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Showing 120 of 241 for “color”
Community Article RGB: Single Color or Hybrid? — Micro Center Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker {$smarty.capture.menu} Activity Categories Discussions Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker Home › General Discussion RGB: Single Color or Hybrid? SeanM admin January 22 edited June 16 in General Discussion We all know that if your computer is decked out in red RGB lights, you get 1.21 gigawatts more speed. But is it worth it to sacrifice that pulsing rainbow wave for a single color? Or maybe you want a blue highlight to streak through your all white lights. What do you think: just one color, or as many as possible? 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Comments Ian admin January 23 One color at a time 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook termin ✭ February 25 Single color 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Categories 6.7K All Categories 1K The Blog 34 What's Trending 164 How to & Technical Guides 10 Computer Hardware 119 Software 3 Home Office 6 Networking Audio/Visual 2 Home Automation 15 3D Printers 9 Maker 15 PC Build Guides 81 Reviews & Buying Guides 27 Build Showcase 13 Contests 35 Past Contests 819 The Community 1.7K General Discussion 105 New Members 86 Consumer Tech 26 Prebuilt PCs and Laptops 75 Software 2 Audio/Visual 12 Networking & Security 1 Home Automation 2 Digital Photography 3 Content Creators 21 Hobby Boards & Projects 23 3D Printing 49 Retro Arcade/Gaming 80 All Other Tech 1.2K Store Information and Policy 49 Off Topic 5 Community Ideas & Feedback 111 Your Completed Builds 2.6K Build-Your-Own PC 1.7K Help Choosing Parts 220 Graphics Cards 161 CPUs, Memory, and Motherboards 61 Cases and Power Supplies 19 Air and Liquid Cooling 13 Monitors and Displays 29 Peripherals 9 All Other Parts 21 Featured Categories We love seeing what our customers build Submit photos and a description of your PC to our build showcase Submit Now Looking for a little inspiration? See other custom PC builds and get some ideas for what can be done View Build Showcase View builds by: AMD Processors Intel Processors RTX 3090 RTX 3080 RTX 2080 Ti RTX 2080 Super RTX 2070 Super RTX 2070 RTX 2060 Super Radeon RX 5700XT Radeon RX 5700 Air Cooled Liquid Cooled SAME DAY CUSTOM BUILD SERVICE If You Can Dream it, We Can Build it. Services starting at $149.99 More Details Micro Center Homepage Desktops Laptops Computer Parts Computer Accessories Custom PC Builder Build Showcase Networking Electronics 3D Printing Service, Upgrades & Repairs Laptop Battery Replacement Laptop Screen Repair Virus and Malware Removal Hard Drive Recovery and Backup Apple MacBook Repair Custom Built PCs Schedule an Appointment © Vanilla Foundation Theme 2021 Powered By Vanilla Community Article PowerSpec B744: Fans turned solid red color from multi-color rotating - new computer — Micro Center Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker {$smarty.capture.menu} Activity Categories Discussions Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker Home › General Discussion PowerSpec B744: Fans turned solid red color from multi-color rotating - new computer JSchell9131 ✭ September 2020 in General Discussion I have lost the multi-colored CoolerMaster kaleidoscope and now only have solid RED for both CPU and Chassis fans. I have not been successful in finding a software  controller for these PWM RGB fans. This computer was purchased recently, and is an Intel i7-9700K Coffe Lake LGA 1511 ASUS Prime Z390-P motherboard. I have no thermal issues. Please advise. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Best Answers TSPhillipT admin September 2020 Accepted Answer Hello @JSchell9131 There is actually a physical controller that controls your fan colors. 1 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook BCX ✭ September 2020 Accepted Answer Wifey bought this computer. Advice was spot on. Figuring out how the buttons worked took a minute.  Wanted a dim purple color and managed to get it after a few minutes.  We will be looking later into if there is an RGB controller that will work with these fans.   5 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Answers JSchell9131 ✭ September 2020 Thank you, TSPhillipT (admin) for your response. I am having to add memory (64GB kit), and a 2TB hard-drive so I will physically inspect the physical controller that you have indicated via your response (graphic). I appreciate your input. I did check CoolerMaster to see what software products they provide to manipulate the PWM RGB/CPU/Chassis Fans, but found none for my fans. Upon installation of the upgrade in memory, and the addition of a Seagate 2TB 3.5inch hard-drive I will see if there are DIPS, or switches to ensure that I have all lights enabled. Upon initial boot, and several after of this new computer I had the array of colors (RGB), but it is now solid red as previously mentioned. I will update this post after I install the new hardware. Once again, I appreciated your response and information. Thank you. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook JSchell9131 ✭ September 2020 @BCX - Nice update. Thank you for the input. Yes, CoolerMaster has a nice line of USB external DC MODE/PWM MODE RGB Software Controllers for their CPU/Chassis Fans, but I saw none for my CoolerMaster model, nor any specifics for the Motherboard prerequisites. Will update you after the RipJaws Memory Updgrade, the install of the Seagate 2TB hard-disk-drive (3.5"), and restoring my Acronis True Image 2019 DISK IMAGES from my old HP Pavilion to the PowerSpec via Universal Boot/Restore utility disks (from BIOS/MBR/VBR to GPT). We will see if this works. Once again thanks for the input. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Categories 6.7K All Categories 1K The Blog 34 What's Trending 164 How to & Technical Guides 10 Computer Hardware 119 Software 3 Home Office 6 Networking Audio/Visual 2 Home Automation 15 3D Printers 9 Maker 15 PC Build Guides 81 Reviews & Buying Guides 27 Build Showcase 13 Contests 35 Past Contests 819 The Community 1.7K General Discussion 105 New Members 86 Consumer Tech 26 Prebuilt PCs and Laptops 75 Software 2 Audio/Visual 12 Networking & Security 1 Home Automation 2 Digital Photography 3 Content Creators 21 Hobby Boards & Projects 23 3D Printing 49 Retro Arcade/Gaming 80 All Other Tech 1.2K Store Information and Policy 49 Off Topic 5 Community Ideas & Feedback 111 Your Completed Builds 2.6K Build-Your-Own PC 1.7K Help Choosing Parts 220 Graphics Cards 161 CPUs, Memory, and Motherboards 61 Cases and Power Supplies 19 Air and Liquid Cooling 13 Monitors and Displays 29 Peripherals 9 All Other Parts 21 Featured Categories We love seeing what our customers build Submit photos and a description of your PC to our build showcase Submit Now Looking for a little inspiration? See other custom PC builds and get some ideas for what can be done View Build Showcase View builds by: AMD Processors Intel Processors RTX 3090 RTX 3080 RTX 2080 Ti RTX 2080 Super RTX 2070 Super RTX 2070 RTX 2060 Super Radeon RX 5700XT Radeon RX 5700 Air Cooled Liquid Cooled SAME DAY CUSTOM BUILD SERVICE If You Can Dream it, We Can Build it. Services starting at $149.99 More Details Micro Center Homepage Desktops Laptops Computer Parts Computer Accessories Custom PC Builder Build Showcase Networking Electronics 3D Printing Service, Upgrades & Repairs Laptop Battery Replacement Laptop Screen Repair Virus and Malware Removal Hard Drive Recovery and Backup Apple MacBook Repair Custom Built PCs Schedule an Appointment © Vanilla Foundation Theme 2021 Powered By Vanilla Community Article Acer Predator CG437K color calibration — Micro Center Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker {$smarty.capture.menu} Activity Categories Discussions Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker Home › Peripherals Acer Predator CG437K color calibration Jeroen North Bergen, NJ ✭ July 2020 edited June 3 in Peripherals Hello all, I recently bought this monitor and am trying to figure out what the best calibration is. I'd like to play my games in HDR (when possible) but noticed that (at least out of the box) the screen looks grayish and washed out when set to HDR mode in Windows 10. I've tinkered with NVIDIA control settings and got it somewhat decent, but it is still not great. My current settings are :  Brightness: Brightness 50 % Contrast 87% Gamma  1.10 Digital Vibrance  70% Hue  0 degrees   I've read that Windows 10 HDR settings still don't work well and may want to consider going back to SDR. Can anyone give me tips to make the screen look the best it can be?   Thank you,   Jeroen 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Comments TSTonyV admin July 2020 What refresh rate are you currently running on the monitor? If you've "overclocked" it through the on-screen menu up to 144Hz, apparently that prevents you from using HDR and G-sync on this display. Also, the on-screen menu has an HDR setting you can enable or disable, have you checked that? It should be under the picture menu.  1 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Jeroen North Bergen, NJ ✭ July 2020 Thank you for replying. I actually don't have the 144Hz function enabled. As you said, it prevents G-Sync and HDR. So now I am running at 3840*2160 (native) at 120Hz. I have turned on the HDR function on the monitor and also in Windows display setting. By default, it looked grayish and washed out a bit. I read about changing the NVIDIA control panel settings. (running a RTX 2080 Super). I've been tinkering with the settings above, but even though the screen is vibrant, the dark colors are not dark at all. I guess I've never really changed the default settings in Nvidia before as my previous monitors didn't really require it.  I know it's in the eye of the beholder, but what would you recommend that the settings should be in overall? Should I go to 144Hz and disregard HDR and G-Sync? 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook TSMichaelB admin July 2020 Jeroen said: Thank you for replying. I actually don't have the 144Hz function enabled. As you said, it prevents G-Sync and HDR. So now I am running at 3840*2160 (native) at 120Hz. I have turned on the HDR function on the monitor and also in Windows display setting. By default, it looked grayish and washed out a bit. I read about changing the NVIDIA control panel settings. (running a RTX 2080 Super). I've been tinkering with the settings above, but even though the screen is vibrant, the dark colors are not dark at all. I guess I've never really changed the default settings in Nvidia before as my previous monitors didn't really require it.  