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Showing 120 of 126 for “concept green”
Community Article G464 Green Screen crash/reboot — Micro Center Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker {$smarty.capture.menu} Activity Categories Discussions Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker Home › General Discussion G464 Green Screen crash/reboot he_manMEOW ✭ December 2020 in General Discussion I recently purchased the g464 prebuilt.  Started playing AC:Valhalla and would randomly get crashes that turn the screen green w/ a buzzing. The computer immediately reboots as if nothing happened. I've tested it with AC: Orogins as well and dont get more than a minute of play time before I get the green screen of death. Everything appears to run fine until I start some gaming sessions. I have updated Windows using Windows assistant and that seemed to patch things until the following day and now I'm back to square one. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Comments AdamL ✭ December 2020 Hey! Your PC has an RX5700xt in there correct? If so, see if updating your GPU drivers helps out. These cards were notorious for having some pretty weird driver issues, but have since been fixed. A lot of prebuilts sit on the shelf for a bit and don't have the drivers updated (no fault to microcenter. that would take absolute ages to update the drivers on all their PCs haha). Let me know if this helped out! Also, if it doesn't Microcenter does offer in store tech support, and I'm sure their team could pin point the issue pretty quickly. If you're unsure about which drivers you need google "RX5700xt drivers Adrenaline" and it should be the first link. Select your OS, and then download the most recent drivers. As of this post they are Adrenalin 2020 Edition 20.11.1.  Hope this helped out so you can get back to gaming! 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Sign In or Register to comment. Howdy, Stranger! It looks like you're new here. If you want to get involved, click one of these buttons! Sign In with Micro Center Register Sign In with Micro Center Sign In Register Categories 6.3K All Categories 964 The Blog 42 What's Trending 146 How to & Technical Guides 6 Computer Hardware 116 Software 3 Home Office 5 Networking Audio/Visual 1 Home Automation 14 3D Printers 1 Maker 12 PC Build Guides 55 Reviews & Buying Guides 17 Build Showcase 9 Contests 32 Past Contests 401 The Community 1.4K General Discussion 89 New Members 31 Consumer Tech 11 Prebuilt PCs and Laptops 64 Software 2 Audio/Visual 2 Networking & Security Home Automation 2 Digital Photography 3 Content Creators 21 Hobby Boards & Projects 19 3D Printing 43 Retro Arcade/Gaming 73 All Other Tech 1.1K Store Information and Policy 41 Off Topic 2 Community Ideas & Feedback 108 Your Completed Builds 2.5K Build-Your-Own PC 1.6K Help Choosing Parts 205 Graphics Cards 150 CPU's, Memory and Motherboards 57 Cases and Power Supplies 18 Air and Liquid Cooling 10 Monitors and Displays 26 Peripherals 6 All Other Parts 15 Featured Categories We love seeing what our customers build Submit photos and a description of your PC to our build showcase Submit Now Looking for a little inspiration? See other custom PC builds and get some ideas for what can be done View Build Showcase View builds by: AMD Processors Intel Processors RTX 3090 RTX 3080 RTX 2080 Ti RTX 2080 Super RTX 2070 Super RTX 2070 RTX 2060 Super Radeon RX 5700XT Radeon RX 5700 Air Cooled Liquid Cooled SAME DAY CUSTOM BUILD SERVICE If You Can Dream it, We Can Build it. Services starting at $149.99 More Details Micro Center Homepage Desktops Laptops Computer Parts Computer Accessories Custom PC Builder Build Showcase Networking Electronics 3D Printing Service, Upgrades & Repairs Laptop Battery Replacement Laptop Screen Repair Virus and Malware Removal Hard Drive Recovery and Backup Apple MacBook Repair Custom Built PCs Schedule an Appointment © Vanilla Foundation Theme 2021 Powered By Vanilla Community Article PowerSpec G507 - Green screen crashes — Micro Center Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker {$smarty.capture.menu} Activity Categories Discussions Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker Home › General Discussion PowerSpec G507 - Green screen crashes JonN ✭ July 2020 edited January 15 in General Discussion I received my PowerSpec G507 (AMD Radeon 3600 processor and AMD RX 5700 GPU) desktop on 7/4/20 (actually purchased two).  One of the computers has had problems with the GPU as every once in a while it green screens and then restarts the system.  It has happened 7 times (in a little over 8 days) since I got it. 5 times I was playing a game called Destiny 2 and the other two times was when I brought up Chrome and the AMD Radeon Software.  The other G507 computer did receive a black screen the first day but once we updated the driver to 20.5.1 through the AMD Radeon Software it has been working fine. I have updated to the latest drivers (both 20.5.1 and 20.7.1) through the AMD Radeon Software but after getting four green screens in one day I followed the instructions on the Micro Center website and downloaded the DDU driver remover and removed the driver.  I installed the driver from the Micro Center website for the Radeon 5700 (20.1.3) and it worked great all day yesterday.  I was in game for close to 14 hours without a green screen.  Unfortunately, I had a green screen this morning when I brought up my browser - Chrome.   I have also updated to the latest Motherboard drivers for the ASRock B450M/AC.  I have not overclocked my CPU or GPU since it does not seem stable enough, besides it runs fast just like it is.    I chatted with someone on the Micro Center website and they directed me here.   I have been monitoring the GPU temp using the AMD Radeon software and it seems fine.  Any other suggestions? 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Comments TSMichaelB admin July 2020 JonN said: I received my PowerSpec G507 (AMD Radeon 3600 processor and AMD RX 5700 GPU) desktop on 7/4/20 (actually purchased two).  One of the computers has had problems with the GPU as every once in a while it green screens and then restarts the system.  It has happened 7 times (in a little over 8 days) since I got it. 5 times I was playing a game called Destiny 2 and the other two times was when I brought up Chrome and the AMD Radeon Software.  The other G507 computer did receive a black screen the first day but once we updated the driver to 20.5.1 through the AMD Radeon Software it has been working fine. I have updated to the latest drivers (both 20.5.1 and 20.7.1) through the AMD Radeon Software but after getting four green screens in one day I followed the instructions on the Micro Center website and downloaded the DDU driver remover and removed the driver.  I installed the driver from the Micro Center website for the Radeon 5700 (20.1.3) and it worked great all day yesterday.  I was in game for close to 14 hours without a green screen.  Unfortunately, I had a green screen this morning when I brought up my browser - Chrome.   I have also updated to the latest Motherboard drivers for the ASRock B450M/AC.  I have not overclocked my CPU or GPU since it does not seem stable enough, besides it runs fast just like it is.    I chatted with someone on the Micro Center website and they directed me here.   I have been monitoring the GPU temp using the AMD Radeon software and it seems fine.  Any other suggestions? Welcome to the forum, @JonN, sorry to hear you're having issues with your PowerSpec G507. It's odd that reverting the driver down to 20.1.3 allowed you to use the system for so long without an issue, yet it presented itself again today. During that time, do you recall any updates that may have been performed? Can you double-check the version of the graphics driver to see if it updated? Lastly, I believe the G507 ships with Windows 10 1909. Can you attempt to update it to Windows 10 2004 and see if that helps at all? My initial thoughts is that WDDM (Windows Display Driver Model) might be corrupted, causing the graphics driver to break over time, or simply handling it improperly. Updating to Windows 10 2004 should get you a brand new version of WDDM as well to go with your GPU.  Here is a link to the update: https://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkID=799445.  If this fails, we may need to perform a clean installation of Windows 10 using the media creation tool: https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/software-download/windows10. This will rule out any OS corruption and other software issues, but I would use it as a last ditch effort as we'd like to try to avoid having to reinstall applications unless absolutely necessary. Let us know the results. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook JonN ✭ July 2020 Thank you for the quick response and welcoming me to the forum.  I checked the AMD Radeon software and the driver is still 20.1.3 and offers to upgrade to 20.7.1.  I did not update anything else after I removed the driver using the DDU driver remover and installed the 20.1.3 driver.  You are correct the G507 ships with Windows 10 1909 but I was not able to upgrade it to Windows 10 2004.  It gave the following:  This PC can't be upgraded to Window 10. Your PC settings aren't supported yet on this version of Window 10.  Microsoft is working to support your settings soon.  No action is needed.  Windows Update will offer this version of Windows 10 automatically when these settings are support. Do I need to perform a clean install like you suggested above? 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook TSMichaelB admin July 2020 It's interesting that it gave you that error. A clean installation would be ideal as it would rule out any of the aforementioned corruption issues with WDDM and would rule out software entirely as the culprit. If you do go that route, be mindful that you'll need to reinstall your applications, so a data backup would be recommended if you have the means of doing so. In the meantime, I'll grab a G507 and see if I am presented with the same error when attempting to perform the in-place upgrade. The hardware configuration is definitely compatible with Windows 10 2004. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook JonN ✭ July 2020 I tried to upgrade to Windows 10 2004 a second time and got the same error.  If I do a clean install do I have to download and reinstall the games that I have added or does it just re install windows? 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook TSMichaelB admin July 2020 JonN said: I tried to upgrade to Windows 10 2004 a second time and got the same error.  If I do a clean install do I have to download and reinstall the games that I have added or does it just re install windows? Correct, a clean installation will remove anything on the system including your games and personal folders/documents. If you have a means to backup your data to an external drive, I would recommend doing so to save you time from having to redownload everything.  0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook JonN ✭ July 2020 edited July 2020 I will do it today.  What GPU driver should I install 20.1.3 or 20.7.1?  Also the link you gave me to reinstall Windows 10 is Windows 10 Pro or does it go by the key I will use? 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook TSMichaelB admin July 2020 I would recommend trying the latest graphics driver as that will have the best optimizations for the newest video games. As for the installation, the tool should automatically determine the version you need during the download. The G507 shipped with Windows 10 Pro, so that should be fine. The Windows 10 license key is embedded in the board firmware so it will automatically activate Windows when a network connection is established after installation, so you shouldn't need to do much more other than download drivers and test your games. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook JonN ✭ July 2020 Sounds good, thank you, I will give it a try. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook JonN ✭ July 2020 I was able to do a clean install of Windows 10 Pro and it even installed 2004 like you wanted.  Not sure why it would not upgrade to it before though.  I believe I installed all the drivers for the Asrock motherboard and the Radeon RX 5700 gpu but the Device Manager is showing under Other devices - PIC Device (2) and PCI Encryption/Decryption Controller (1) with a ! next to it.  Not sure if I have given you enough information but what driver am I missing? 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook TSMichaelB admin July 2020 JonN said: I was able to do a clean install of Windows 10 Pro and it even installed 2004 like you wanted.  Not sure why it would not upgrade to it before though.  I believe I installed all the drivers for the Asrock motherboard and the Radeon RX 5700 gpu but the Device Manager is showing under Other devices - PIC Device (2) and PCI Encryption/Decryption Controller (1) with a ! next to it.  Not sure if I have given you enough information but what driver am I missing? Sounds like it's missing a piece of the chipset driver. Give this a shot: https://drivers.amd.com/drivers/amd_chipset_software_2.04.28.626.exe. This will get you the latest AMD B450 chipset drivers which should include the PCIe subdomain controller. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook JonN ✭ July 2020 That was it, thank you. