine under $200 - https://www.microcenter.com/search/search_results.aspx?Ntt=am4+motherboard&Ntk=all&sortby=match&N=38+39+37&myStore=false For a $250 video card you are looking at a 1660 Super in that price range, unless a 1660Ti drops to that price on sale. Any card like https://www.microcenter.com/product/615269/evga-geforce-gtx-1660-super-sc-ultra-overclocked-dual-fan-6gb-gddr6-pcie-30-graphics-card would be just fine.  That all sounds pretty good. I was torn on AMD vs Intel. Which would be a better choice? I see that AMD is usually cheaper and better at multithread applications, but I've always used Intel.  And a 1660 was about what I was looking at. It looks like a really decent card for the money. The processors are extremely similar. If you look at benchmarks for games, the 10600k typically outperforms the Ryzen 3700x but the margin is slim. A downside to Intel is that you would need to purchase cooling for it, which the Ryzen would come with a capable cooler for that.  0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Categories 7K All Categories 1K The Blog 34 What's Trending 167 How to & Technical Guides 11 Computer Hardware 119 Software 3 Home Office 6 Networking Audio/Visual 2 Home Automation 16 3D Printers 10 Maker 16 PC Build Guides 96 Reviews & Buying Guides 34 Build Showcase 17 Contests 39 Past Contests 1K The Community 1.7K General Discussion 83 New Members 127 Consumer Tech 42 Prebuilt PCs and Laptops 78 Software 4 Audio/Visual 13 Networking & Security 1 Home Automation 2 Digital Photography 3 Content Creators 22 Hobby Boards & Projects 26 3D Printing 53 Retro Arcade/Gaming 86 All Other Tech 1.3K Store Information and Policy 51 Off Topic 6 Community Ideas & Feedback 113 Your Completed Builds 2.7K Build-Your-Own PC 1.7K Help Choosing Parts 227 Graphics Cards 172 CPUs, Memory, and Motherboards 62 Cases and Power Supplies 19 Air and Liquid Cooling 16 Monitors and Displays 30 Peripherals 10 All Other Parts 22 Featured Categories We love seeing what our customers build Submit photos and a description of your PC to our build showcase Submit Now Looking for a little inspiration? See other custom PC builds and get some ideas for what can be done View Build Showcase View builds by: AMD Processors Intel Processors RTX 3090 RTX 3080 RTX 2080 Ti RTX 2080 Super RTX 2070 Super RTX 2070 RTX 2060 Super Radeon RX 5700XT Radeon RX 5700 Air Cooled Liquid Cooled SAME DAY CUSTOM BUILD SERVICE If You Can Dream it, We Can Build it. Services starting at $149.99 More Details Micro Center Homepage Desktops Laptops Computer Parts Computer Accessories Custom PC Builder Build Showcase Networking Electronics 3D Printing Service, Upgrades & Repairs Laptop Battery Replacement Laptop Screen Repair Virus and Malware Removal Hard Drive Recovery and Backup Apple MacBook Repair Custom Built PCs Schedule an Appointment © Vanilla Foundation Theme 2021 Powered By Vanilla Community Article Feedback and a question regarding the custom builder — Micro Center Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker {$smarty.capture.menu} Activity Categories Discussions Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker Home › Help Choosing Parts Feedback and a question regarding the custom builder Crowek ✭ November 19 in Help Choosing Parts We'd like to build a computer under $3k that does not need a video card (have one on hand). Ideally I was looking for a 12th gen intel that can be upgraded to DDR5 ram later on. Below is the link to the build: https://www.microcenter.com/site/content/custom-pc-builder.aspx?load=df872b94-62a2-4303-ac53-dca2bcca2831 Questions are, The Alder Lake processors all say they are limited availability and to buy in store. I'd like to order online and have them build it for pick up at the store. Is this doable? How do I bypass the "sorry items not in stock" error related to the "limited availability" tag? Or is this something that would require calling ahead of time to confirm there is an i7-12700k available and then bringing the list on paper in? Trying to save an extra hour plus car trip by not having to go twice, if possible. Obviously the whole build is not possible if the 12th gen isn't available. I hummed and hawed on a few of these items. I'd like an opinion on the motherboard