I know it's in the eye of the beholder, but what would you recommend that the settings should be in overall? Should I go to 144Hz and disregard HDR and G-Sync? These are all great questions. As you mentioned, this can be pretty subjective. Normally I would recommend looking at RTINGS for their settings with this panel, but it doesn't appear they've reviewed this model as of yet. That said, they do have their calibration guide available to help you calibrate with their downloaded patterns: https://www.rtings.com/monitor/learn/how-to-calibrate-your-monitor-settings.  Also keep in mind that when you tweak your settings, your ambient lighting will impact your viewing experience. A screen calibrated in a dark room will look dramatically different than a screen calibrated in a bright room and vice versa. I use an OLED TV for gaming, and I ended up calibrating multiple profiles, one for a dark room and one for a bright room, as the difference between the two can be staggering depending on the scene you are viewing. As for why your colors are washed out when enabling HDR, this is unfortunately a normal side effect of HDR. When you enable HDR, non-HDR content (SDR, standard sRGB, etc) are going to look washed out in comparison. It's only recommended to enable HDR when you are preparing to consume HDR content. More information on this can be found in the following resources: https://www.asus.com/support/FAQ/1041845/, https://www.dell.com/support/article/en-us/sln308136/colors-are-faded-and-washed-out-when-high-dynamic-range-is-enabled-in-windows-10?lang=en, and https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/help/4040263/windows-10-hdr-advanced-color-settings#:~:text=Make%20sure%20your%20display%20or%20TV%20has%20HDR%20turned%20on.&text=Go%20to%20Settings%20%3E%20System%20%3E%20Display,if%20your%20display%20supports%20HDR10.. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Jeroen North Bergen, NJ ✭ July 2020 Thank you TSMichaelB That makes sense, even though it sounds ridiculous on Microsoft's end.  You'd figure that they'd find a solution for that.  I will keep HDR turned off in Windows unless I will view HDR content. I guess games nowadays have settings to turn HDR on within games.  You're absolutely right about the ambient lighting. My computer is near a large window, which the sunlight would directly beam in the mornings. I like your idea to make a few profiles. Looks like this monitor can save these profiles. I'll give that a shot. I went to the Micro center store today and asked them about color calibration. They stated I should buy this color calibrator and download software for it. https://www.amazon.com/dp/B0055MBQOW?tag=georiot-us-default-20&th=1&psc=1&ascsubtag=dcw-us-6106266316775397000-20#ace-6003953244 I don't know if it is worth to buy this unless one is a graphic designer or something. Wonder if there is an easier way. I will check out the RTINGS site you provided. Thanks again for your input. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook TSMichaelB admin July 2020 Jeroen said: Thank you TSMichaelB That makes sense, even though it sounds ridiculous on Microsoft's end.  You'd figure that they'd find a solution for that.  I will keep HDR turned off in Windows unless I will view HDR content. I guess games nowadays have settings to turn HDR on within games.  You're absolutely right about the ambient lighting. My computer is near a large window, which the sunlight would directly beam in the mornings. I like your idea to make a few profiles. Looks like this monitor can save these profiles. I'll give that a shot. I went to the Micro center store today and asked them about color calibration. They stated I should buy this color calibrator and download software for it. https://www.amazon.com/dp/B0055MBQOW?tag=georiot-us-default-20&th=1&psc=1&ascsubtag=dcw-us-6106266316775397000-20#ace-6003953244 I don't know if it is worth to buy this unless one is a graphic designer or something. Wonder if there is an easier way. I will check out the RTINGS site you provided. Thanks again for your input. You're very welcome. I wouldn't recommend buying a color calibration tool unless you do work that requires extreme color accuracy. For the most part, you should be fine to eyeball it using the sample images available on RTINGS. As for the HDR issue with Windows, I agree entirely. I would imagine they could build a Windows theme around HDR content, and have it enable the moment you enable the HDR settings. This would force the desktop and settings to utilize HDR. The only issue with this idea is that there are still integrated Windows applications that wouldn't support HDR, and those would still look washed out in their individual application windows, but that would still be a far better compromise than the current solution. Hopefully we see better HDR support going forward, as I would like to utilize it more often on my OLED display as well. For gaming, it really is great technology. 1 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook DarthMadMatt ✭ January 2 edited January 3 This is the only thread I could find discussing settings for this monitor so I hope people are still looking. I've been playing with the settings on this monitor for months second guessing myself. As it is for most the time I owned the monito I wasn't using HDR correctly. I too thought things were way too washed out. When I called Acer support they told me the monitor had its own algorithm and not to enable HDR in windows or console or it would double interpret. When you put the HDR setting on the monitor only it is slightly brighter and sharper than SDR (and SDR is supposed to be phenomenal on this monitor) so I believed him. It never set right with me though, HDR is supposed to be different enough. After I got my LG CX I realized I was lied to. Well long story later I ended up enabling HDR and fine tuning my calibrations. I had been playing with brightness and contrast independent but not at the same time. It wasn't until I set mine to B=37 C=87-100 G=.87-1.0 DV=.5 that I was like OK that looks about right!. I used some test patterns and games and what not to get where I was. I came across this thread seeing if I could find further tweaks. I got the brightness from test patterns, but there is the occasional game that needs me to set it higher (45-50 Witcher 3). If I go over 87 contrast it starts to black crush a little too much but sometimes it kills washed out blacks. The gamma I am going to tinker with now as I lowered mine to kill washed out blacks, but I see raising it makes things pop a little more and the is more details in the dark areas. DV I thought anything over 50% looked fake before, but I will check it out. Hope everyone is enjoying their monitors as I am. It is pretty nice when you get it set right and NO BURN IN! LOL Just have to sit back a bit or it burns the eyeballs. Share more comments please. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook DarthMadMatt ✭ January 2 edited January 3  Just to follow up, after playing with it a little more I am floating around: B=45-47 C=95-97 G=1.03-1.05 DV=57-64 I like the Pop the DV adds. The gamma kind of offsets the brightness reduction (I did for some washed out blacks). It seems my eyes change from day to day as to what looks right but this seems to look decent to me right now LOL! I tried it in a few games and checked SDR as well and they seemed pretty usable with some tweaks within games. Witcher 3 needed contrast cut back to low 50s to look good, so I don't know how often that sort of thin will come in to play. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Jeroen North Bergen, NJ ✭ January 5 Hey DarthMadMatt, You're right, I couldn't find anything on the net on this monitor. It's like people would like to forget about this thing lol. Thanks for responding though. I have tried your settings stated above. They seem to look better than what I had. To tell you the truth, I gave up on HDR with this monitor. There is so much hassle to get this monitor to look respectable. I tried with the settings above (HDR enabled in Windows) but it still was giving that washy look. With HDR disabled in Windows (but enabled on the monitor itself, HDR-1000), it actually doesn't look half bad. I will keep these settings until more refined.  Now to see if I should go to 144Hz (and giving up G-sync/freesync) or to stay on 120Hz with both options on. Thanks for sharing 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook DarthMadMatt ✭ January 12 edited January 28 I like the 120hz with everything. I'm glad for your original post as its got me messing around more with the monitor and liking the results. So now I'm trying to lock-in some settings and forget it lol. I now have set the monitor on HDR and set to auto not HDR 1000. Also with Windows HDR enabled the monitor's brightness locks at 100 but when HDR mode is not enabled in windows I have it set at 70. I am trying to keep things as constant as possible so B=50 C=(75-80 for SDR or 95-100 in windows HDR mode)  G=.91-.92 DV=73. So the only thing I am changing right now is the contrast depending on if it is actual HDR content or not. The rest I set in game.  Good luck and thanks for the thread(s)! 1 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook BrutalBipedal ✭ January 24 Hi all, I have the exact issue with the washed out black colours on the CG7. Where do you go to change the colours individually as mentioned by @DarthMadMatt and how? Thanks 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook TSMikeW admin January 24 @BrutalBipedal Should be under color in the OSD. You can find the manual here: https://www.acer.com/ac/en/US/content/support-product/8138?b=1 Also, Acer does provide a color calibration tool. This is really for desktop apps, but I'll link it: https://www.acer.com/ac/en/US/content/color-calibrator  0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook DarthMadMatt ✭ January 24 The settings I posted were through the NVIDIA control panel 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook BrutalBipedal ✭ January 24 DarthMadMatt said: The settings I posted were through the NVIDIA control panel Where? 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook DarthMadMatt ✭ January 24 Adjust desktop color settings in the NVIDIA control panel. This is for my RTX 3080. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook BrutalBipedal ✭ January 24 TSMikeW said: @BrutalBipedal Should be under color in the OSD. You can find the manual here: https://www.acer.com/ac/en/US/content/support-product/8138?b=1 Also, Acer does provide a color calibration tool. This is really for desktop apps, but I'll link it: https://www.acer.com/ac/en/US/content/color-calibrator  Thanks I've tried the tool and my monitor is not supported.  0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook BrutalBipedal ✭ January 24 This is such an odd issue, when HDR is turned on within the monitor and the Windows HDR is turned off it looks beautiful but then the game settings don't pick up HDR?  0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook LandShark admin January 25 Have you tried turning off HDR in Windows and in the monitor settings? Then turning on HDR in the game settings? Sometimes the settings in the system or in the monitor will override the settings of the game. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook DarthMadMatt ✭ January 29 edited January 31 You have to have HDR mode on auto or on on the monitor for HDR to be an option in most games. Something is just not quite right with the HDR on this monitor. Some things look pretty good but a lot of things look washed out and fuzzy when things are set correctly. I think some of this has to do with the state of HDR in general, but also to do with only 8bit color and the lack of ability to adjust HDR settings on this monitor (there is a gamma or white point problem). My PS5 didn't look near as good on this monitor as it does on my OLED (which is why I started searching for other peoples settings). Like the OP, I am starting to say screw fiddling with HDR. You have to adjust every time game specific. I am setting it to HDR AUTO on the monitor and leaving it at the Nvidia settings I posted earlier (B=50, C=75-80 65 for Witcher 3, G=.91-.92,DV=72-73). Some games need tweaking of the contrast setting, but thats all I have been changing. Also with the monitor set to auto and HDR off in Windows you can do as you mentioned and turn HDR on in games that support it (very few), but you have to adjust the contrast and everything anyway so you may as well just enable HDR in Windows when you intend to use it (whats one more click?).  0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook LandShark admin January 29 Glad to have your input here @DarthMadMatt. Thanks for sharing! 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook MadDarthMatt ✭ March 21 edited June 29 SDR: User mode (monitor) Black Boost= 1 Gamma 2.2 Normal Brightness 100 B=50 C=50 G=1.0 DV=50 HDR HDR 1000 mode (monitor and Windows) SDR/HDR brightness balance 50 B=50 C=100 G=1.0 DV=59/67 Some games DO NOT enable HDR in-game 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook MadDarthMatt ✭ April 30 edited May 16 FYI this is preference, but if you want to get rid of the black smears etc you need to be close to the displays native refresh rate (120). Trust me, it took a while for me to get that 60fps does not necessarily mean smooth, crisp graphics. If you get a lot of smearing, ghosting etc, do what I have done and set the monitor at 1440p. At least for games. The smoothness trumps any extra detail you see when standing still. I have been using it as 1440p only for desktop as well and its nice not having to scale anything. 1 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook MadDarthMatt ✭ May 3 Want to see something cool? Set Nvidia settings to default (50, 50, 1, 50). Put monitor in STANDARD mode and change the COLOR SPACE to DCI. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook MadDarthMatt ✭ May 8 edited October 7 The most decent HDR settings I have found so far are: HDR HDR 1000 mode, HDR on in Windows, SDR/HDR brightness balance 100. B=50 C=100 G=1.10 DV=55-60 Make sure when playing a game that you are in true FULLSCREEN mode (NOTE a lot of times if you ctrl alt del out and switch back to the game it switches out of FULLSCREEN mode, and sometimes it still says FULLSCREEN in the game options. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook MadDarthMatt ✭ May 12 edited October 5 Sorry to hijack the thread, but I feel when you pay good money for a monitor you shouldn't have to settle and anything I can do to help someone else like me who isn't an expert but knows it doesn't look right as is. This monitor is DEFINITELY for the enthusiast. There are many ways to make it look decent. My latest SDR settings are the closest to looking correct : Monitor HDR 1000 mode, NO HDR mode in windows NVIDIA set to B50 C77 G1.0 DV50 Monitor Brightness 100 OR NO HDR mode in windows NVIDIA set to B50 C77 G1.0 DV50 (note NOT reference mode) Monitor USER mode (can save as different modes later) Monitor Brightness 100 (or to taste) Monitor Contrast 50 Monitor Black Boost 5 Monitor Color Normal to taste Monitor Gamma 2.2 NOTE: Sometimes Nvidia color profile switches to windows default and you have to check Override to desktop reference, then uncheck it, then apply to get the colors to go back right. Anyway good luck to all! Hopefully my next post about a monitor will be about a slightly smaller OLED (though the 43" has grown on me) 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Categories 6.7K All Categories 1K The Blog 34 What's Trending 164 How to & Technical Guides 10 Computer Hardware 119 Software 3 Home Office 6 Networking Audio/Visual 2 Home Automation 15 3D Printers 9 Maker 15 PC Build Guides 81 Reviews & Buying Guides 27 Build Showcase 13 Contests 35 Past Contests 819 The Community 1.7K General Discussion 105 New Members 86 Consumer Tech 26 Prebuilt PCs and Laptops 75 Software 2 Audio/Visual 12 Networking & Security 1 Home Automation 2 Digital Photography 3 Content Creators 21 Hobby Boards & Projects 23 3D Printing 49 Retro Arcade/Gaming 80 All Other Tech 1.2K Store Information and Policy 49 Off Topic 5 Community Ideas & Feedback 111 Your Completed Builds 2.6K Build-Your-Own PC 1.7K Help Choosing Parts 220 Graphics Cards 161 CPUs, Memory, and Motherboards 61 Cases and Power Supplies 19 Air and Liquid Cooling 13 Monitors and Displays 29 Peripherals 9 All Other Parts 21 Featured Categories We love seeing what our customers build Submit photos and a description of your PC to our build showcase Submit Now Looking for a little inspiration? See other custom PC builds and get some ideas for what can be done View Build Showcase View builds by: AMD Processors Intel Processors RTX 3090 RTX 3080 RTX 2080 Ti RTX 2080 Super RTX 2070 Super RTX 2070 RTX 2060 Super Radeon RX 5700XT Radeon RX 5700 Air Cooled Liquid Cooled SAME DAY CUSTOM BUILD SERVICE If You Can Dream it, We Can Build it. Services starting at $149.99 More Details Micro Center Homepage Desktops Laptops Computer Parts Computer Accessories Custom PC Builder Build Showcase Networking Electronics 3D Printing Service, Upgrades & Repairs Laptop Battery Replacement Laptop Screen Repair Virus and Malware Removal Hard Drive Recovery and Backup Apple MacBook Repair Custom Built PCs Schedule an Appointment © Vanilla Foundation Theme 2021 Powered By Vanilla Community Article How to enable color filters in Windows 10 - Micro Center Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker {$smarty.capture.menu} Activity Categories Discussions Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker How to enable color filters in Windows 10 - Micro Center This article will show you how to enable color filters in Windows 10. These filters will apply to everything on your system. This will allow for the computer to be seen in grayscale or to be adjusted for colorblindness. Here is how to enable those filters: 1.  Right click on the Start button, typically found at the lower left corner of the screen, then click on Settings. 2.  From the Windows Settings screen that appears, select Ease of Access. 3.  On the Settings page that opens, scroll down on the left side under “Interaction” and select Color Filters. 4.  Under the option for “Turn on color filters”, click the slider next to “Off” to enable this. 5.  The options below for color filters will now be able to be selected. Select an option here to activate the filter. A color wheel will appear at the bottom of the screen to help determine the best filter option. © Vanilla Foundation Theme 2021 Powered By Vanilla Community Article How to change the Highlight Color in Mac OS - Micro Center Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker {$smarty.capture.menu} Activity Categories Discussions Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker How to change the Highlight Color in Mac OS - Micro Center This article will show how to change the highlight color in Mac OS X. Highlight color refers to the color used when clicking and dragging the mouse over certain words or items. The default highlight color is blue. 1. From the Apple Menu Bar, click the Apple icon generally located in the top left corner and select System Preferences. 2. Click on General. 3. Pick a color selection from the drop down box beside Highlight Color and it will automatically apply the selected color. © Vanilla Foundation Theme 2021 Powered By Vanilla Community Article ReadyView - Camera Image Black and White and Not in Color - Micro Center Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker {$smarty.capture.menu} Activity Categories Discussions Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker ReadyView - Camera Image Black and White and Not in Color - Micro Center ISSUE The image is in black and white rather than in color. CAUSE In low light conditions, the image may switch to black and white. SOLUTION The image will automatically switch to color when there is sufficient lighting. © Vanilla Foundation Theme 2021 Powered By Vanilla Community Article Windows 10 Display Color Calibration Tips & Tricks — Micro Center Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker {$smarty.capture.menu} Activity Categories Discussions Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker Home › How to & Technical Guides › Software Windows 10 Display Color Calibration Tips & Tricks Ian admin April 2020 edited June 3 in Software If you're not happy with how your monitor looks on your Windows 10 PC, you can use the built in calibration software to help you pick out some new settings for your monitor. The Windows 10 Display Color Calibration is a built-in tool that will walk you through step by step with various settings and changes that are available to get your monitor/display looking its best. Here is how to go through the calibration:  1.   