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook TSMichaelB admin July 2020 Awesome! Let us know if you still experience the green screen issue. We'll do whatever we can to help get to the bottom of it. 1 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook JonN ✭ July 2020 Unfortunately it just green screen again and the system restarted.  I was playing Destiny 2 and used alt tab and brought up File Explorer and the green screen happened.  It was working fine until right now.  I have the latest Radeon RX 5700 drivers per the software which is 20.7.2.   What should I do now? 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook TSMichaelB admin July 2020 Hmm, let's check your AMD settings to see if anything stands out. Can you attach a picture of the following graphics settings page? You can reach this by right clicking your desktop, selecting AMD Radeon Software, then click the gear icon, followed by Graphics. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook JonN ✭ July 2020 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook JonN ✭ July 2020 edited July 2020 It should be the default settings as I have not made any changes except for changing it to Gaming. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook TSMikeW admin July 2020 Could you open programs and features (appwiz.cpl from run) and show us a screenshot of the programs you have installed? 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook JonN ✭ July 2020 Here is what I have installed.  0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook TSMikeW admin July 2020 Nothing there that's likely to be a culprit here. Lets try something different. First, lets run DDU again. Make sure to select the option to disable automatic driver updates, so that it doesn't install a driver. After you reboot. I would like you to download the AMD drivers. Extract the package with 7zip then we'll do a manual update from Device Manager. Update driver software on the "Microsoft Basic Display Adapter" then choose the option to browse, and direct it to the extracted folder. Let it find a driver only and not install Radeon package, and we'll see if the issue persists. This should tell us whether it's an issue with the GPU itself, or if it's an issue with a profile that's being applied to the card. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook JonN ✭ July 2020 Alright I have installed the AMD Radeon RX 5700 driver only through Device manager without the AMD Software.  I will let you know how it goes.  If it turns out it is a GPU issue am I able to RMA the GPU only or do I have to send in the entire desktop?  I am hoping the GPU only as it would take me only a minute to install and I would not have to wait days/weeks to get the computer sent to only install a new GPU and ship it back.  Also if this works fine now aren't I losing out on free sync and maybe something else without the software installed?  Thanks again for all your help. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook JonN ✭ July 2020 I had another green screen / restart just now.  I will start the RMA process.  Thank you for all your help. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook JayM ✭ August 2020 I am having the same issue with my PowreSpec G358 (i7-10700 & AMD Radeon RX 5700XT). 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Ian admin August 2020 JayM said: I am having the same issue with my PowreSpec G358 (i7-10700 & AMD Radeon RX 5700XT). Greetings, have you tried any of the troubleshooting steps in this thread? If not, I would start by doing a clean install with DDU of your graphics drivers. We have a step by step guide for that process at https://community.microcenter.com/discussion/2858/how-to-roll-back-or-clean-install-video-card-drivers-in-windows-10#latest  0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook M123 ✭ November 2020 Also running into a similar issue with the powerspec G507 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook M123 ✭ November 2020 update: I did a clean install with DDU and updated Windows 10 which seems to have fixed the problem for now 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook LandShark admin November 2020 Glad to hear that your issue has been resolved for now. Keep us posted! 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Sign In or Register to comment. Howdy, Stranger! It looks like you're new here. If you want to get involved, click one of these buttons! Sign In with Micro Center Register Sign In with Micro Center Sign In Register Categories 6.3K All Categories 964 The Blog 42 What's Trending 146 How to & Technical Guides 6 Computer Hardware 116 Software 3 Home Office 5 Networking Audio/Visual 1 Home Automation 14 3D Printers 1 Maker 12 PC Build Guides 55 Reviews & Buying Guides 17 Build Showcase 9 Contests 32 Past Contests 402 The Community 1.4K General Discussion 89 New Members 31 Consumer Tech 11 Prebuilt PCs and Laptops 64 Software 2 Audio/Visual 2 Networking & Security Home Automation 2 Digital Photography 3 Content Creators 21 Hobby Boards & Projects 19 3D Printing 43 Retro Arcade/Gaming 73 All Other Tech 1.1K Store Information and Policy 41 Off Topic 2 Community Ideas & Feedback 108 Your Completed Builds 2.5K Build-Your-Own PC 1.6K Help Choosing Parts 205 Graphics Cards 150 CPU's, Memory and Motherboards 57 Cases and Power Supplies 18 Air and Liquid Cooling 10 Monitors and Displays 26 Peripherals 6 All Other Parts 15 Featured Categories We love seeing what our customers build Submit photos and a description of your PC to our build showcase Submit Now Looking for a little inspiration? See other custom PC builds and get some ideas for what can be done View Build Showcase View builds by: AMD Processors Intel Processors RTX 3090 RTX 3080 RTX 2080 Ti RTX 2080 Super RTX 2070 Super RTX 2070 RTX 2060 Super Radeon RX 5700XT Radeon RX 5700 Air Cooled Liquid Cooled SAME DAY CUSTOM BUILD SERVICE If You Can Dream it, We Can Build it. Services starting at $149.99 More Details Micro Center Homepage Desktops Laptops Computer Parts Computer Accessories Custom PC Builder Build Showcase Networking Electronics 3D Printing Service, Upgrades & Repairs Laptop Battery Replacement Laptop Screen Repair Virus and Malware Removal Hard Drive Recovery and Backup Apple MacBook Repair Custom Built PCs Schedule an Appointment © Vanilla Foundation Theme 2021 Powered By Vanilla Community Article BYOPC - Work Bar Area (Concept Idea) — Micro Center Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker {$smarty.capture.menu} Activity Categories Discussions Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker Home › General Discussion BYOPC - Work Bar Area (Concept Idea) Ravenous26 ✭ November 2020 edited June 7 in General Discussion With the surge of water cooling, new products, and (new)users building new systems I was thinking how cool it would be if there was a small area for shoppers, to after purchasing their parts have a small lab/work area with basic tools for them to start their build there before even leaving. More so if basic water cooling supplies were there (ie heat gun, leak tester). Being there at the facility would help new users with basic questions they may have from experts and drive the hobby of system building. The concept would open up a unique window of encouraging same day shopping. No matter how good someone designs their system it almost seems like something is forgotten, cable here, a bit more tubing, a fitting or two, a bracket? How many of those sales are then lost to newegg, ek, or amazon because the customer does not want to make another drive out (sometimes 30-90 miles)? Or better yet as they are building an idea strikes and while they are already there building, it is easy enough for them to buy what they need and continue to work. Stock the area with purchasable food and drinks as well as a staff member eager to help with the basics of properly installing a cpu to going over XMP profiles, the member that was in and out in 20 minutes is now there for hours (learning and well more then likely more money spent) 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Comments LandShark admin November 2020 Great idea @Ravenous26. Pre-COVID we used to offer in-store clinics that would teach things like Build Your Own basics or Introduction to Windows 10 and other various classes. It's possible that something like your idea may not have been considered before. I'd be glad to pass along the concept to our leadership at our corporate office! Thanks for sharing! 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Ravenous26 ✭ November 2020 edited November 2020 Appreciate it LandShark, it is why I posted it. Before getting into IT I spent 14 years in retail. I really think there is an solid business opportunity for a "WorkCenter Bar" for customers if done right to drive not only the hobby but more potential sales. I will say while covid will not make it possible today, however plenty of time to plan out, brainstorm, and concept some basic ideas. Have done countless builds and over the last 7 years several watercooling systems. Would admit it would be awesome to have a BYOB lounge area to work in (as well I always seem to find myself making 2-4 trips before breaking down and ordering online as what not as my ideas and plan I drafted out changes as I am working or forget something silly (or worse yet in a hurry not pay attention and accidentally grab the wrong size of this or that). Between tools, maybe basic components that can be temporarily checked out such as cpu's for bios upgrades (for users confident in doing that themselves),  things like radiators and such that can be checked out/borrowed to see how fitting and spacing would be like for a finished project before the shopping, vertical gpu brackets again to see how things would fit before finalizing! 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Sign In or Register to comment. Howdy, Stranger! It looks like you're new here. If you want to get involved, click one of these buttons! Sign In with Micro Center Register Sign In with Micro Center Sign In Register Categories 6.3K All Categories 964 The Blog 42 What's Trending 146 How to & Technical Guides 6 Computer Hardware 116 Software 3 Home Office 5 Networking Audio/Visual 1 Home Automation 14 3D Printers 1 Maker 12 PC Build Guides 55 Reviews & Buying Guides 17 Build Showcase 9 Contests 32 Past Contests 402 The Community 1.4K General Discussion 89 New Members 31 Consumer Tech 11 Prebuilt PCs and Laptops 64 Software 2 Audio/Visual 2 Networking & Security Home Automation 2 Digital Photography 3 Content Creators 21 Hobby Boards & Projects 19 3D Printing 43 Retro Arcade/Gaming 73 All Other Tech 1.1K Store Information and Policy 41 Off Topic 2 Community Ideas & Feedback 108 Your Completed Builds 2.5K Build-Your-Own PC 1.6K Help Choosing Parts 205 Graphics Cards 150 CPU's, Memory and Motherboards 57 Cases and Power Supplies 18 Air and Liquid Cooling 10 Monitors and Displays 26 Peripherals 6 All Other Parts 15 Featured Categories We love seeing what our customers build Submit photos and a description of your PC to our build showcase Submit Now Looking for a little inspiration? See other custom PC builds and get some ideas for what can be done View Build Showcase View builds by: AMD Processors Intel Processors RTX 3090 RTX 3080 RTX 2080 Ti RTX 2080 Super RTX 2070 Super RTX 2070 RTX 2060 Super Radeon RX 5700XT Radeon RX 5700 Air Cooled Liquid Cooled SAME DAY CUSTOM BUILD SERVICE If You Can Dream it, We Can Build it. Services starting at $149.99 More Details Micro Center Homepage Desktops Laptops Computer Parts Computer Accessories Custom PC Builder Build Showcase Networking Electronics 3D Printing Service, Upgrades & Repairs Laptop Battery Replacement Laptop Screen Repair Virus and Malware Removal Hard Drive Recovery and Backup Apple MacBook Repair Custom Built PCs Schedule an Appointment © Vanilla Foundation Theme 2021 Powered By Vanilla Community Article What You Can Do With Home Automation - Micro Center Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker {$smarty.capture.menu} Activity Categories Discussions Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker What You Can Do With Home Automation - Micro Center Home Automation … What does that mean? Some might think back on the 1962 cartoon series The Jetsons and how in retrospect the Home Automation products of today bear a striking resemblance to their idea of the future. What can you do with Home Automation? We could talk all day about what Home Automation is and what it can do and yet not scratch the surface, but here are just a few examples of the things you can do: Manage your in-home temperature settings to maximize comfort and energy efficiency Control music, video, and entertainment sources within your home Turn lights on and off as well as dim or brighten them to set a mood, or even make RGB art and patterns with strips of lights. Interact with household appliances - brew coffee or cook dinner at pre-determined times Operate home security system components, cameras, door locks, and related items Open and close garage doors, window blinds, or curtains and be able to check all of these remotely The possibilities could be endless! Need an idea or a refresher of what items fall into the Home Automation category? Check out the Home Automation section on our website! So, you might be asking - How you can do all of this? Use your smartphone or tablet with apps designed for this purpose Use your desktop or laptop computer and a web browser Operate system control panels installed in your home Program individual devices or groups of devices to run automatically on a schedule Home Automation is becoming more popular, available, and affordable than ever before, and you too can join the excitement once