choices as I'm less familiar with them. I just wanted one that was DDR5 compliant and had adequate NVMe 4.0 support for the 980 Pro. Originally had an Elite AX listed here but it was labelled as DDR4. Is the Master overkill to an alternative I missed? Similarly I'm not familiar with the 5000D. I added fans as I believe the case only comes with 2. Is this unnecessary with a galahad on the front? I added a Windows 11 DVD as the operating system. Will MicroCenter be able to flash the bios and install this operating system without an optical drive? I assume they can just use the DVD windows key to install via USB? Would really like input on how best to go about building an Alder Lake with the PC Builder. Also the Live Chat function seems to be broken 🙂 Thanks, 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Comments Crowek ✭ November 20 My alternative and first pass was this build linked below. I made this because I was unsure about the availability of the 12th gen and ability to order for pick up in store. Would like feedback on these options + the questions above. The person who would be doing the pick up is less familiar with these so I want to make sure everything is covered prior to committing versus a prebuilt (hence the question about extra trips as well). https://www.microcenter.com/site/content/custom-pc-builder.aspx?load=115dd6a5-0158-4d9e-998a-70b4833ade65 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook magarity ✭ November 20 edited November 20 I'm planning to get a 5000D in white and from what I figure the two black fans that come with it totally wreck the look of the white case. So yeah, I would say that 3 pack of white fans is a good choice but you can use the black ones if you don't care about the appearance. I say give the black ones to a friend or keep them in a box for just in case you need a replacement. The fans on the AIO will blow in and then it relies on pressure to get the warmed air out the back and top (if there are no other fans). This will work "ok-ish" but honestly it does help to have fan power to push out. Fortunately the output fans can make a huge difference while only running like 50% or less, so they provide benefit while being nice and quiet. PS - You don't need to go LED fans for the output ones of course. Any white housing ones will look right and do the job. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Categories 7K All Categories 1K The Blog 33 What's Trending 167 How to & Technical Guides 11 Computer Hardware 119 Software 3 Home Office 6 Networking Audio/Visual 2 Home Automation 16 3D Printers 10 Maker 16 PC Build Guides 96 Reviews & Buying Guides 34 Build Showcase 17 Contests 39 Past Contests 1K The Community 1.8K General Discussion 108 New Members 127 Consumer Tech 42 Prebuilt PCs and Laptops 78 Software 4 Audio/Visual 13 Networking & Security 1 Home Automation 2 Digital Photography 3 Content Creators 22 Hobby Boards & Projects 26 3D Printing 53 Retro Arcade/Gaming 86 All Other Tech 1.3K Store Information and Policy 51 Off Topic 5 Community Ideas & Feedback 113 Your Completed Builds 2.7K Build-Your-Own PC 1.7K Help Choosing Parts 225 Graphics Cards 172 CPUs, Memory, and Motherboards 62 Cases and Power Supplies 19 Air and Liquid Cooling 16 Monitors and Displays 30 Peripherals 10 All Other Parts 22 Featured Categories We love seeing what our customers build Submit photos and a description of your PC to our build showcase Submit Now Looking for a little inspiration? See other custom PC builds and get some ideas for what can be done View Build Showcase View builds by: AMD Processors Intel Processors RTX 3090 RTX 3080 RTX 2080 Ti RTX 2080 Super RTX 2070 Super RTX 2070 RTX 2060 Super Radeon RX 5700XT Radeon RX 5700 Air Cooled Liquid Cooled SAME DAY CUSTOM BUILD SERVICE If You Can Dream it, We Can Build it. Services starting at $149.99 More Details Micro Center Homepage Desktops Laptops Computer Parts Computer Accessories Custom PC Builder Build Showcase Networking Electronics 3D Printing Service, Upgrades & Repairs Laptop Battery Replacement Laptop Screen Repair Virus and Malware Removal Hard Drive Recovery and Backup Apple MacBook Repair Custom Built PCs Schedule an Appointment © Vanilla Foundation Theme 2021 Powered By Vanilla