Check your monitor manual on how to navigate the monitor calibrations. Depending on monitor, there will typically be a Menu button for monitor settings found somewhere on the physical monitor. This will vary by monitor, but commonly is found on the bottom or right side of the monitor. The picture below is just an example of what this may look like on your monitor:   The monitor itself will have plenty of settings found in its menu that can be adjusted as well, so be sure to look through the various options / presets your monitor may offer. 2.  To continue with the Windows calibration settings, if you are running multiple monitor setups, make sure the correct monitor is selected first. Go into Display Settings by right clicking on the desktop and selecting Display Settings on the menu.   3.   Under Resolution, click the drop-down box and choose the one with recommended in parenthesis beside it. If you have multiple displays, make sure you select each monitor in the Display Settings window and repeat this step.     4.   Click the search box by the Windows Start Menu and search for calibrate. Click on Calibrate display color.     5.   Choose the best Gamma option. Gamma changes color values and the amount of light emitted for each value. Move the slider up and down to change any settings, then click Next to continue.     6.   Choose the best brightness option. You will need to use the controls found on your monitor directly to adjust the brightness, and can use the reference picture to pick your preferring setting. Once finished, click on Next.   7. Choose the best contrast option. You will need to use the controls found on your monitor directly to adjust the contrast, and can use the reference picture to pick your preferring setting. Once finished, click on Next. 8.   The next setting to be changed is for color balance, which allows you to change the color value for red, blue, and green. You will need to use the controls found on your monitor directly to adjust the contrast, and can use the reference picture to pick your preferring setting. Once finished, click on Next.   9.   The final screen allows you to compare your previous settings with the new changes. Click Finish if you are satisfied with the new calibration or click on Cancel if you are not and wish to discard it.   0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Categories 6.7K All Categories 1K The Blog 34 What's Trending 164 How to & Technical Guides 10 Computer Hardware 119 Software 3 Home Office 6 Networking Audio/Visual 2 Home Automation 15 3D Printers 9 Maker 15 PC Build Guides 81 Reviews & Buying Guides 27 Build Showcase 13 Contests 35 Past Contests 819 The Community 1.7K General Discussion 105 New Members 86 Consumer Tech 26 Prebuilt PCs and Laptops 75 Software 2 Audio/Visual 12 Networking & Security 1 Home Automation 2 Digital Photography 3 Content Creators 21 Hobby Boards & Projects 23 3D Printing 49 Retro Arcade/Gaming 80 All Other Tech 1.2K Store Information and Policy 49 Off Topic 5 Community Ideas & Feedback 111 Your Completed Builds 2.6K Build-Your-Own PC 1.7K Help Choosing Parts 220 Graphics Cards 161 CPUs, Memory, and Motherboards 61 Cases and Power Supplies 19 Air and Liquid Cooling 13 Monitors and Displays 29 Peripherals 9 All Other Parts 21 Featured Categories We love seeing what our customers build Submit photos and a description of your PC to our build showcase Submit Now Looking for a little inspiration? See other custom PC builds and get some ideas for what can be done View Build Showcase View builds by: AMD Processors Intel Processors RTX 3090 RTX 3080 RTX 2080 Ti RTX 2080 Super RTX 2070 Super RTX 2070 RTX 2060 Super Radeon RX 5700XT Radeon RX 5700 Air Cooled Liquid Cooled SAME DAY CUSTOM BUILD SERVICE If You Can Dream it, We Can Build it. Services starting at $149.99 More Details Micro Center Homepage Desktops Laptops Computer Parts Computer Accessories Custom PC Builder Build Showcase Networking Electronics 3D Printing Service, Upgrades & Repairs Laptop Battery Replacement Laptop Screen Repair Virus and Malware Removal Hard Drive Recovery and Backup Apple MacBook Repair Custom Built PCs Schedule an Appointment © Vanilla Foundation Theme 2021 Powered By Vanilla Community Article How to change App Mode Color in Windows 10 - Micro Center Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker {$smarty.capture.menu} Activity Categories Discussions Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker How to change App Mode Color in Windows 10 - Micro Center Are you looking to switch from light to dark mode (or vice-versa) on your Windows 10 PC? This article will show how to change the Windows 10 app mode color between its light and dark options. This changes the default color scheme for most applications within Windows. Here is how to change these settings: 1. Right-click on the Start button, typically found at the lower-left corner of the screen, then click on Settings. 2.  From the Windows Settings screen that appears, select Personalization. 3. From the left side under Personalization Settings, click on Colors. 4. Under "Choose your color," you can select between Light, Dark, and Custom. Any changes to the colors are made automatically. 5. If you select Custom, you can choose between Light and Dark mode for the default Windows mode and default app mode separately. Any changes will be made automatically to your PC's color scheme. © Vanilla Foundation Theme 2021 Powered By Vanilla Community Article Windows 10 Display Color Calibration Tips & Tricks - Micro Center Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker {$smarty.capture.menu} Activity Categories Discussions Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker Windows 10 Display Color Calibration Tips & Tricks - Micro Center If you're not happy with how your monitor looks on your Windows 10 PC, you can use the built in display calibration software to help you pick out some new settings for your monitor. The Windows 10 Display Color Calibration is a built-in tool that will walk you through step by step with various settings and changes that are available to get your monitor/display looking its best. Here is how to go through the calibration:  1.  Check your monitor manual on how to navigate the monitor calibrations. Depending on monitor, there will typically be a Menu button for monitor settings found somewhere on the physical monitor. This will vary by monitor, but commonly is found on the bottom or right side of the monitor. The picture below is just an example of what this may look like on your monitor: The monitor itself will have plenty of settings found in its menu that can be adjusted as well, so be sure to look through the various options/presets your monitor offers. 2. To continue with the Windows 10 calibration settings, if you are running multiple monitor setups, make sure the correct monitor is selected first. Go into Display Settings by right clicking on the desktop and selecting Display Settings on the menu.   3.  Under Resolution, click the drop-down box and choose the one with recommended in parenthesis beside it. If you have multiple displays, make sure you select each monitor in the Display Settings window and repeat this step.   4.  Click the search box by the Windows Start Menu and search for calibrate. Click on Calibrate display color.   5.  Choose the best Gamma option. Gamma changes color values and the amount of light emitted for each value. Move the slider up and down to change any settings, then click Next to continue. NOTE: In each of the below screenshots, the example pictures colors may look different on your monitor. Please ensure you are adjusting/looking at the examples directly on your PC to adjust your monitor's color and settings, not the pictures in our guide.   6.  Choose the best brightness option. You will need to use the controls found on your monitor directly to adjust the brightness and can use the reference picture to pick your preferred setting. Once finished, click on Next.   7. Choose the best contrast option. You will need to use the controls found on your monitor directly to adjust the contrast and can use the reference picture to pick your preferred setting. Once finished, click on Next. 8.  The next setting to be changed is for color balance, which allows you to change the color value for red, blue and green. You will need to use the controls found on your monitor directly to adjust the contrast and can use the reference picture to pick your preferred setting. Once finished, click on Next.   9.  The final screen allows you to compare your previous settings with the new changes. Click Finish if you are satisfied with the new calibration or click on Cancel if you are not and wish to discard it.   © Vanilla Foundation Theme 2021 Powered By Vanilla Community Article How to adjust Pointer Size and Color in Windows 10 - Micro Center Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker {$smarty.capture.menu} Activity Categories Discussions Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker How to adjust Pointer Size and Color in Windows 10 - Micro Center This article will show how to change the mouse pointer size and color in Windows 10. This can be done with just a few simple steps! 1. Right click on the Start button, typically found at the lower left corner of the screen, then click on Settings. 2. From the Windows Settings screen that appears, click on Ease of Access. 3. From the Ease of Access menu, click on Cursor & pointer. 4. Under Change pointer size, adjust the slider to make changes to the size of the cursor. This updates automatically as you move the slider. The default Windows setting is for the slider to be all the way to the left (smallest cursor). 5.) Under Change pointer color, click on any of the boxes to change between a white, black inverted color or custom color mouse. When selecting the custom option, you may pick from one of the Windows custom colors, or select your own by clicking on Pick a custom pointer color. Changes are made automatically. The default Windows setting is the white mouse - the farthest option to the left. These settings may be changed/reverted at any time. © Vanilla Foundation Theme 2021 Powered By Vanilla Community Article Two of the same SKU monitors, different color depth on each — Micro Center Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker {$smarty.capture.menu} Activity Categories Discussions Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker Home › General Discussion Two of the same SKU monitors, different color depth on each Zach ✭ June 2020 in General Discussion Hey everyone, So I bought an Acer VG240Y back in February of 2020. I later decided to run a dual monitor setup and picked up a second of the exact same monitor today now that they are back in stock. Long story short, the monitors are the same, the SKU's are the same, but one monitor is running at a 10-bit color depth while the other is running at a 12-bit color depth. Additionally, when I look at each monitor separately in the "Advanced display settings" it shows that my first monitor is a "VG240Y P" and the one I bought today is a "VG240Y V". Is the V and P at the end of each something that Windows 10 puts there to allow for separate identification, or are they legitimately two different sub models (maybe?) of the same model monitor? My next question is, if they were suppose to be the same--what happened? 