you understand some basic concepts about how it all comes together. Let's take a look at how home automation devices communicate. © Vanilla Foundation Theme 2021 Powered By Vanilla Community Article How to Add a Protection Plan - Micro Center Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker {$smarty.capture.menu} Activity Categories Discussions Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker How to Add a Protection Plan - Micro Center Presale Most Micro Center Protection Plans can be added when placing an in-store reservation on our website. Protection plan options are usually listed in four areas on our website: On the item’s product page in the “Protect Your Investment” section located under the green “Add to Cart” button. On the “Add-ons” tab on the item’s product page. On the page that appears between clicking the green “Add to Cart” and “Proceed to Cart” buttons. Underneath the item on the shopping cart page. If protection plan options are not listed for an item on the website, see associate in-store for available options. Protection plans cannot be added through the website for shipment orders. Please contact Micro Center Online at 614-850-3675 for assistance. Post-Sale For in-store purchases, customers can add a Micro Center Protection Plan to a product within that product’s return policy by returning to the store with their receipt, a method of payment and the product. The condition of the product usually needs to be evaluated before the protection plan can be added. For purchases from shipment orders, please contact Micro Center Online at 614-850-3675 for assistance. © Vanilla Foundation Theme 2021 Powered By Vanilla Community Article Keyboard Buying Guide: Mechanical Or Membrane? - Micro Center Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker {$smarty.capture.menu} Activity Categories Discussions Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker Keyboard Buying Guide: Mechanical Or Membrane? - Micro Center Virtually everybody uses a keyboard on a daily basis, be it the built-in set of keys on a laptop or a separate one that’s connected to a desktop PC. Many of us don’t pay that much thought to these ubiquitous peripherals, but if you’re finding that your cheap keyboard isn’t cutting it any longer and it’s time for an upgrade, we’re here to help. In this guide, we lay out the differences between membrane and mechanical keyboards, compare the most common mechanical switch types, and bring you up to speed with everything else you need to know before you buy. The Redragon K556-RK (Brown Switches) What is the difference between membrane and mechanical keyboards? Keyboards are generally broken down into two broad categories: Membrane keyboards and mechanical keyboards. These terms refer to the way in which the keys interface with the keyboard’s circuit board, which reads your key presses and sends the inputs to your computer. Membrane keyboards are more common today due to their simplicity and low cost of manufacturing. On a membrane keyboard, the keys sit on a rubber overlay – the namesake membrane – which then sits on the circuit board. When you press a key, it pushes on the membrane and registers a keystroke. The advantages of membrane keyboards are that they’re simple, quiet, and cheap to make. The drawbacks of membrane keyboards are that they are considerably less precise than mechanical keyboards (that is, keystrokes may not always register quickly or accurately) and typically do not provide the pleasant tactile feedback that many typists and gamers prefer. Some membrane keyboards may even start to feel “mushy” after a while. Inland iC100 Keyboard & Mouse Combo (Membrane) Enter mechanical keyboards: Instead of a one-piece rubber membrane that registers keystrokes when keys are pressed, mechanical keyboards assign individual switches to every single key. This keyboard design is naturally more complex (and therefore more expensive to produce), but in decades past, mechanical switches were the norm. If you used computers in the ‘80s or ‘90s, for instance, then you’ve almost certainly typed on a mechanical keyboard before, maybe without even realizing it. Perhaps you actually remember how good those old keyboards felt (or how clicky, heavy, and noisy they could be) and wonder why keyboards today don’t feel quite the same. Now you know. Mechanical keyboards are greatly preferred by people who do a lot of typing, such as writers, as well as gamers who demand more comfort and precision from their PC accessories than most users (I include myself among both groups). Thankfully, mechanical keyboard switches never completely disappeared, and the internet has allowed for something of a renaissance in mechanical keyboard design in recent years. In fact, you’ve now got more choices than ever when shopping around for a mechanical keyboard – wired, wireless, full-size, compact, you name it – and that’s before you even start looking at the sprawling number of different keyboard makers, switch types, and switch manufacturers out there. Now that you’ve got the basics down, though, we can dive deeper down the rabbit hole of switch types and their characteristics. Logitech G G513 (GX Red, Linear) What is the difference between mechanical keyboard switches? Although most mechanical keyboards from decades past (such as the iconic IBM Model M) utilized a switch design known as a “buckling spring,” modern mechanical keyboards are a bit different. The vast majority of today’s mechanical keyboards feature Cherry MX switches, which remain the gold standard, or their off-brand derivatives. These non-Cherry MX keyboard switches are generally referred to as “Cherry clones,” which is not necessarily a term of derision as several of today’s off-brand switch makers are well regarded by mechanical keyboard users. Gateron, Kailh, and Outemu are three popular “Cherry clone” brands and you’ll often see these switches on competitively priced keyboards. Of these, Gateron is arguably the most highly rated, with many users claiming that these keyboard switches are even slightly smoother than Cherry MX in some cases. Switches of this style, whether Cherry MX or clones, are categorized by colors which are typically equivalent between makers (e.g. a Gateron brown keyboard switch is roughly the same as a Cherry MX brown switch). There are quite a few to choose from today but the most common are red, brown, blue, and green, and those are the ones we recommend you stick with unless you are already familiar with mechanical keyboards and have more specific needs. These colors designate the typing characteristics of a particular keyboard switch. These include actuation weight, or the amount of force needed to depress the switch enough to register a keystroke; tactile feedback, or whether the keypress is tactile or linear; and noise level, or whether the keys are relatively quiet or “clicky” and loud when pressed. SteelSeries Apex 7 (Blue Switch) “Tactile” and “linear” are terms you’ll see a lot when looking at mechanical keyboard switches, and refer to the physical sensation of each keypress. A tactile switch has a soft “bump” which you will feel when you press the key down to the actuation point (hence the switch’s “tactile” namesake). A linear keyboard switch is non-tactile, meaning that the keystroke will be totally smooth with no tactile bump. The choice between tactile and linear keyboard switches boils down to preference. Both have their advantages: Gamers, for instance, might prefer a linear switch, as the smooth keystroke makes quick, successive key presses (such as double-taps) slightly faster. On the other hand, many typists enjoy the physical feedback of tactile switches. You may want to test out both if you get a chance to see which style you prefer before buying. As far as the most common types go, Cherry MX red keyboard switches, such as those found on the Corsair K70, are linear, quiet switches with a medium actuation force of 45 centinewtons (cN). Cherry MX brown switch keyboards are similar, but these keys are tactile with an actuation force of 55cN. These are two are very popular and well-rounded switches for common typing tasks like writing and gaming, and they’re a good place to start if you’re new to mechanical keyboards. Corsair K70 RBG MK.2 (Cherry MX Red) Cherry MX blue switch keyboards are both tactile and clicky, meaning that you will not only feel but also hear the tactile bump during each keystroke. These switches feature a heavier actuation force of 60cN as well. Cherry MX green switch keyboards (and clones from brands like Razer) are tactile, clicky, and even heavier still, with an 80cN actuation force – if you’ve never used green switches before or you have a light touch while typing, you might find your fingers actually feeling slightly sore after using these for awhile. What are the noise levels of various switches? Mechanical keyboard switches are generally noisier than their non-mechanical counterparts, but there are audible differences between switch types. Aside from terms like “tactile” and “linear,” you’ll see switches described as “clicky” and “non-clicky.” These admittedly aren’t the most technical terms, but they’re fairly straightforward in that they refer to the noise output of each keystroke. Red and brown switch keyboards are non-clicky, and so are a bit quieter than blue and green switch keyboards (red being the quietest mechanical keyboard switches of these four popular switch types due to their linear, non-tactile operation). People immediately around you will hear you typing, and you will hear yourself typing, but not to the point of being disruptive. Clicky blue and green switch keyboards, on the other hand, are somewhat notorious for the amount of noise they create. This makes them less than ideal for office environments, which might be a problem for some as these switches are often favored by those who do a lot of writing, data entry, and other precise typing-heavy tasks. This is something to bear in mind if you’re going to be using your mechanical keyboard in a shared environment. Razer BlackWidow V3 (Green Switch) © Vanilla Foundation Theme 2021 Powered By Vanilla Community Article Using the Raspberry Pi Pico — Micro Center Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker {$smarty.capture.menu} Activity Categories Discussions Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker Home › Consumer Tech › Hobby Boards & Projects Using the Raspberry Pi Pico SeanM admin January 19 edited January 22 in Hobby Boards & Projects The freshly-released Pico is Raspberry Pi's first venture into Arduino boards. But without an on-board OS like Raspberry Pi's other boards, the Pico's utility is a bit more niche and might require a bit of an explanation for newcomers and veterans alike. That's where we come in. Getting Started with MicroPython The Raspberry Pi Pico is very straightforward. You'll need a Linux, Windows, Mac PC, or a Raspberry Pi set up as a desktop. You'll need to install MicroPython on your Pico. Visit https://pico.raspberrypi.org/getting-started/ and click on "Getting started with MicroPython." Download the UF2 file and follow the instructions under "Drag and drop MicroPython." You'll also need to download and install Thonny. Thonny is a Python Integrated Development Environment, or IDE and console in one, allowing you to write code and interact with the Pico in the same program. Thonny is available on all platforms and is preinstalled on the Raspberry Pi OS. Thonny Setup After installing and launching Thonny, click "Select Interpreter" under "Run." Next, set the interpreter to "Micro Python (Generic)" and choose the proper port. I've had good luck with the automatic port selection option, but you may need to select a port manually.   Hello World Script Our first script will be the classic "Hello World" script. Enter the following text in the text editor: print("Hello World") Then click the "Run" icon under "View" and "Run" in the menu bar. It's a green circle with a white "play" icon in it. Thonny will ask where you would like to save the file. Select MicroPython device and give the file a descriptive name, like "hello.py" – make sure to include the .py. You should see the text "Hello World" in the terminal at the bottom of the window. Setting up LED Blink Our next script will be a single blinking LED. Using a breadboard, an LED, and a 1k resistor, wire up the following circuit: In this circuit, we connected the positive side of the LED to GPIO 1 and the negative side ground with a 1k resistor. This resistor is called a current limiting resistor, and it reduces the amount of current flowing through the circuit by increasing the total resistance of the circuit. The value of this resistor isn't significant. A few hundred ohms is adequate. The higher the value of the resistor, the dimmer the LED will be. Current limiting resistors serve to protect the LED and keep it from burning out. Since the Pico uses 3.3v logic, you can usually get away without a current limiting resistor, but it's a good idea to include one to be safe. Replace the hello world code with the following code and run it as described above: import machine #library for hardware; allows us to access pins import time #for delays redLed = machine.Pin(1, machine.Pin.OUT) #initialize GPIO 1 as output for red LED while (1): #infinite loop; runs until manually stopped redLed.toggle() #if LED is on, turn off. Else, turn on. time.sleep(.5) #pause for 1/2 second
This will turn the LED on for half a second then off for half a second until the code is interrupted. You may have noticed some words change colors when you paste or type this into Thonny. Thonny highlights specific keywords to make them easier to identify. For example, control keywords (like "while" and "import") are bold magenta, and strings (anything surrounded by quotation marks) are green. Comments, which are anything preceded by a #, show up in light gray. These aren't part of the code but are used to explain what the code is doing. We can make things a little more interesting by wiring up this circuit: This is essentially the same circuit as the last example, but it has been duplicated two times. After wiring up this circuit, run the following code: import machine #library for hardware; allows us to access pins import time #for delays redLed = machine.Pin(1, machine.Pin.OUT) #initialize GPIO 1 as output for red LED yellowLed = machine.Pin(2, machine.Pin.OUT) #initialize GPIO 2 as output for yellow LED greenLed = machine.Pin(3, machine.Pin.OUT) #initialize GPIO 3 as output for green LED redLed.value(0) #Turn off red LED yellowLed.value(0) #turn off yellow LED greenLed.value(0) #turn off green LED while (1): #infinite loop; runs until manually stopped redLed.toggle() time.sleep(.5) redLed.toggle() yellowLed.toggle() time.sleep(.5) yellowLed.toggle() greenLed.toggle() time.sleep(.5) greenLed.toggle() yellowLed.toggle() time.sleep(.5) yellowLed.toggle()   The LEDs will flash in red, yellow, green, and yellow until the script is interrupted.   Pushbutton Input Next, we'll look at some simple inputs with a pushbutton. Wire up this circuit using the same components we used before, plus a pushbutton: Here we have removed the yellow LED and installed a pushbutton. One side of the button is wired to GPIO 4, and the other is wired to 3.3v. Notice we're using two legs on opposite corners of the pushbutton rather than the same side. It is the easiest way to ensure the contacts you use aren't connected inside the switch. Next, load and run this code:

import machine #library for hardware; allows us to access pins import time #for delays redLed = machine.Pin(1, machine.Pin.OUT) #initialize GPIO 1 as output for red LED greenLed = machine.Pin(3, machine.Pin.OUT) #initialize GPIO 3 as output for green LED button = machine.Pin(4,machine.Pin.IN) #initialize GPIO 4 as input for button redLed.value(0) #set LED initial values greenLed.value(1) while(1): if button.value(): #if button is pressed, button.value == 1 redLed.toggle() #Toggle the LEDs greenLed.toggle() time.sleep(.5) #Pause for half a second #If the button isn't pressed nothing happens and the while loop executes again

  When you push the button, both lights will toggle. Either the red or green LED will always be on, but never both at the same time. If you hold the button, the lights will toggle every half second until you let go. The delay in the while loop causes this. This delay also slows down the code's execution. If you remove it, the lights will flash faster than you can press the button, causing it to flash multiple times each time you press the button.   While these examples are straightforward, they form the building blocks of many projects. The LEDs could be replaced with buzzers, motors via an H bridge or other motor controller, or brighter 12v LEDs via a MOSFET or relay. The pushbutton could be replaced with a bump switch, PIR motion sensor, or photoresistor. Beyond the basic digital I/O we covered in these examples, the Pico also supports several serial protocols, including IIC and SPI, allowing you to connect a vast range of sensors, displays, and other I/O devices. The Pico also supports pulse width modulation (or PWM) and analog inputs. PWM can be used to vary the intensity of LEDs or drive servos, and analog inputs can be used to take readings from potentiometers, thermistors, or photoresistors. Since it's all programmed in MicroPython, any libraries or tutorials written for other MicroPython boards will port to the Pico without much trouble. If you're looking for a starting point for your project, we offer many components and component sets in store:   Inland Pi Kit Deluxe Parts Pack Inland PIR Motion Sensor Module 37 in 1 Sensor Kit Elenco Electronics LEDK-80 80 Piece LED Component Kit NTE Electronics LED 3MM Blue Water Clear Lens 1500MCD & 1/8W 220 OHM Resistor – 25 Pack Inland 400 Tie-Points Breadboard – 3 Pack Inland Dupont Jumper Wire 20cm – 3 Pack NTE Electronics 5MM Photoresistor (LDR) – 10 Pack Inland Blue 9G Servo – 3 Pack 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Sign In or Register to comment. Howdy, Stranger! It looks like you're new here. If you want to get involved, click one of these buttons! Sign In with Micro Center Register Sign In with Micro Center Sign In Register Categories 6.3K All Categories 964 The Blog 42 What's Trending 146 How to & Technical Guides 6 Computer Hardware 116 Software 3 Home Office 5 Networking Audio/Visual 1 Home Automation 14 3D Printers 1 Maker 12 PC Build Guides 55 Reviews & Buying Guides 17 Build Showcase 9 Contests 32 Past Contests 401 The Community 1.4K General Discussion 89 New Members 31 Consumer Tech 11 Prebuilt PCs and Laptops 64 Software 2 Audio/Visual 2 Networking & Security Home Automation 2 Digital Photography 3 Content Creators 21 Hobby Boards & Projects 19 3D Printing 43 Retro Arcade/Gaming 73 All Other Tech 1.1K Store Information and Policy 41 Off Topic 2 Community Ideas & Feedback 108 Your Completed Builds 2.5K Build-Your-Own PC 1.6K Help Choosing Parts 205 Graphics Cards 150 CPU's, Memory and Motherboards 57 Cases and Power Supplies 18 Air and Liquid Cooling 10 Monitors and Displays 26 Peripherals 6 All Other Parts 15 Featured Categories We love seeing what our customers build Submit photos and a description of your PC to our build showcase Submit Now Looking for a little inspiration? See other custom PC builds and get some ideas for what can be done View Build Showcase View builds by: AMD Processors Intel Processors RTX 3090 RTX 3080 RTX 2080 Ti RTX 2080 Super RTX 2070 Super RTX 2070 RTX 2060 Super Radeon RX 5700XT Radeon RX 5700 Air Cooled Liquid Cooled SAME DAY CUSTOM BUILD SERVICE If You Can Dream it, We Can Build it. Services starting at $149.99 More Details Micro Center Homepage Desktops Laptops Computer Parts Computer Accessories Custom PC Builder Build Showcase Networking Electronics 3D Printing Service, Upgrades & Repairs Laptop Battery Replacement Laptop Screen Repair Virus and Malware Removal Hard Drive Recovery and Backup Apple MacBook Repair Custom Built PCs Schedule an Appointment © Vanilla Foundation Theme 2021 Powered By Vanilla
Community Article How to manually open the ESET Banking & Payment Protection secured browser - Micro Center Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker {$smarty.capture.menu} Activity Categories Discussions Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker How to manually open the ESET Banking & Payment Protection secured browser - Micro Center Do you have ESET Internet Security or Smart Security Premium and wish to make sure your online shopping or banking is protected? You can easily open up the secured Banking & Payment protection browser, a feature of ESET that will help keep you safe online for these websites. Banking & Payment protection is an additional layer of protection designed to protect your financial data during online transactions. 1. To begin, open the ESET Security software found on your PC. To do this there are two easy ways to get the program open on your PC:  Method 1: Click the Start button, typically found at the lower left corner of the screen, and look for ESET from the list of applications and select it. Then select ESET Security.  Method 2: Go to the hidden icons menu typically found on the lower right hand corner of the Windows taskbar and click on the ESET icon. 2. From the ESET main program window that opens on your PC, click Tools from the menu on the left. 3.  Click on Banking & Payment protection from the Tools screen. 4.  A new browser window will appear. The ESET Banking & Payment protection secured browser will open with a green border surrounding it. 5.  Enter in a website URL of a bank or financial website and the green border will remain indicating it is still within the secured browser. That's it, you can do this for any such website at any time you have a valid ESET subscription. © Vanilla Foundation Theme 2021 Powered By Vanilla Community Article AMD Multipurpose Build - Micro Center Build — Micro Center Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker {$smarty.capture.menu} Activity Categories Discussions Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker Home › Your Completed Builds AMD Multipurpose Build - Micro Center Build System test admin November 2019 edited November 2019 in Your Completed Builds AMD Multipurpose Build - Micro Center Build So this was the first PC I ever built and the main reason behind it was to be able to play games with my friend who is stationed in Japan and only had a PC. I also needed a computer that could run Solidworks simulations easily and not turbo the fans to Read the full story here 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Comments mmiller2 admin November 2019 Love the green! Very cool build 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook ryau ✭✭✭✭✭ November 2019 Nice build! 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook JohnMagee Columbus, Ohio Store Associate June 10 Green is always an mazing choice! Makes me think of green latern! 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Sign In or Register to comment. Howdy, Stranger! It looks like you're new here. If you want to get involved, click one of these buttons! Sign In with Micro Center Register Sign In with Micro Center Sign In Register Categories 6.3K All Categories 964 The Blog 42 What's Trending 146 How to & Technical Guides 6 Computer Hardware 116 Software 3 Home Office 5 Networking Audio/Visual 1 Home Automation 14 3D Printers 1 Maker 12 PC Build Guides 55 Reviews & Buying Guides 17 Build Showcase 9 Contests 32 Past Contests 401 The Community 1.4K General Discussion 89 New Members 31 Consumer Tech 11 Prebuilt PCs and Laptops 64 Software 2 Audio/Visual 2 Networking & Security Home Automation 2 Digital Photography 3 Content Creators 21 Hobby Boards & Projects 19 3D Printing 43 Retro Arcade/Gaming 73 All Other Tech 1.1K Store Information and Policy 41 Off Topic 2 Community Ideas & Feedback 108 Your Completed Builds 2.5K Build-Your-Own PC 1.6K Help Choosing Parts 205 Graphics Cards 150 CPU's, Memory and Motherboards 57 Cases and Power Supplies 18 Air and Liquid Cooling 10 Monitors and Displays 26 Peripherals 6 All Other Parts 15 Featured Categories We love seeing what our customers build Submit photos and a description of your PC to our build showcase Submit Now Looking for a little inspiration? See other custom PC builds and get some ideas for what can be done View Build Showcase View builds by: AMD Processors Intel Processors RTX 3090 RTX 3080 RTX 2080 Ti RTX 2080 Super RTX 2070 Super RTX 2070 RTX 2060 Super Radeon RX 5700XT Radeon RX 5700 Air Cooled Liquid Cooled SAME DAY CUSTOM BUILD SERVICE If You Can Dream it, We Can Build it. Services starting at $149.99 More Details Micro Center Homepage Desktops Laptops Computer Parts Computer Accessories Custom PC Builder Build Showcase Networking Electronics 3D Printing Service, Upgrades & Repairs Laptop Battery Replacement Laptop Screen Repair Virus and Malware Removal Hard Drive Recovery and Backup Apple MacBook Repair Custom Built PCs Schedule an Appointment © Vanilla Foundation Theme 2021 Powered By Vanilla Community Article How to check Volume Level Settings in Windows 10 - Micro Center Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker {$smarty.capture.menu} Activity Categories Discussions Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker How to check Volume Level Settings in Windows 10 - Micro Center Not getting any sound or it is just too quiet on your Windows 10 PC? This article will show you what settings to check if your sound is not working or the volume is too low in Windows 10. Here is how to check those settings: 1.  Right click on the sound icon typically found at the bottom right corner of the screen, then click on Open Sound settings. 2.  In Sound Settings, click on the Sound Control Panel option. 3.  A Sound control panel pop-up window will appear, make sure Playback from the options at the top is selected. 4.  Right click on the default sound device - this will be the device marked with a green check mark in this list, and click on Test. 5.  If the sound is working, you will hear chimes play through the device and the sound equalizer in the window (the green bars on the right) will move up and down during the test. 6.  If the sound is still not working or seems too quiet, Right click again on the default speakers and select Properties. 7.  In the Properties window, click on the Levels tab at the top. There will be a slider to check the level of your speakers on the left. There is also an option to check if the speakers are muted. If you see a speaker icon with a crossed red circle beside it, then the speakers are muted. Click the icon here to unmute. 8.  