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Comments Ian admin June 2020 Greetings. I have opened up an email ticket with you about this, please respond back so we can check into this further for you. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Zach ✭ June 2020 @TSIanL Thank you, I received the email. New problem though..... my old display has now stopped working all of a sudden. It is no longer being detected by my PC in any way shape or form. Swapped out the cords and still nothing. Did installing this new one just roast my old one? Or maybe my computer/GC is having issues detecting two "different" monitors? 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook TSTonyV admin June 2020 It's more likely an issue with the video card than it is the monitor, though it's always possible the monitor went bad. I would start by reinstalling your video drivers for your computer, then re-attaching everything. Make sure your monitor is on the correct input, and try unplugging/replugging its power cord as well.  0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Zach ✭ June 2020 @TSTonyV So there's a handful of issues going on with this monitor lol I've been on the phone with Acer with the past hour. The monitors are in fact different -____- 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Categories 6.7K All Categories 1K The Blog 34 What's Trending 164 How to & Technical Guides 10 Computer Hardware 119 Software 3 Home Office 6 Networking Audio/Visual 2 Home Automation 15 3D Printers 9 Maker 15 PC Build Guides 81 Reviews & Buying Guides 27 Build Showcase 13 Contests 35 Past Contests 818 The Community 1.7K General Discussion 105 New Members 86 Consumer Tech 26 Prebuilt PCs and Laptops 75 Software 2 Audio/Visual 12 Networking & Security 1 Home Automation 2 Digital Photography 3 Content Creators 21 Hobby Boards & Projects 23 3D Printing 49 Retro Arcade/Gaming 80 All Other Tech 1.2K Store Information and Policy 49 Off Topic 5 Community Ideas & Feedback 111 Your Completed Builds 2.6K Build-Your-Own PC 1.7K Help Choosing Parts 220 Graphics Cards 161 CPUs, Memory, and Motherboards 61 Cases and Power Supplies 19 Air and Liquid Cooling 13 Monitors and Displays 28 Peripherals 9 All Other Parts 21 Featured Categories We love seeing what our customers build Submit photos and a description of your PC to our build showcase Submit Now Looking for a little inspiration? See other custom PC builds and get some ideas for what can be done View Build Showcase View builds by: AMD Processors Intel Processors RTX 3090 RTX 3080 RTX 2080 Ti RTX 2080 Super RTX 2070 Super RTX 2070 RTX 2060 Super Radeon RX 5700XT Radeon RX 5700 Air Cooled Liquid Cooled SAME DAY CUSTOM BUILD SERVICE If You Can Dream it, We Can Build it. Services starting at $149.99 More Details Micro Center Homepage Desktops Laptops Computer Parts Computer Accessories Custom PC Builder Build Showcase Networking Electronics 3D Printing Service, Upgrades & Repairs Laptop Battery Replacement Laptop Screen Repair Virus and Malware Removal Hard Drive Recovery and Backup Apple MacBook Repair Custom Built PCs Schedule an Appointment © Vanilla Foundation Theme 2021 Powered By Vanilla Community Article Gaming or Work: How to Choose the Best Monitor - Micro Center Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker {$smarty.capture.menu} Activity Categories Discussions Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker Gaming or Work: How to Choose the Best Monitor - Micro Center With the sheer number of monitors on the market, selecting the right one can be a daunting task. Whether you’re a gamer or if you live in Microsoft Office at your desk, we’ll help you with some key features to look out for when picking out your display. TN vs. IPS vs. VA vs. OLED – What Panel Type is Right For Me? There are several different screen technologies, ranging from OLED, IPS, TN, and VA, and each have their advantages and disadvantages. Traditionally, gamers often opted for TN, or Twisted Nematic, displays, which comes with fast refresh rates and response times in a more affordable package, especially when compared to IPS technology. The weakness with TN panels is that they often have poorer color support and viewing angles could be more limited. Still, TN panels offer an excellent and affordable solution for beginning gamers who need a monitor fast enough to keep up with the on-screen action. Office workers, on the other hand, historically chose IPS screens for color accuracy, but these screens are often expensive and sometimes come with slower response times. That said, technology has greatly improved over the past few years, and many gamers have opted for IPS screens. Along with a more affordable price today – AOC’s IPS monitor starts at just $109 – and support for refresh rates as fast as 240Hz or even 360Hz, IPS is becoming the de facto choice for many gamers who can’t afford a more premium OLED screen. AOC 24B2XH 23.8" What Size Monitor Do I Need? Gamers who want to see more of their games have a slew of options to get a larger view. The most direct approach is to choose the largest monitor you can afford. Alienware, for example, offers a pricy 55-inch 4K OLED gaming monitor that can essentially replace your living room television, but there are more manageable screens within the 20- or 30-inch range. Compared to IPS panels, OLED screens gain punchy and bright colors and the 120Hz refresh rate ensures you won’t miss the action. Often, gaming monitors bear the traditional 16:9 aspect ratio – a format derived from the 1080p display. If you choose a smaller 20- or 30-inch monitor, you can purchase a monitor stand to connect two or more monitors in a multi-monitor setup, giving you a wider, panoramic view. And when you’re taking time off from gaming, this setup is perfect for work, as multitaskers can spread open plenty of windows to cover both screens. For a truly immersive experience, the third option is an ultrawide screen. Given how large and wide the ultrawide screens can be, the displays often are curved to ensure that you’ll have corner-to-corner visibility. Panels like the Asus XG49VQ can reach 49 inches in diagonal. If you find yourself gaming on a monitor that was designed for productivity applications, chances are you’ll find that the screen itself is unable to keep pace with the action. For MMO gamers, this can really affect your gaming performance, with artifacts such as screen stutters, lags, and ghosting. ASUS XG49VQ 49" What is a FreeSync Monitor? What does G-Sync Mean? To get the best performance, you’ll want to find a display that best pairs with your graphics card. If you’re gaming on a Radeon GPU made by AMD, you’ll want to opt for a monitor that supports FreeSync technology, while GeForce gamers on Nvidia’s GPUs will want to find a G-Sync compatible monitor. FreeSync and G-Sync are adaptive screen sync technologies that work in similar ways to help smooth out the graphics on your screen. When you’re playing a game with a higher framerate than the refresh rate supported by your monitor, for example, you’ll see tearing and stuttering. Adaptive sync corrects this by handling the rendering and processing of the graphics, so images display smoothly. The 3 Rs of Gaming Monitors: Resolution, Refresh Rates, & Response Times After you’ve determined if you need a G-Sync or FreeSync display, you’ll want to check the three Rs of gaming displays – resolution, refresh rates, and response times. Most gamers will want to start with a 1080p monitor. Not only is this resolution the most affordable, but they’ll give you the best performance, even on more budget GPUs. If you have a more entry-level graphics card and try to play at 4K resolution, you’ll likely encounter a lot of dropped frames, making the experience horrible. That said, if you’re busting out with a top-of-the-line Nvidia GeForce RTX 3080 this year, then going 4K will give you a lot of flexibility for the future. The next thing to look out for is refresh rate. Refresh rate is critical in reducing lags and stutters on-screen, and you’ll want to find a monitor with a high refresh rate. In general, you’ll want a screen with a minimum 60Hz refresh rate, though 120Hz or higher is still recommended. Enthusiast gamers will want to go even higher with a 240Hz panel. When budget is a concern, there is a trade-off when it comes to resolution and refresh rates. eSports gamers need an extremely fast display and will want to stick to a 1080p or 1440p monitor with a high refresh rate.  Another key specification to look out for is response time. You’ll want a screen that can respond to changes quickly, so a faster response time is ideal. Together, these three Rs help to fight latency and lag. Acer’s 27-inch Predator XB271HY is a solid choice with its 165Hz refresh rate. This panel checks off a lot of items on the list and is priced at just $499. If you really want to go into overkill territory, the Predator X35 is a 35-inch monitor with QHD resolution, curved IPS LED display, and 180Hz refresh rate that sells for $1,799. Acer Predator XB271HU 27" HDR, Brightness, Color, & Contrast Both AMD and Nvidia have introduced real-time raytracing support into their GPUs, and game developers are leveraging this technology to render scenes in a game more realistically. Raytracing essentially allows a game to render, in real-time, how light is reflected, refracted, or absorbed onto various surfaces in a scene for cinematic effect. To take advantage of a game’s visuals – and draw detail and attention to the darkest of shadows – you’ll want a bright monitor that can support HDR. There are various DisplayHDR support levels, ranging from HDR400 to HDR1000, with the highest number being the best. HDR monitors help with contrast, support a wide dynamic range for life-like rendering, and are often brighter than monitors without HDR. If you’re playing games with a lot of dark scenes, HDR will help you spot the enemies in the shadows! Dell’s S3220DGF is an affordable 32-inch curved gaming monitor that supports HDR400 for just $449. Dell S3220DGF 32" Connectivity is King At CES 2021 this year, a