If needed, test other devices following the same steps listed above. If the wrong device is selected as default and it needs to be changed, right click on the working sound device, and click on Set as default device. Your default device is where any sound will play from your PC. © Vanilla Foundation Theme 2021 Powered By Vanilla Community Article New Razer Blade 15 is Hot! — Micro Center Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker {$smarty.capture.menu} Activity Categories Discussions Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker Home › General Discussion New Razer Blade 15 is Hot! Dulfite ✭ August 2020 in General Discussion I love the computer except for the temperature. When I play a game on it, the thing reaches insane temperatures. I don't want my parts to be damaged from heat (it gets to around 100 degrees when gaming) or my lap to catch on fire. I have used it both on my lap pad as well as over a Targus cooling pad (AWE61) and it heats up regardless. I've read online what various people have done, from Throttlestop, to getting a better fan pad (with 5 fans instead of the two I have on mine), to simply getting a stand to prop it up and allow better airflow. Please give me your solutions, thanks! 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Comments TSPhillipT admin August 2020 Hello @Dulfite Unfortunately, this is just how gaming laptops are, especially the more expensive ones.  You are putting in very good and strong parts inside a very small space.  There are some solutions that other manufacturers are exploring when it comes to cooling gaming laptops however current prototypes are a bit off.   My current favorite solution to this is the new ASUS ProArt and ASUS Mothership (not released).  The ProArt is a studio laptop however it is based off the Mothership.  The concept is that all the hardware and cooling are on the lid so that it is facing the air and not facing the desk.   My recommendations for mitigating heat from the laptop 1.) Lower the ambient temperature in the room if possible 2.) Use a stand or cooling pad to allow a lot of extra space for air intake from the bottom of the laptop 3.) Underclocking the processor/GPU.  This will lower performance but will also lower the heat 4.) Avoid using it on your lap   0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Dulfite ✭ August 2020 edited August 2020 TSPhillipT said: Hello @Dulfite Unfortunately, this is just how gaming laptops are, especially the more expensive ones.  You are putting in very good and strong parts inside a very small space.  There are some solutions that other manufacturers are exploring when it comes to cooling gaming laptops however current prototypes are a bit off.   My current favorite solution to this is the new ASUS ProArt and ASUS Mothership (not released).  The ProArt is a studio laptop however it is based off the Mothership.  The concept is that all the hardware and cooling are on the lid so that it is facing the air and not facing the desk.   My recommendations for mitigating heat from the laptop 1.) Lower the ambient temperature in the room if possible 2.) Use a stand or cooling pad to allow a lot of extra space for air intake from the bottom of the laptop 3.) Underclocking the processor/GPU.  This will lower performance but will also lower the heat 4.) Avoid using it on your lap   @TSPhillipT Thanks for the advice! Regarding your points: 1) Room temperature is generally set at 75, sometimes 73, I'm a married man and can't really get away with anything cooler than that. What is the optimal temperature recommended? Would a ceiling fan directly over me and the laptop more so impact this positively? 2) As I mentioned, I have a cooling bad and a separate Targus cooling fan that goes under the laptop. When I put the laptop directly on either of those it still runs hot. That fan pad worked wonders on my Acer (which uses a gtx950m), but it isn't helping with this computer. Is there a recommended cooling pad/fan that works best? I tried propping up the computer with something in order to allow more airflow, but that did nothing to resolve the heat when I was playing a game. 3) How do you do this? With Throttlestop? 4) I only use it directly on my lap when I'm doing non gaming things, but there is absolutely no heat problem during those times so far. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook TSTonyV admin August 2020 I'm pretty sure the 10th gen Intel CPUs should be throttling at 90C so if you're hitting 100 then something is probably wrong. If the cooling pad isn't helping you at all, then there's a few possibilities for why: The cooling in the computer is just poorly designed Something is not working properly/defective Your fans for some reason aren't set to their max speeds when under heavy load.  Are you specifically making sure that your have your fans set to max speed when gaming? They may not automatically go to 100%, some laptops will only go up to something like 70% then you have to press a button or enable a settings to actually get max speeds. Undervolting your CPU would be done via BIOS and changing the voltage settings, for your GPU you can use MSI Afterburner to do it. I personally haven't undervolted so I can't really offer any advice there. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Dulfite ✭ August 2020 Okay so I manually put my fan on 100% when I play games and that has decreased it significantly. With the fan on I don't think it went over 80, let alone near 100. Hopefully this is the fix for any game. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook TSTonyV admin August 2020 Yep, that sounds about right. A temp decrease like that should drastically reduce thermal throttling and improve performance.  0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Sign In or Register to comment. Howdy, Stranger! It looks like you're new here. If you want to get involved, click one of these buttons! Sign In with Micro Center Register Sign In with Micro Center Sign In Register Categories 6.3K All Categories 964 The Blog 42 What's Trending 146 How to & Technical Guides 6 Computer Hardware 116 Software 3 Home Office 5 Networking Audio/Visual 1 Home Automation 14 3D Printers 1 Maker 12 PC Build Guides 55 Reviews & Buying Guides 17 Build Showcase 9 Contests 32 Past Contests 401 The Community 1.4K General Discussion 89 New Members 31 Consumer Tech 11 Prebuilt PCs and Laptops 64 Software 2 Audio/Visual 2 Networking & Security Home Automation 2 Digital Photography 3 Content Creators 21 Hobby Boards & Projects 19 3D Printing 43 Retro Arcade/Gaming 73 All Other Tech 1.1K Store Information and Policy 41 Off Topic 2 Community Ideas & Feedback 108 Your Completed Builds 2.5K Build-Your-Own PC 1.6K Help Choosing Parts 205 Graphics Cards 150 CPU's, Memory and Motherboards 57 Cases and Power Supplies 18 Air and Liquid Cooling 10 Monitors and Displays 26 Peripherals 6 All Other Parts 15 Featured Categories We love seeing what our customers build Submit photos and a description of your PC to our build showcase Submit Now Looking for a little inspiration? See other custom PC builds and get some ideas for what can be done View Build Showcase View builds by: AMD Processors Intel Processors RTX 3090 RTX 3080 RTX 2080 Ti RTX 2080 Super RTX 2070 Super RTX 2070 RTX 2060 Super Radeon RX 5700XT Radeon RX 5700 Air Cooled Liquid Cooled SAME DAY CUSTOM BUILD SERVICE If You Can Dream it, We Can Build it. Services starting at $149.99 More Details Micro Center Homepage Desktops Laptops Computer Parts Computer Accessories Custom PC Builder Build Showcase Networking Electronics 3D Printing Service, Upgrades & Repairs Laptop Battery Replacement Laptop Screen Repair Virus and Malware Removal Hard Drive Recovery and Backup Apple MacBook Repair Custom Built PCs Schedule an Appointment © Vanilla Foundation Theme 2021 Powered By Vanilla Community Article Anatomy of RAM for Desktop Computers - Micro Center Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker {$smarty.capture.menu} Activity Categories Discussions Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker Anatomy of RAM for Desktop Computers - Micro Center The acronym RAM refers to Random Access Memory. RAM provides the essential function of holding all the data that a computer is actively using. In this context, RAM is considered volatile, meaning that when the computer loses power, whether due to a normal shutdown or some type of power failure, whatever is stored in the RAM at that time disappears. Also in this context, RAM can be used over and over for the long term. Finally, in this context RAM is for temporary storage while you are actively using the computer - compared to non-volatile memory which is used for things like Solid State Drives and USB Flash Drives. The non-volatile memory in those type of devices allows you to write and save the information to the memory until you specifically delete or overwrite the information, even when they do not have power to them. This document is primarily about RAM used as temporary storage for a computer. While some mobile devices have memory that is soldered to the motherboard, the modules used in desktop computer builds look like these: The first image shows a basic memory module. This is what you would see if you opened up a regular pre-built computer from Dell or HP. The second image shows a RAM module with a heat spreader, which is a passive heatsink that helps cool the RAM. The third image shows RGB enabled RAM. While RGB components can be used in any system, they allow control of the lighting color when installed in compatible systems. As it’s naming convention states, DDR4 is the fourth iteration of this form of memory. Below are their predecessors DDR3 and DDR2. DDR3 Desktop Memory Module: DDR2 Desktop Memory Module: The main difference in these modules is not that noticeable at first. While they all share the same dimensions, there are two key difference between each iteration. The first of which the amount of copper contacts, or pins, the module has. The other is where the notch in the module is located, this is used to stop each type from mistakenly being inserted into newer or older boards. More to the point, it is to stop the contacts from being damaged. You can see the contacts and notch on a DDR4 modules below. Outside of physical differences, most modules will come with a sticker containing information about it. What is listed may vary from one manufacturer to another, but the key information will be the type (DDR#) along with possibly a part number, and the manufacturer information. Below you’ll see that on the module we’ve been using for most of our pictures, this one is a Crucial DDR4 module. Finally we have the points where the slot clips hold the memory in place. These have remained the same for the majority of modules, but the slots have recently gone from top and bottom lever clips to a single clip, with the other side working more like a wedge. While this document focuses on desktop RAM, the principles are the same for laptop RAM modules. In general, the main difference in desktop RAM vs. laptop RAM is the size of the board and the number of pins. The concepts of notches, pin connections, voltage, and other items are similar though not exactly the same. © Vanilla Foundation Theme 2021 Powered By Vanilla Community Article Keyboard Buying Guide: Mechanical Or Membrane? — Micro Center Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker {$smarty.capture.menu} Activity Categories Discussions Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker Home › Reviews & Buying Guides Keyboard Buying Guide: Mechanical Or Membrane? SeanM admin January 29 edited February 1 in Reviews & Buying Guides Virtually everybody uses a keyboard on a daily basis, be it the built-in set of keys on a laptop or a separate one that’s connected to a desktop PC. Many of us don’t pay that much thought to these ubiquitous peripherals, but if you’re finding that your cheap keyboard isn’t cutting it any longer and it’s time for an upgrade, we’re here to help. In this guide, we lay out the differences between membrane and mechanical keyboards, compare the most common mechanical switch types, and bring you up to speed with everything else you need to know before you buy. The Redragon K556-RK (Brown Switches)  What is the difference between membrane and mechanical keyboards? Keyboards are generally broken down into two broad categories: Membrane keyboards and mechanical keyboards. These terms refer to the way in which the keys interface with the keyboard’s circuit board, which reads your key presses and sends the inputs to your computer. Membrane keyboards are more common today due to their simplicity and low cost of manufacturing. On a membrane keyboard, the keys sit on a rubber overlay – the namesake membrane – which then sits on the circuit board. When you press a key, it pushes on the membrane and registers a keystroke. The advantages of membrane keyboards are that they’re simple, quiet, and cheap to make. The drawbacks of membrane keyboards are that they are considerably less precise than mechanical keyboards (that is, keystrokes may not always register quickly or accurately) and typically do not provide the pleasant tactile feedback that many typists and gamers prefer. Some membrane keyboards may even start to feel “mushy” after a while. Inland iC100 Keyboard & Mouse Combo (Membrane) Enter mechanical keyboards: Instead of a one-piece rubber membrane that registers keystrokes when keys are pressed, mechanical keyboards assign individual switches to every single key. This keyboard design is naturally more complex (and therefore more expensive to produce), but in decades past, mechanical switches were the norm. If you used computers in the ‘80s or ‘90s, for instance, then you’ve almost certainly typed on a mechanical keyboard before, maybe without even realizing it. Perhaps you actually remember how good those old keyboards felt (or how clicky, heavy, and noisy they could be) and wonder why keyboards today don’t feel quite the same. Now you know. Mechanical keyboards are greatly preferred by people who do a lot of typing, such as writers, as well as gamers who demand more comfort and precision from their PC accessories than most users (I include myself among both groups). Thankfully, mechanical keyboard switches never completely disappeared, and the internet has allowed for something of a renaissance in mechanical keyboard design in recent years. In fact, you’ve now got more choices than ever when shopping around for a mechanical keyboard – wired, wireless, full-size, compact, you name it – and that’s before you even start looking at the sprawling number of different keyboard makers, switch types, and switch manufacturers out there. Now that you’ve got the basics down, though, we can dive deeper down the rabbit hole of switch types and their characteristics. Logitech G G513 (GX Red, Linear)  What is the difference between mechanical keyboard switches? Although most mechanical keyboards from decades past (such as the iconic IBM Model M) utilized a switch design known as a “buckling spring,” modern mechanical keyboards are a bit different. The vast majority of today’s mechanical keyboards feature Cherry MX switches, which remain the gold standard, or their off-brand derivatives. These non-Cherry MX keyboard switches are generally referred to as “Cherry clones,” which is not necessarily a term of derision as several of today’s off-brand switch makers are well regarded by mechanical keyboard users. Gateron, Kailh, and Outemu are three popular “Cherry clone” brands and you’ll often see these switches on competitively priced keyboards. Of these, Gateron is arguably the most highly rated, with many users claiming that these keyboard switches are even slightly smoother than Cherry MX in some cases. Switches of this style, whether Cherry MX or clones, are categorized by colors which are typically equivalent between makers (e.g. a Gateron brown keyboard switch is roughly the same as a Cherry MX brown switch). There are quite a few to choose from today but the most common are red, brown, blue, and green, and those are the ones we recommend you stick with unless you are already familiar with mechanical keyboards and have more specific needs. These colors designate the typing characteristics of a particular keyboard switch. These include actuation weight, or the amount of force needed to depress the switch enough to register a keystroke; tactile feedback, or whether the keypress is tactile or linear; and noise level, or whether the keys are relatively quiet or “clicky” and loud when pressed. SteelSeries Apex 7 (Blue Switch) “Tactile” and “linear” are terms you’ll see a lot when looking at mechanical keyboard switches, and refer to the physical sensation of each keypress. A tactile switch has a soft “bump” which you will feel when you press the key down to the actuation point (hence the switch’s “tactile” namesake). A linear keyboard switch is non-tactile, meaning that the keystroke will be totally smooth with no tactile bump. The choice between tactile and linear keyboard switches boils down to preference. Both have their advantages: Gamers, for instance, might prefer a linear switch, as the smooth keystroke makes quick, successive key presses (such as double-taps) slightly faster. On the other hand, many typists enjoy the physical feedback of tactile switches. You may want to test out both if you get a chance to see which style you prefer before buying. As far as the most common types go, Cherry MX red keyboard switches, such as those found on the Corsair K70, are linear, quiet switches with a medium actuation force of 45 centinewtons (cN). Cherry MX brown switch keyboards are similar, but these keys are tactile with an actuation force of 55cN. These are two are very popular and well-rounded switches for common typing tasks like writing and gaming, and they’re a good place to start if you’re new to mechanical keyboards. I personally use a Gateron brown switch keyboard for both writing and gaming and find that it fits this middle ground very well. Corsair K70 RBG MK.2 (Cherry MX Red) Cherry MX blue switch keyboards are both tactile and clicky, meaning that you will not only feel but also hear the tactile bump during each keystroke. These switches feature a heavier actuation force of 60cN as well. Cherry MX green switch keyboards (and clones from brands like Razer) are tactile, clicky, and even heavier still, with an 80cN actuation force – if you’ve never used green switches before or you have a light touch while typing, you might find your fingers actually feeling slightly sore after using these for awhile.  What are the noise levels of various switches? Mechanical keyboard switches are generally noisier than their non-mechanical counterparts, but there are audible differences between switch types. Aside from terms like “tactile” and “linear,” you’ll see switches described as “clicky” and “non-clicky.” These admittedly aren’t the most technical terms, but they’re fairly straightforward in that they refer to the noise output of each keystroke. Red and brown switch keyboards are non-clicky, and so are a bit quieter than blue and green switch keyboards (red being the quietest mechanical keyboard switches of these four popular switch types due to their linear, non-tactile operation). People immediately around you will hear you typing, and you will hear yourself typing, but not to the point of being disruptive. Clicky blue and green switch keyboards, on the other hand, are somewhat notorious for the amount of noise they create. This makes them less than ideal for office environments, which might be a problem for some as these switches are often favored by those who do a lot of writing, data entry, and other precise typing-heavy tasks. This is something to bear in mind if you’re going to be using your mechanical keyboard in a shared environment. Razer BlackWidow V3 (Green Switch) 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Comments Paul_2 ✭ February 1 SeanM said: What is the difference between membrane and mechanical keyboards? Hurt feelings, from angry roommates or partners complaining about the noise of your favorite mechanical keyboard! 2 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook AlexS admin February 2 Paul_2 said: SeanM said: What is the difference between membrane and mechanical keyboards? Hurt feelings, from angry roommates or partners complaining about the noise of your favorite mechanical keyboard! They're hurt because they don't have a mechanical keyboard. They're angry because they're jelly that your keyboard is superior to theirs. Partners complain because it's not their own. (:< 2 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Leave a Comment Rich Text Editor. To edit a paragraph's style, hit tab to get to the paragraph menu. From there you will be able to pick one style. Nothing defaults to paragraph. An inline formatting menu will show up when you select text. Hit tab to get into that menu. Some elements, such as rich link embeds, images, loading indicators, and error messages may get inserted into the editor. You may navigate to these using the arrow keys inside of the editor and delete them with the delete or backspace key. Comment As ... Howdy, Stranger! It looks like you're new here. If you want to get involved, click one of these buttons! Sign In with Micro Center Register Sign In with Micro Center Sign In Register Categories 6.3K All Categories 964 The Blog 42 What's Trending 146 How to & Technical Guides 6 Computer Hardware 116 Software 3 Home Office 5 Networking Audio/Visual 1 Home Automation 14 3D Printers 1 Maker 12 PC Build Guides 55 Reviews & Buying Guides 17 Build Showcase 9 Contests 32 Past Contests 401 The Community 1.4K General Discussion 89 New Members 31 Consumer Tech 11 Prebuilt PCs and Laptops 64 Software 2 Audio/Visual 2 Networking & Security Home Automation 2 Digital Photography 3 Content Creators 21 Hobby Boards & Projects 19 3D Printing 43 Retro Arcade/Gaming 73 All Other Tech 1.1K Store Information and Policy 41 Off Topic 2 Community Ideas & Feedback 108 Your Completed Builds 2.5K Build-Your-Own PC 1.6K Help Choosing Parts 205 Graphics Cards 150 CPU's, Memory and Motherboards 57 Cases and Power Supplies 18 Air and Liquid Cooling 10 Monitors and Displays 26 Peripherals 6 All Other Parts 15 Featured Categories We love seeing what our customers build Submit photos and a description of your PC to our build showcase Submit Now Looking for a little inspiration? See other custom PC builds and get some ideas for what can be done View Build Showcase View builds by: AMD Processors Intel Processors RTX 3090 RTX 3080 RTX 2080 Ti RTX 2080 Super RTX 2070 Super RTX 2070 RTX 2060 Super Radeon RX 5700XT Radeon RX 5700 Air Cooled Liquid Cooled SAME DAY CUSTOM BUILD SERVICE If You Can Dream it, We Can Build it. Services starting at $149.99 More Details Micro Center Homepage Desktops Laptops Computer Parts Computer Accessories Custom PC Builder Build Showcase Networking Electronics 3D Printing Service, Upgrades & Repairs Laptop Battery Replacement Laptop Screen Repair Virus and Malware Removal Hard Drive Recovery and Backup Apple MacBook Repair Custom Built PCs Schedule an Appointment © Vanilla Foundation Theme 2021 Powered By Vanilla Community Article Computer Case Buying Guide — Micro Center Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker {$smarty.capture.menu} Activity Categories Discussions Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker Home › Reviews & Buying Guides Computer Case Buying Guide SeanM admin February 22 edited March 5 in Reviews & Buying Guides By Lucas Coll The computer case is essentially the “body” of your PC build (the internal components being the “organs,” so to speak), and as the framework that holds everything together, it’s vital that you choose the right one. If you’re new to the PC building scene, however, concepts like cable management, case sizes, and motherboard compatibility can be intimidating, and the fact that buying the wrong one will make the entire build process much more difficult doesn’t make things any less daunting. Worry not: Once you nail a few important concepts down, choosing the right computer case for your build is pretty straightforward. You’ve got a lot of options available to you – enough to easily induce decision paralysis – but understanding the different features and design principles will help you narrow things down so you can find the perfect case that will make your build much, much easier. To make things even simpler we’ve put together this handy computer case buying guide that covers all the basics. What PC Cases are Best for Cable Management? Aside from size, cable management is easily one of the most important features of a computer case. Poor cable management can make your building process a nightmare and could potentially hinder your hardware’s performance. On the other hand, a case with thoughtfully designed cable management features will make the build much easier and, dare we say, even fun. The case is what contains all of your hardware components, and all of those components must interface with the motherboard (and with each other) via cables. Good cable management primarily depends on two things: routing, or the availability of channels where the cables can pass through, and space for the cables themselves to sit comfortably without crowding the case. Cable clutter can block airflow and make it difficult for the builder to properly install and organize internal components. Depending on size and form factor, computer cases typically have allotted space behind the motherboard tray (if you’re looking at the case from the rear, this would be on the left side of the interior of the case). Here, you can rout cables behind and away from the case’s main compartment. Full ATX towers and many ATX mid-towers like the Cooler Master NR600 MasterBox also have a semi-enclosed compartment at the bottom, referred to as the “basement,” where the power supply sits, and there should be some room down here for tucking away unused cables as well. This is especially important if you’re using a non-modular PSU. Cable management is more than a simple matter of aesthetics: It’s also important for ventilation and airflow, as cables clogging up the case interior can and will affect thermal performance. The best way to determine a case’s cable management capabilities is to look closely at the provided pictures and to read customer reviews and build guides that feature that particular case. A relevant build tip: Plan your cable management before you start assembling everything, not after. Zip ties are also a cheap and easy way to help keep everything tidy. What’s the difference between Micro ATX, Mini ITX, & Full ATX Cases? Cases are categorized by motherboard size, your main options being ATX (the most common), Micro ATX, and Mini ITX. Among these, each motherboard type has multiple tower sizes available for it – mini, mid-, full, etc. As the housing for your components, the case is naturally built and sized with those internal parts in mind, all of which interface with the motherboard which is itself anchored inside the case. As the case and motherboard combo create the baseline for your build, it makes sense that tower size is categorized this way. This is all to say that you’ll need to decide on a motherboard (or at least, a motherboard form factor) before buying a case to make sure the case is compatible with the rest of your build. ATX is the most popular and versatile, especially for a gaming PC case that will have a bulky and hot GPU sitting inside of it. Micro ATX and Mini ITX motherboards, and cases like the Thermaltake Core V21 mini tower, are typically reserved for compact enthusiast PCs by more experienced builders. Your choice of case size boils down to more than simply how much space you have available for your PC tower. Larger cases may be bulkier, but if you have the room for it, they are almost always easier to work with (that is, you have more physical working room inside the case), offer easier cable management, and allow for more ventilation and superior thermal performance than smaller cases. Full towers and mid-towers are the most popular, and if space is a concern, ATX mid-towers are an excellent sweet spot. If this is your first-time building, we generally don’t recommend going smaller than a good mid-tower, and there are a ton of great options in this size bracket. Do windows add anything beyond style? You’ll see a lot of computer cases that have a window on one side (usually the right side when facing the case from the rear) that lets you see into the case. This is mostly an aesthetic choice, as it allows the builder to show off their components and create a custom ambiance with components, such as cooling fans, that feature RGB LED lighting. Windows can serve a functional purpose as well, however. Being able to see into the case without opening it up has clear advantages (LED light shows aside), and these glass or plastic panels are sometimes simpler to open than a traditional side panel, allowing easier access to the tower’s internals. Some case designs even feature a hinge that lets the window swing open without having to be completely removed. Others, like the popular Lian Li Lancool II full tower, have swing-out windows on both sides of the case. One important consideration regarding see-through side panels is that if you opt to go for one, you’ll have to choose between tempered glass and plastic/acrylic. Plastic is more durable – glass can obviously crack or break – but will also show scratches much more easily, which is why builders generally favor tempered glass over acrylic. Glass-paneled cases are also typically found among higher-end towers. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Leave a Comment Rich Text Editor. To edit a paragraph's style, hit tab to get to the paragraph menu. From there you will be able to pick one style. Nothing defaults to paragraph. An inline formatting menu will show up when you select text. Hit tab to get into that menu. Some elements, such as rich link embeds, images, loading indicators, and error messages may get inserted into the editor. You may navigate to these using the arrow keys inside of the editor and delete them with the delete or backspace key. Comment As ... Howdy, Stranger! It looks like you're new here. If you want to get involved, click one of these buttons! Sign In with Micro Center Register Sign In with Micro Center Sign In Register Categories 6.3K All Categories 964 The Blog 42 What's Trending 146 How to & Technical Guides 6 Computer Hardware 116 Software 3 Home Office 5 Networking Audio/Visual 1 Home Automation 14 3D Printers 1 Maker 12 PC Build Guides 55 Reviews & Buying Guides 17 Build Showcase 9 Contests 32 Past Contests 402 The Community 1.4K General Discussion 89 New Members 31 Consumer Tech 11 Prebuilt PCs and Laptops 64 Software 2 Audio/Visual 2 Networking & Security Home Automation 2 Digital Photography 3 Content Creators 21 Hobby Boards & Projects 19 3D Printing 43 Retro Arcade/Gaming 73 All Other Tech 1.1K Store Information and Policy 41 Off Topic 2 Community Ideas & Feedback 108 Your Completed Builds 2.5K Build-Your-Own PC 1.6K Help Choosing Parts 205 Graphics Cards 150 CPU's, Memory and Motherboards 57 Cases and Power Supplies 18 Air and Liquid Cooling 10 Monitors and Displays 26 Peripherals 6 All Other Parts 15 Featured Categories We love seeing what our customers build Submit photos and a description of your PC to our build showcase Submit Now Looking for a little inspiration? See other custom PC builds and get some ideas for what can be done View Build Showcase View builds by: AMD Processors Intel Processors RTX 3090 RTX 3080 RTX 2080 Ti RTX 2080 Super RTX 2070 Super RTX 2070 RTX 2060 Super Radeon RX 5700XT Radeon RX 5700 Air Cooled Liquid Cooled SAME DAY CUSTOM BUILD SERVICE If You Can Dream it, We Can Build it. Services starting at $149.99 More Details Micro Center Homepage Desktops Laptops Computer Parts Computer Accessories Custom PC Builder Build Showcase Networking Electronics 3D Printing Service, Upgrades & Repairs Laptop Battery Replacement Laptop Screen Repair Virus and Malware Removal Hard Drive Recovery and Backup Apple MacBook Repair Custom Built PCs Schedule an Appointment © Vanilla Foundation Theme 2021 Powered By Vanilla Community Article LED Lights Stopped Working — Micro Center Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker {$smarty.capture.menu} Activity Categories Discussions Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker Home › General Discussion LED Lights Stopped Working Liirrili ✭ March 2020 in General Discussion I bought this computer a few weeks ago, https://www.microcenter.com/product/610246/cyberpowerpc-gamer-supreme-liquid-cool-gaming-computer It has worked perfectly until today.  The very bottom LED fan is still normal but the other three and the lights on the cooler are only showing red/orange and green. Earlier it resolved after pushing the button on top to change the colors but now it will only show those few colors no matter what I do.  The only way I know of to change the colors is with the button on the top of the tower.  The computer has not been moved since I set it up so I don't think anything could have come loose.  I am not knowledgeable enough to go poking around without some guidance so any suggestions or possible solutions would be greatly appreciated.  Thanks 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Comments TSMichaelB admin April 2020 Liirrili said: I bought this computer a few weeks ago, https://www.microcenter.com/product/610246/cyberpowerpc-gamer-supreme-liquid-cool-gaming-computer It has worked perfectly until today.  The very bottom LED fan is still normal but the other three and the lights on the cooler are only showing red/orange and green. Earlier it resolved after pushing the button on top to change the colors but now it will only show those few colors no matter what I do.  The only way I know of to change the colors is with the button on the top of the tower.  The computer has not been moved since I set it up so I don't think anything could have come loose.  I am not knowledgeable enough to go poking around without some guidance so any suggestions or possible solutions would be greatly appreciated.  Thanks Welcome to the forum, Liirrili. I am sorry to hear you are having issues with your CyberPowerPC's RGB LED's. In these configurations, it's typical for the fans to be plugged into either an RGB controller or a daisy chain splitter and connected to either the motherboard, or a third party controller. Since you are able to control the LED's with the press of a button on the chassis, I believe they are using a controller or splitter and plugging into a daughterboard of some kind on the chassis, perhaps behind the rear motherboard tray. Your description of the issue leads me to believe that the RGB connector isn't fully seated, or the controllers pin that is designated for the blue hues of color is defective. Since you can access the red and green color spectrum, I would start by tracing the RGB cables from the fans to their destination, making sure each is firmly seated to their respective connectors and tracing their connections to the source of the RGB controller, making sure once again that everything is firmly seated. If you would like to remove the side panel and provide pictures, we can try to offer additional assistance as to where they may be located. If you are not comfortable doing so, our service team can assist in-store. Lastly, if you would like to utilize your warranty through CyberPowerPC, you certainly have the ability to do so, however I would recommend the other options first as an RMA may take the longest for a resolution.  Please let us know how you'd like to proceed, and we'll do our best to assist from there! 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Sign In or Register to comment. Howdy, Stranger! It looks like you're new here. If you want to get involved, click one of these buttons! Sign In with Micro Center Register Sign In with Micro Center Sign In Register Categories 6.3K All Categories 964 The Blog 42 What's Trending 146 How to & Technical Guides 6 Computer Hardware 116 Software 3 Home Office 5 Networking Audio/Visual 1 Home Automation 14 3D Printers 1 Maker 12 PC Build Guides 55 Reviews & Buying Guides 17 Build Showcase 9 Contests 32 Past Contests 402 The Community 1.4K General Discussion 89 New Members 31 Consumer Tech 11 Prebuilt PCs and Laptops 64 Software 2 Audio/Visual 2 Networking & Security Home Automation 2 Digital Photography 3 Content Creators 21 Hobby Boards & Projects 19 3D Printing 43 Retro Arcade/Gaming 73 All Other Tech 1.1K Store Information and Policy 41 Off Topic 2 Community Ideas & Feedback 108 Your Completed Builds 2.5K Build-Your-Own PC 1.6K Help Choosing Parts 205 Graphics Cards 150 CPU's, Memory and Motherboards 57 Cases and Power Supplies 18 Air and Liquid Cooling 10 Monitors and Displays 26 Peripherals 6 All Other Parts 15 Featured Categories We love seeing what our customers build Submit photos and a description of your PC to our build showcase Submit Now Looking for a little inspiration? See other custom PC builds and get some ideas for what can be done View Build Showcase View builds by: AMD Processors Intel Processors RTX 3090 RTX 3080 RTX 2080 Ti RTX 2080 Super RTX 2070 Super RTX 2070 RTX 2060 Super Radeon RX 5700XT Radeon RX 5700 Air Cooled Liquid Cooled SAME DAY CUSTOM BUILD SERVICE If You Can Dream it, We Can Build it. Services starting at $149.99 More Details Micro Center Homepage Desktops Laptops Computer Parts Computer Accessories Custom PC Builder Build Showcase Networking Electronics 3D Printing Service, Upgrades & Repairs Laptop Battery Replacement Laptop Screen Repair Virus and Malware Removal Hard Drive Recovery and Backup Apple MacBook Repair Custom Built PCs Schedule an Appointment © Vanilla Foundation Theme 2021 Powered By Vanilla Community Article Difference between 8 core and 10 core — Micro Center Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker {$smarty.capture.menu} Activity Categories Discussions Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker Home › Help Choosing Parts Difference between 8 core and 10 core Geo ✭ November 2020 in Help Choosing Parts I love technology but don't really have any one in my life who has in depth knowledge of things, so I don't know some times if a sale is worth it or if i should just get a better part. What is the difference between and 8 core and 10 core processor? Is it substantial enough that I should just get a 10 core? 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Comments LandShark admin November 2020 Hey @Geo CPU cores are individual nodes of a CPU that allow it to process tasks. So, more cores = more multitasking. Here's a Techquickie video that does a great job explaining the difference : How Do CPUs Use Multiple Cores? The video is growing a bit outdated at this point but the base concept holds true. Modern titles have made improvements to take advantage of more CPU cores and threads. I'd also recommend checking out our How to Choose Your Parts Processor Guide for our recommendation on what CPU to buy! 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Sign In or Register to comment. Howdy, Stranger! It looks like you're new here. If you want to get involved, click one of these buttons! Sign In with Micro Center Register Sign In with Micro Center Sign In Register Categories 6.3K All Categories 964 The Blog 42 What's Trending 146 How to & Technical Guides 6 Computer Hardware 116 Software 3 Home Office 5 Networking Audio/Visual 1 Home Automation 14 3D Printers 1 Maker 12 PC Build Guides 55 Reviews & Buying Guides 17 Build Showcase 9 Contests 32 Past Contests 401 The Community 1.4K General Discussion 89 New Members 31 Consumer Tech 11 Prebuilt PCs and Laptops 64 Software 2 Audio/Visual 2 Networking & Security Home Automation 2 Digital Photography 3 Content Creators 21 Hobby Boards & Projects 19 3D Printing 43 Retro Arcade/Gaming 73 All Other Tech 1.1K Store Information and Policy 41 Off Topic 2 Community Ideas & Feedback 108 Your Completed Builds 2.5K Build-Your-Own PC 1.6K Help Choosing Parts 205 Graphics Cards 150 CPU's, Memory and Motherboards 57 Cases and Power Supplies 18 Air and Liquid Cooling 10 Monitors and Displays 26 Peripherals 6 All Other Parts 15 Featured Categories We love seeing what our customers build Submit photos and a description of your PC to our build showcase Submit Now Looking for a little inspiration? See other custom PC builds and get some ideas for what can be done View Build Showcase View builds by: AMD Processors Intel Processors RTX 3090 RTX 3080 RTX 2080 Ti RTX 2080 Super RTX 2070 Super RTX 2070 RTX 2060 Super Radeon RX 5700XT Radeon RX 5700 Air Cooled Liquid Cooled SAME DAY CUSTOM BUILD SERVICE If You Can Dream it, We Can Build it. Services starting at $149.99 More Details Micro Center Homepage Desktops Laptops Computer Parts Computer Accessories Custom PC Builder Build Showcase Networking Electronics 3D Printing Service, Upgrades & Repairs Laptop Battery Replacement Laptop Screen Repair Virus and Malware Removal Hard Drive Recovery and Backup Apple MacBook Repair Custom Built PCs Schedule an Appointment © Vanilla Foundation Theme 2021 Powered By Vanilla Community Article Geisha - Micro Center Build — Micro Center Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker {$smarty.capture.menu} Activity Categories Discussions Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker Home › Your Completed Builds Geisha - Micro Center Build System test admin September 2020 edited September 2020 in Your Completed Builds Geisha - Micro Center Build This was my first gaming pc! I built it on a whim because I was tired of in-game lag and friends complaining about my unreliability when I was playing on a Mac. Originally, I was just going to buy one but decided two-day shipping was two days too Read the full story here 1 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Comments LandShark admin September 2020 This is amazing! The little figurine really pulls the concept together! You should post it in our Streaming Must have contest https://community.microcenter.com/discussion/4484/streaming-must-haves-contest-enter-for-your-chance-to-win-a-200-gift-card 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Enamelized Va ✭ September 2020 Congratulations on your first build!!! It looks really good and clean. The geisha figure is a nice touch and can easily be seen against the white. Thanks for sharing 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Sign In or Register to comment. Howdy, Stranger! It looks like you're new here. If you want to get involved, click one of these buttons! Sign In with Micro Center Register Sign In with Micro Center Sign In Register Categories 6.3K All Categories 964 The Blog 42 What's Trending 146 How to & Technical Guides 6 Computer Hardware 116 Software 3 Home Office 5 Networking Audio/Visual 1 Home Automation 14 3D Printers 1 Maker 12 PC Build Guides 55 Reviews & Buying Guides 17 Build Showcase 9 Contests 32 Past Contests 402 The Community 1.4K General Discussion 89 New Members 31 Consumer Tech 11 Prebuilt PCs and Laptops 64 Software 2 Audio/Visual 2 Networking & Security Home Automation 2 Digital Photography 3 Content Creators 21 Hobby Boards & Projects 19 3D Printing 43 Retro Arcade/Gaming 73 All Other Tech 1.1K Store Information and Policy 41 Off Topic 2 Community Ideas & Feedback 108 Your Completed Builds 2.5K Build-Your-Own PC 1.6K Help Choosing Parts 205 Graphics Cards 150 CPU's, Memory and Motherboards 57 Cases and Power Supplies 18 Air and Liquid Cooling 10 Monitors and Displays 26 Peripherals 6 All Other Parts 15 Featured Categories We love seeing what our customers build Submit photos and a description of your PC to our build showcase Submit Now Looking for a little inspiration? See other custom PC builds and get some ideas for what can be done View Build Showcase View builds by: AMD Processors Intel Processors RTX 3090 RTX 3080 RTX 2080 Ti RTX 2080 Super RTX 2070 Super RTX 2070 RTX 2060 Super Radeon RX 5700XT Radeon RX 5700 Air Cooled Liquid Cooled SAME DAY CUSTOM BUILD SERVICE If You Can Dream it, We Can Build it. Services starting at $149.99 More Details Micro Center Homepage Desktops Laptops Computer Parts Computer Accessories Custom PC Builder Build Showcase Networking Electronics 3D Printing Service, Upgrades & Repairs Laptop Battery Replacement Laptop Screen Repair Virus and Malware Removal Hard Drive Recovery and Backup Apple MacBook Repair Custom Built PCs Schedule an Appointment © Vanilla Foundation Theme 2021 Powered By Vanilla Community Article Chernobyl - Micro Center Build — Micro Center Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker {$smarty.capture.menu} Activity Categories Discussions Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker Home › Your Completed Builds Chernobyl - Micro Center Build System test admin March 22 edited March 22 in Your Completed Builds Chernobyl - Micro Center Build Love white and green together, and green is my fav color, play any FPS such as CoD, CS, Overwatch, play single player games like mass effect, cyberpunk,witcher, crysis, some mobas. Alot of other games. Future upgrade will be a GPU but gl with that now. Read the full story here 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Comments SeanM admin March 22 Great build! But don't forget, if you'd like to enter the #MicroCenterMadness contest to win one of two Micro Center prize packs, you need to include #MicroCenterMadness in the build title. But you can still enter - just hit the enter button and add #MicroCenterMadness to your build title! 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Sign In or Register to comment. Howdy, Stranger! It looks like you're new here. If you want to get involved, click one of these buttons! Sign In with Micro Center Register Sign In with Micro Center Sign In Register Categories 6.3K All Categories 964 The Blog 42 What's Trending 146 How to & Technical Guides 6 Computer Hardware 116 Software 3 Home Office 5 Networking Audio/Visual 1 Home Automation 14 3D Printers 1 Maker 12 PC Build Guides 55 Reviews & Buying Guides 17 Build Showcase 9 Contests 32 Past Contests 401 The Community 1.4K General Discussion 89 New Members 31 Consumer Tech 11 Prebuilt PCs and Laptops 64 Software 2 Audio/Visual 2 Networking & Security Home Automation 2 Digital Photography 3 Content Creators 21 Hobby Boards & Projects 19 3D Printing 43 Retro Arcade/Gaming 73 All Other Tech 1.1K Store Information and Policy 41 Off Topic 2 Community Ideas & Feedback 108 Your Completed Builds 2.5K Build-Your-Own PC 1.6K Help Choosing Parts 205 Graphics Cards 150 CPU's, Memory and Motherboards 57 Cases and Power Supplies 18 Air and Liquid Cooling 10 Monitors and Displays 26 Peripherals 6 All Other Parts 15 Featured Categories We love seeing what our customers build Submit photos and a description of your PC to our build showcase Submit Now Looking for a little inspiration? See other custom PC builds and get some ideas for what can be done View Build Showcase View builds by: AMD Processors Intel Processors RTX 3090 RTX 3080 RTX 2080 Ti RTX 2080 Super RTX 2070 Super RTX 2070 RTX 2060 Super Radeon RX 5700XT Radeon RX 5700 Air Cooled Liquid Cooled SAME DAY CUSTOM BUILD SERVICE If You Can Dream it, We Can Build it. Services starting at $149.99 More Details Micro Center Homepage Desktops Laptops Computer Parts Computer Accessories Custom PC Builder Build Showcase Networking Electronics 3D Printing Service, Upgrades & Repairs Laptop Battery Replacement Laptop Screen Repair Virus and Malware Removal Hard Drive Recovery and Backup Apple MacBook Repair Custom Built PCs Schedule an Appointment © Vanilla Foundation Theme 2021 Powered By Vanilla Community Article What the freaking heck? — Micro Center Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker {$smarty.capture.menu} Activity Categories Discussions Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker Home › Store Information and Policy What the freaking heck? Betty ✭ February 18 in Store Information and Policy I ordered a computer for pick up in Tustin, but the receipt said it would be shipped to our PO box (really?). So, I went to Tustin and asked for the computer, which they said I would have to buy again and then cancel the online order (seriously?). So, I bought it and called the online number they gave me while I was standing there. I stayed on hold all the way back to Cerritos (half an hour in the car) and then my call was disconnected (yay!) So, then I tried to cancel in online...what? THERE IS NO WAY TO CANCEL ONLINE. Have y'all heard the term "user friendly?" You might want to try the concept on for size. So, then I left a message on a different chat, having absolutely no confidence it would do anything. And so, I am leaving this message, also. The order number is 12163337. You have my phone number. Please call me. My husband and I have bought computers from you for years, and this is the first 'Experience from Hell' I have had. Please make it the last. Please call me. Betty 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Comments TSTDavey admin February 19 Hello @Betty and thanks for posting on the Microcenter Community Forum. We apologize for the inconvenience. We will be emailing you here shortly. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Sign In or Register to comment. Howdy, Stranger! It looks like you're new here. If you want to get involved, click one of these buttons! Sign In with Micro Center Register Sign In with Micro Center Sign In Register Categories 6.3K All Categories 964 The Blog 42 What's Trending 146 How to & Technical Guides 6 Computer Hardware 116 Software 3 Home Office 5 Networking Audio/Visual 1 Home Automation 14 3D Printers 1 Maker 12 PC Build Guides 55 Reviews & Buying Guides 17 Build Showcase 9 Contests 32 Past Contests 402 The Community 1.4K General Discussion 89 New Members 31 Consumer Tech 11 Prebuilt PCs and Laptops 64 Software 2 Audio/Visual 2 Networking & Security Home Automation 2 Digital Photography 3 Content Creators 21 Hobby Boards & Projects 19 3D Printing 43 Retro Arcade/Gaming 73 All Other Tech 1.1K Store Information and Policy 41 Off Topic 2 Community Ideas & Feedback 108 Your Completed Builds 2.5K Build-Your-Own PC 1.6K Help Choosing Parts 205 Graphics Cards 150 CPU's, Memory and Motherboards 57 Cases and Power Supplies 18 Air and Liquid Cooling 10 Monitors and Displays 26 Peripherals 6 All Other Parts 15 Featured Categories We love seeing what our customers build Submit photos and a description of your PC to our build showcase Submit Now Looking for a little inspiration? See other custom PC builds and get some ideas for what can be done View Build Showcase View builds by: AMD Processors Intel Processors RTX 3090 RTX 3080 RTX 2080 Ti RTX 2080 Super RTX 2070 Super RTX 2070 RTX 2060 Super Radeon RX 5700XT Radeon RX 5700 Air Cooled Liquid Cooled SAME DAY CUSTOM BUILD SERVICE If You Can Dream it, We Can Build it. Services starting at $149.99 More Details Micro Center Homepage Desktops Laptops Computer Parts Computer Accessories Custom PC Builder Build Showcase Networking Electronics 3D Printing Service, Upgrades & Repairs Laptop Battery Replacement Laptop Screen Repair Virus and Malware Removal Hard Drive Recovery and Backup Apple MacBook Repair Custom Built PCs Schedule an Appointment © Vanilla Foundation Theme 2021 Powered By Vanilla Community Article Colonial Craigslist Sleeper - Micro Center Build — Micro Center Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker {$smarty.capture.menu} Activity Categories Discussions Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker Home › Your Completed Builds Colonial Craigslist Sleeper - Micro Center Build System test admin July 2020 edited July 2020 in Your Completed Builds Colonial Craigslist Sleeper - Micro Center Build My friend stumbled upon the case (some old Dell we think) at his work in a pile of scrap, the thing was covered in dust and oil it was a perfect candidate for what we always had in mind to build a scrapyard/craigslist sleeper with older budget parts and Read the full story here 1 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Comments LandShark admin July 2020 I love sleepers like this. I think you might be right, maybe Dell or Compaq? Natural patina like that is so hard to fake unless it's had real use over time. Your water cooling loop looks so sick! Especially with the UV/Black-light tones. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook TSTonyV admin July 2020 I love these! The idea of a sleeper PC is always something I've played around with in my head, since I love the concept of sleeper cars as well.  People thinking the 2700k is a high end part is pretty funny though. Perhaps they're thinking of the Ryzen 7 2700x? Granted, the 2700k is still serviceable even now.  1 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Sign In or Register to comment. Howdy, Stranger! It looks like you're new here. If you want to get involved, click one of these buttons! Sign In with Micro Center Register Sign In with Micro Center Sign In Register Categories 6.3K All Categories 964 The Blog 42 What's Trending 146 How to & Technical Guides 6 Computer Hardware 116 Software 3 Home Office 5 Networking Audio/Visual 1 Home Automation 14 3D Printers 1 Maker 12 PC Build Guides 55 Reviews & Buying Guides 17 Build Showcase 9 Contests 32 Past Contests 402 The Community 1.4K General Discussion 89 New Members 31 Consumer Tech 11 Prebuilt PCs and Laptops 64 Software 2 Audio/Visual 2 Networking & Security Home Automation 2 Digital Photography 3 Content Creators 21 Hobby Boards & Projects 19 3D Printing 43 Retro Arcade/Gaming 73 All Other Tech 1.1K Store Information and Policy 41 Off Topic 2 Community Ideas & Feedback 108 Your Completed Builds 2.5K Build-Your-Own PC 1.6K Help Choosing Parts 205 Graphics Cards 150 CPU's, Memory and Motherboards 57 Cases and Power Supplies 18 Air and Liquid Cooling 10 Monitors and Displays 26 Peripherals 6 All Other Parts 15 Featured Categories We love seeing what our customers build Submit photos and a description of your PC to our build showcase Submit Now Looking for a little inspiration? See other custom PC builds and get some ideas for what can be done View Build Showcase View builds by: AMD Processors Intel Processors RTX 3090 RTX 3080 RTX 2080 Ti RTX 2080 Super RTX 2070 Super RTX 2070 RTX 2060 Super Radeon RX 5700XT Radeon RX 5700 Air Cooled Liquid Cooled SAME DAY CUSTOM BUILD SERVICE If You Can Dream it, We Can Build it. Services starting at $149.99 More Details Micro Center Homepage Desktops Laptops Computer Parts Computer Accessories Custom PC Builder Build Showcase Networking Electronics 3D Printing Service, Upgrades & Repairs Laptop Battery Replacement Laptop Screen Repair Virus and Malware Removal Hard Drive Recovery and Backup Apple MacBook Repair Custom Built PCs Schedule an Appointment © Vanilla Foundation Theme 2021 Powered By Vanilla