new standard that’s emerging is the new HDMI 2.1 standard. The standard is ideal for gamers who like to switch between PC and console gaming, but you’ll need a monitor that supports HDMI 2.1. Because HDMI 2.1 supports more bandwidth over its cable, gamers no longer need to choose between resolution or fast refresh rates. The standard supports 4K resolution at up to 120fps or 8K content at 60fps. Along with dynamic HDR, support for variable refresh rate, and quick frame transport to reduce lag, gamers will find lots to love with this new standard. We found a handful of monitors with HDMI 2.1 announced at CES, but expect more to come soon! © Vanilla Foundation Theme 2021 Powered By Vanilla Community Article 3D Printing a Retropie Handheld Case with Custom Icons — Micro Center Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker {$smarty.capture.menu} Activity Categories Discussions Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker Home › Consumer Tech › 3D Printing 3D Printing a Retropie Handheld Case with Custom Icons NickBiederman admin September 2020 edited September 2020 in 3D Printing Recently I decided to print a case for my PiGrrl 2 with the Atari logo on it. PiGrrl is a series of Raspberry Pi powered portable emulation consoles produced by Adafruit. PiGrrl 2 is the most recent version to use a full-sized Raspberry Pi, so it’s more powerful than the three other versions. Here’s a picture of the result: Before printing, I needed to add the Atari logo to the .stl. Since Adafruit distributes the Fusion 360 source files, I would generally use Fusion to make these changes. However, I didn’t have Fusion installed on the computer I was working on, so I decided to use Tinkercad instead. Tinkercad is Autodesk’s browser-based 3D modeling program. It’s not as powerful as Fusion 360, but it’s excellent for building models with simple geometry or tasks like embossing a logo onto an .stl. After making a Tinkercad account, you’ll need to get a hold of the .stl you want to emboss a logo onto and a .svg of the logo. I downloaded the .stl from Adafruit’s thing on Thingiverse and used a .ai of the Atari logo I exported as a .svg for this project. Once you have your files, import the .stl into Tinkercad and make sure it’s solid. Solids will show up as an opaque colored object. Holes are transparent grey. After importing the .stl, import the .svg and scale it to the desired size. Here you can see my .svg came in far too large and oriented incorrectly, so I had to rotate it in addition to scaling. Copy and paste the logo, then make one copy a hole and one a solid. Extrude the solid below the build surface. This extra bit of extrusion will help us select the proper pieces later on. Place both the hole and the solid logo in place on the .stl. I found it easiest to stack the logos and move them into place at the same time. You can see the stacked logos before I moved them into place below. Select everything by pressing ctrl+a, then deselect the solid logo by holding shift and clicking it. This will be much easier if part of it sits below the build platform. Press ctrl+g to group the solid and hole together, creating a cavity in the solid. Here I have moved the logo to the side showing the result of grouping the solid and hole together.  Extrude cut the solid logo back to the build platform. You now have 2 separate solids. Select one, then click export and check "The selected shape". Repeat this for the other body. From here the process for doing a 2-color print varies from printer to printer, so I won’t go into detail on that. It generally involves importing both objects into your slicer and choosing a separate extruder for each object. Though this process is great for 2 color printers, you can omit the steps regarding the solid version of the logo if you don’t have a 2 color printer. You can print in a single color or use a color swap to create a 2 color print. Check out this video detailing color swaps on the Ender 3. The process is essentially identical for any printer. Color swaps are a great way to add a little color without needing to replace or upgrade your printer. Embossing a logo, text, or other design onto an object is a great way to add a little personalization and visual interest to an otherwise simple design. This process works best on flay or mostly flat objects, as the logo will be distorted by curves. 1 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Categories 6.7K All Categories 1K The Blog 34 What's Trending 164 How to & Technical Guides 10 Computer Hardware 119 Software 3 Home Office 6 Networking Audio/Visual 2 Home Automation 15 3D Printers 9 Maker 15 PC Build Guides 81 Reviews & Buying Guides 27 Build Showcase 13 Contests 35 Past Contests 819 The Community 1.7K General Discussion 105 New Members 86 Consumer Tech 26 Prebuilt PCs and Laptops 75 Software 2 Audio/Visual 12 Networking & Security 1 Home Automation 2 Digital Photography 3 Content Creators 21 Hobby Boards & Projects 23 3D Printing 49 Retro Arcade/Gaming 80 All Other Tech 1.2K Store Information and Policy 49 Off Topic 5 Community Ideas & Feedback 111 Your Completed Builds 2.6K Build-Your-Own PC 1.7K Help Choosing Parts 220 Graphics Cards 161 CPUs, Memory, and Motherboards 61 Cases and Power Supplies 19 Air and Liquid Cooling 13 Monitors and Displays 29 Peripherals 9 All Other Parts 21 Featured Categories We love seeing what our customers build Submit photos and a description of your PC to our build showcase Submit Now Looking for a little inspiration? See other custom PC builds and get some ideas for what can be done View Build Showcase View builds by: AMD Processors Intel Processors RTX 3090 RTX 3080 RTX 2080 Ti RTX 2080 Super RTX 2070 Super RTX 2070 RTX 2060 Super Radeon RX 5700XT Radeon RX 5700 Air Cooled Liquid Cooled SAME DAY CUSTOM BUILD SERVICE If You Can Dream it, We Can Build it. Services starting at $149.99 More Details Micro Center Homepage Desktops Laptops Computer Parts Computer Accessories Custom PC Builder Build Showcase Networking Electronics 3D Printing Service, Upgrades & Repairs Laptop Battery Replacement Laptop Screen Repair Virus and Malware Removal Hard Drive Recovery and Backup Apple MacBook Repair Custom Built PCs Schedule an Appointment © Vanilla Foundation Theme 2021 Powered By Vanilla Community Article How to change the Desktop Background in Windows 10 - Micro Center Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker {$smarty.capture.menu} Activity Categories Discussions Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker How to change the Desktop Background in Windows 10 - Micro Center This article will show how to change the desktop background for your Windows 10 PC. The background can be set to a single static image, a solid color, or a slideshow of various pictures on the computer. 1. Right click on the Start button, typically found at the lower left corner of the screen, then click on Settings. 2. From the Windows Settings screen that appears, click on Personalization. 3. From the Personalization Settings, click on Background. 4. Click the drop down box below Background and additional options will appear for how you can set up your desktop background. Click on Picture to use a single picture. Click Browse button to select any picture on the computer to use as the background. Click on Solid color to use a single color as the background. Click on Slideshow to use a group of pictures from a particular folder. Click the Browse button to choose a particular folder that will be used. Any pictures in the specified folder will be included in the slideshow. All changes will save automatically and may be changed between the options at any time. Was this article helpful? YesNo Be the first one to vote! © Vanilla Foundation Theme 2021 Powered By Vanilla Community Article How to use Display Calibration on Mac OS - Micro Center Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker {$smarty.capture.menu} Activity Categories Discussions Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker How to use Display Calibration on Mac OS - Micro Center An article on how to use the Display Calibration on the Mac OS. This article includes both Normal and Expert calibration steps. 1)  Open the Apple menu and select System Preferences. 2)  In System Preferences, open Display. 3)  In Display, click on the Color tab. Normal Display Calibration 1)  Click on the Calibrate button. 2)  On the Introduction page for the Display Calibrator Assistant, click Continue. 3)  The first setting you will see is Select a target white point, which controls the overall tint of the screen. To manually adjust the slider, uncheck Use native white point. Going lower will make the tint more yellow while going higher will make the tint more blue. Once you have chosen your white point, click on Continue. 4)  Next, you will see the Administration options. This will give you to choose if you want to allow any other user to use the calibration you make. If you want to, click on the box to check it. Otherwise, proceed with Continue. 5)  You will have the option go Give the profile a name from here, give it any name you want and Continue. 6)  You will now see the Conclusion which gives you the profile summary information about the calibration you have put together. When finished, click on Done. 7)  You will return to the previous Display window, the profile you created will now display in the list.   Expert Mode Display Calibration 1)  On the Color tab, hold down the Option key and then click on Calibrate to enter the display calibration in Expert Mode.   2)  On the Introduction page, you will see a box for Expert mode. Ensure the box is checked and click Continue. 3)  The first setting you can adjust is the Native gamma for the native luminance response curve. Follow the instructions on the page and adjust both the vertical bar on the left and the crossbar on the right to adjust the settings. This will have to be repeated for five different forms of Native gamma. 4)  Next is the Target gamma, which controls the overall contrast on the screen. You can see a box for Use native gamma on this display already checked. If you wish to change this, uncheck the box and move the slider. If you slide it lower, the contrast will be brighter, while sliding it higher will darken the contrast. 5)  You will then Select a target white point, where you can change the overall color tint of the screen. 6)  You will next see the Administrator options, allowing to choose if other users on the computer can see this calibration and use it. 7)  Next you will be able to Give the profile a name. 8)  Now you will see the Conclusion of the calibration with the information shown. Once you are done click on Done.   9)  You will be at the Color tab of the Display settings where you will see the new calibration listed under Display profile. You can select this calibration as needed. © Vanilla Foundation Theme 2021 Powered By Vanilla Community Article Gaming or Work: How to Choose the Best Monitor — Micro Center Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker {$smarty.capture.menu} Activity Categories Discussions Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker Home › Reviews & Buying Guides Gaming or Work: How to Choose the Best Monitor SeanM admin February 5 edited April 22 in Reviews & Buying Guides By Chuong Nguyen With the sheer number of monitors on the market, selecting the right one can be a daunting task. Whether you’re a gamer or if you live in Microsoft Office at your desk, we’ll help you with some key features to look out for when picking out your display. TN vs. IPS vs. VA vs. OLED – What Panel Type is Right For Me? There are several different screen technologies, ranging from OLED, IPS, TN, and VA, and each have their advantages and disadvantages. Traditionally, gamers often opted for TN, or Twisted Nematic, displays, which comes with fast refresh rates and response times in a more affordable package, especially when compared to IPS technology. The weakness with TN panels is that they often have poorer color support and viewing angles could be more limited. Still, TN panels offer an excellent and affordable solution for beginning gamers who need a monitor fast enough to keep up with the on-screen action. Office workers, on the other hand, historically chose IPS screens for color accuracy, but these screens are often expensive and sometimes come with slower response times. That said, technology has greatly improved over the past few years, and many gamers have opted for IPS screens. Along with a more affordable price today – AOC’s IPS monitor starts at just $109 – and support for refresh rates as fast as 240Hz or even 360Hz, IPS is becoming the de facto choice for many gamers who can’t afford a more premium OLED screen. AOC 24B2XH 23.8" What Size Monitor Do I Need? Gamers who want to see more of their games have a slew of options to get a larger view. The most direct approach is to choose the largest monitor you can afford. Alienware, for example, offers a pricy 55-inch 4K OLED gaming monitor that can essentially replace your living room television, but there are more manageable screens within the 20- or 30-inch range. Compared to IPS panels, OLED screens gain punchy and bright colors and the 120Hz refresh rate ensures you won’t miss the action. Often, gaming monitors bear the traditional 16:9 aspect ratio – a format derived from the 1080p display. If you choose a smaller 20- or 30-inch monitor, you can purchase a monitor stand to connect two or more monitors in a multi-monitor setup, giving you a wider, panoramic view. And when you’re taking time off from gaming, this setup is perfect for work, as multitaskers can spread open plenty of windows to cover both screens. For a truly immersive experience, the third option is an ultrawide screen. Given how large and wide the ultrawide screens can be, the displays often are curved to ensure that you’ll have corner-to-corner visibility. Panels like the Asus XG49VQ can reach 49 inches in diagonal. If you find yourself gaming on a monitor that was designed for productivity applications, chances are you’ll find that the screen itself is unable to keep pace with the action. For MMO gamers, this can really affect your gaming performance, with artifacts such as screen stutters, lags, and ghosting. ASUS XG49VQ 49" What is a Freesync Monitor? What does G Sync Mean? To get the best performance, you’ll want to find a display that best pairs with your graphics card. If you’re gaming on a Radeon GPU made by AMD, you’ll want to opt for a monitor that supports FreeSync technology, while GeForce gamers on Nvidia’s GPUs will want to find a G-Sync compatible monitor. FreeSync and G-Sync are adaptive screen sync technologies that work in similar ways to help smooth out the graphics on your screen. When you’re playing a game with a higher framerate than the refresh rate supported by your monitor, for example, you’ll see tearing and stuttering. Adaptive sync corrects this by handling the rendering and processing of the graphics, so images display smoothly. The 3 Rs of Gaming Monitors: Resolution, Refresh Rates, & Response Times After you’ve determined if you need a G-Sync or FreeSync display, you’ll want to check the three Rs of gaming displays – resolution, refresh rates, and response times. Most gamers will want to start with a 1080p monitor. Not only is this resolution the most affordable, but they’ll give you the best performance, even on more budget GPUs. If you have a more entry-level graphics card and try to play at 4K resolution, you’ll likely encounter a lot of dropped frames, making the experience horrible. That said, if you’re busting out with a top-of-the-line Nvidia GeForce RTX 3080 this year, then going 4K will give you a lot of flexibility for the future. The next thing to look out for is refresh rate. Refresh rate is critical in reducing lags and stutters on-screen, and you’ll want to find a monitor with a high refresh rate. In general, you’ll want a screen with a minimum 60Hz refresh rate, though 120Hz or higher is still recommended. Enthusiast gamers will want to go even higher with a 240Hz panel. When budget is a concern, there is a trade-off when it comes to resolution and refresh rates. Esports gamers need an extremely fast display and will want to stick to a 1080p or 1440p monitor with a high refresh rate.   Another key specification to look out for is response time. You’ll want a screen that can respond to changes quickly, so a faster response time is ideal. Together, these three Rs help to fight latency and lag. Acer’s 27-inch Predator XB271HY is a solid choice with its 165Hz refresh rate. This panel checks off a lot of items on the list and is priced at just $499. If you really want to go into overkill territory, the Predator X35 is a 35-inch monitor with QHD resolution, curved IPS LED display, and 180Hz refresh rate that sells for $1,799. Acer Predator XB271HU 27" HDR, Brightness, Color, & Contrast Both AMD and Nvidia have introduced real-time raytracing support into their GPUs, and game developers are leveraging this technology to render scenes in a game more realistically. Raytracing essentially allows a game to render, in real-time, how light is reflected, refracted, or absorbed onto various surfaces in a scene for cinematic effect. To take advantage of a game’s visuals – and draw detail and attention to the darkest of shadows – you’ll want a bright monitor that can support HDR. There are various DisplayHDR support levels, ranging from HDR400 to HDR1000, with the highest number being the best. HDR monitors help with contrast, support a wide dynamic range for life-like rendering, and are often brighter than monitors without HDR. If you’re playing games with a lot of dark scenes, HDR will help you spot the enemies in the shadows! Dell’s S3220DGF is an affordable 32-inch curved gaming monitor that supports HDR400 for just $449. Dell S3220DGF 32" Connectivity is King At CES 2021 this year, a new standard that’s emerging is the new HDMI 2.1 standard. The standard is ideal for gamers who like to switch between PC and console gaming, but you’ll need a monitor that supports HDMI 2.1. Because HDMI 2.1 supports more bandwidth over its cable, gamers no longer need to choose between resolution or fast refresh rates. The standard supports 4K resolution at up to 120fps or 8K content at 60fps. Along with dynamic HDR, support for variable refresh rate, and quick frame transport to reduce lag, gamers will find lots to love with this new standard. We found a handful of monitors with HDMI 2.1 announced at CES, but expect more to come soon!           1 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Leave a Comment Rich Text Editor. To edit a paragraph's style, hit tab to get to the paragraph menu. From there you will be able to pick one style. Nothing defaults to paragraph. An inline formatting menu will show up when you select text. Hit tab to get into that menu. Some elements, such as rich link embeds, images, loading indicators, and error messages may get inserted into the editor. You may navigate to these using the arrow keys inside of the editor and delete them with the delete or backspace key. Comment As ... Categories 6.7K All Categories 1K The Blog 34 What's Trending 164 How to & Technical Guides 10 Computer Hardware 119 Software 3 Home Office 6 Networking Audio/Visual 2 Home Automation 15 3D Printers 9 Maker 15 PC Build Guides 81 Reviews & Buying Guides 27 Build Showcase 13 Contests 35 Past Contests 819 The Community 1.7K General Discussion 105 New Members 86 Consumer Tech 26 Prebuilt PCs and Laptops 75 Software 2 Audio/Visual 12 Networking & Security 1 Home Automation 2 Digital Photography 3 Content Creators 21 Hobby Boards & Projects 23 3D Printing 49 Retro Arcade/Gaming 80 All Other Tech 1.2K Store Information and Policy 49 Off Topic 5 Community Ideas & Feedback 111 Your Completed Builds 2.6K Build-Your-Own PC 1.7K Help Choosing Parts 220 Graphics Cards 161 CPUs, Memory, and Motherboards 61 Cases and Power Supplies 19 Air and Liquid Cooling 13 Monitors and Displays 29 Peripherals 9 All Other Parts 21 Featured Categories We love seeing what our customers build Submit photos and a description of your PC to our build showcase Submit Now Looking for a little inspiration? See other custom PC builds and get some ideas for what can be done View Build Showcase View builds by: AMD Processors Intel Processors RTX 3090 RTX 3080 RTX 2080 Ti RTX 2080 Super RTX 2070 Super RTX 2070 RTX 2060 Super Radeon RX 5700XT Radeon RX 5700 Air Cooled Liquid Cooled SAME DAY CUSTOM BUILD SERVICE If You Can Dream it, We Can Build it. Services starting at $149.99 More Details Micro Center Homepage Desktops Laptops Computer Parts Computer Accessories Custom PC Builder Build Showcase Networking Electronics 3D Printing Service, Upgrades & Repairs Laptop Battery Replacement Laptop Screen Repair Virus and Malware Removal Hard Drive Recovery and Backup Apple MacBook Repair Custom Built PCs Schedule an Appointment © Vanilla Foundation Theme 2021 Powered By Vanilla Community Article RGB: Yes or No? — Micro Center Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker {$smarty.capture.menu} Activity Categories Discussions Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker Home › General Discussion RGB: Yes or No? SeanM admin February 10 edited June 16 in General Discussion It's a simple question, recently reignited by PC Gamer's resharing of their 2017 article saying that Gaming Hardware Needs to Grow Up. Today, they came back to say that Every One of RGB's 16.8M Colours Has a Place in Gaming hardware. So what do you think? Is RGB essential to every build, or are you left looking for something that doesn't look like it can cut you with all those hard edges and colors? RGB: Yes or No? Yes! RGB is essential to any build No! Give me that sleek and simple look Eh! It's fine in moderation Other! Comment below Sign in to vote! This is a public poll: others will see what you voted for. RGB: Yes or No? 11 votes Yes! RGB is essential to any build 45% 5 votes No! Give me that sleek and simple look 27% 3 votes Eh! It's fine in moderation 27% 3 votes Other! Comment below 0% Hide Results 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Comments SeanM admin February 10 No! Give me that sleek and simple look I'm going to come out swinging: I like my computers simple. Sure, my Mouse and Keyboard are littered with RGB, but that's not why I bought them. My case is matte black with no external lighting and no windows. My graphics card has RGB on it, but I have no idea what I set it to, it's been so long since I've looked inside my case while my computer was running. But - there is something stunning about those sleek, one-or-two color builds like Doom over here, so I guess it can stick around. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook djohnson2 admin February 11 Yes! RGB is essential to any build Lighting in general makes a room feel 100 times better. So why not add it to your PC. My build tends to change colors with my moods - or when I need more performance... 😂 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Ian admin February 12 Eh! It's fine in moderation Yes and no for me, I have it but it just kinda came with all the parts I bought. Although I enjoy an RGB keyboard but just to make it all white. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook TSPhillipT admin February 12 Yes! RGB is essential to any build RGB always. Big Corsair Fanboy here, RGB is my life and I usually plan my builds around at least a decent amount of RGB. I do prefer nonrainbow and addressable RGB patterns. I think rainbow in general isn't the most appealing but color schemes is the main reason why I am super into RGB. I do seasonal color changes for my setup usually. I have everything from LED Strips in my case to LED strips on the back of my monitor and a set of Nanoleafs as well. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Paul_2 ✭ February 20 No! Give me that sleek and simple look I also like Corsair for their mechanical keyboards and high DPI mice, etc ... The RGB there, and it's cool for a minute, but I end up ignoring it after that. For the cases, I don't mind a couple LEDs but they need to be a solid color that matches the non-RGB tower color scheme. I often nap or sleep on the couch in my office so too many RGB lights, especially if they are actively changing the color inhibits my sleeping. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Categories 6.7K All Categories 1K The Blog 34 What's Trending 164 How to & Technical Guides 10 Computer Hardware 119 Software 3 Home Office 6 Networking Audio/Visual 2 Home Automation 15 3D Printers 9 Maker 15 PC Build Guides 81 Reviews & Buying Guides 27 Build Showcase 13 Contests 35 Past Contests 818 The Community 1.7K General Discussion 105 New Members 86 Consumer Tech 26 Prebuilt PCs and Laptops 75 Software 2 Audio/Visual 12 Networking & Security 1 Home Automation 2 Digital Photography 3 Content Creators 21 Hobby Boards & Projects 23 3D Printing 49 Retro Arcade/Gaming 80 All Other Tech 1.2K Store Information and Policy 49 Off Topic 5 Community Ideas & Feedback 111 Your Completed Builds 2.6K Build-Your-Own PC 1.7K Help Choosing Parts 220 Graphics Cards 161 CPUs, Memory, and Motherboards 61 Cases and Power Supplies 19 Air and Liquid Cooling 13 Monitors and Displays 28 Peripherals 9 All Other Parts 21 Featured Categories We love seeing what our customers build Submit photos and a description of your PC to our build showcase Submit Now Looking for a little inspiration? See other custom PC builds and get some ideas for what can be done View Build Showcase View builds by: AMD Processors Intel Processors RTX 3090 RTX 3080 RTX 2080 Ti RTX 2080 Super RTX 2070 Super RTX 2070 RTX 2060 Super Radeon RX 5700XT Radeon RX 5700 Air Cooled Liquid Cooled SAME DAY CUSTOM BUILD SERVICE If You Can Dream it, We Can Build it. Services starting at $149.99 More Details Micro Center Homepage Desktops Laptops Computer Parts Computer Accessories Custom PC Builder Build Showcase Networking Electronics 3D Printing Service, Upgrades & Repairs Laptop Battery Replacement Laptop Screen Repair Virus and Malware Removal Hard Drive Recovery and Backup Apple MacBook Repair Custom Built PCs Schedule an Appointment © Vanilla Foundation Theme 2021 Powered By Vanilla Community Article How to fix a Monitor with a Yellow Tint - Micro Center Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker {$smarty.capture.menu} Activity Categories Discussions Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker How to fix a Monitor with a Yellow Tint - Micro Center If you're having a yellow tint issue with your monitor on your Windows PC, give these steps a try to remove the yellow tint from a monitor. Here is how to do this: 1. Open Control Panel by pressing the Windows key on your keyboard and tapping the letter X. Then click on Search from the list of options. In the search bar, type in Control Panel and click on it from the results to open it up. 2. In the top left corner of the Control Panel, type Color Management. In the list of results, click Color Management. 3. In the device drop-down menu, choose the monitor that has the yellow tint. 4. Check the Use my settings for this device box. Click Add. 5. Choose sRGB Virtual Device Model Profile, then click OK. 6. Left click on the new profile you just added, then click Set as Default Profile. Click Close to exit this window. © Vanilla Foundation Theme 2021 Powered By Vanilla Community Article Overview of USB Standards, Connections and Functions - Micro Center Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker {$smarty.capture.menu} Activity Categories Discussions Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker Overview of USB Standards, Connections and Functions - Micro Center This article will provide general information and history about USB standards as well as different types of USB connections. USB stands for Universal Serial Bus and is used in connections, communication, and to supply power. USB has had 4 major releases since it was first introduced into the market, as well as some minor adaptations around those releases. USB ports and cables can be identified by the USB symbol pictured below. There are a couple of key points to understand about USB: USB Releases, as outlined below, have to do with speed and specifications.  Types of USB Connections, outlined later on this page, have to do with the physical connections, shapes, and sizes of the USB cables and ports. Some USB Connections and some USB Releases cross over with each other throughout the overall timeline of USB technology to offer the best selection of features, functions, and benefits. USB Releases USB 4.0 Specifications Announced 2019, but not widely available as of the writing of this article (May 2021) Also known as SuperSpeed+ and based on Thunderbolt protocols Speeds up to 40Gb/s using certified cables USB 4.0 ports and connectors are typically of the Type C variety Backwards compatibility with USB 3.2, USB 2.0, and Thunderbolt 3 is supported USB 3.2 Released 2017 Also known as USB SuperSpeed+ Speeds up to 20Gb/s using certified USB cables USB 3.2 ports and connectors are typically of the Type C variety Variations include Gen 1x2 (10 Gb/s) and Gen 2x2 (20 Gb/s) USB 3.1 Released 2013 Also known as SuperSpeed+ Speeds up to 10Gb/s USB 3.1 ports and connectors are often color-coded Teal or Blue USB 3.1 ports and connectors can be of Type A, Type B, or Type C variety Variations include Gen 2 (10 Gb/s), later referred to as 3.2 Gen 1x1 USB 3.0 Released 2008 Also known as SuperSpeed USB Speeds up to 5Gb/s USB 3.0 ports and connectors are often color-coded Teal or Blue Generally backwards compatible with USB 2.0 at the slower speed USB 3.0 ports and connectors can be of Type A, Type B, or Type C variety as well as a Micro B SuperSpeed variation Variations later referred to as 3.1 Gen 1 and 3.2 Gen 1x1 USB 2.x Released 2000 Also known as High Speed USB Speeds can be 480 Mbit/s, but due to overhead effective speeds are 35 MB/s or 280 Mbit/s USB 2 ports and connectors are often color-coded either black or white Generally backwards compatible with USB 1.x at the slower speed, and USB 3.x at a slower speed USB 2.x ports and connectors can be of Type A, Type B, or Type C variety USB 2.x ports and connectors can also be of the Type Mini A, Mini B, Mini AB, Micro A, Micro B, or Micro AB variety USB 1.x (now considered obsolete) Released 1996, updated 1998 Also known as Low Speed USB and Full Speed USB Speeds are 1.5 Mbit/s (Low Bandwidth or Low Speed) and 12 Mbit/s (Full Bandwidth or Full Speed) USB 1.x ports and connectors are often color-coded either black or white Works with USB 2.x but at the lower speed USB 1.x ports and connectors can be of the Type A or Type B Types of USB Connections Type A Designed to be connected to a host device, such as a desktop or game console. Type B Designed for peripherals. For example, printers will have a USB Type-B connector most of the time. Mini and Micro The various mini and micro connections are used in various smaller devices such as cell phones and digital cameras. Mini-USB connectors will mostly be found on older portable devices but are becoming obsolete. Micro-USB is a very popular USB connection for portable devices. Type C The newest connection for USB is USB Type-C. Type-C is meant to replace previous connection types with a single connection. Support for up to USB 4.0 with speeds up to 40GB/s Compatible with 3.0 and 2.0 with the use of adapters Power output of 20V(100W) and 5A. This will allow future laptops to be USB powered Bi-directional power so a peripheral device could power the host No up or down position. No more flipping the cable around to find the right position USB Technologies and Functions USB On The Go / USB OTG OTG was released in 2001 and enables USB devices to communicate with one another. For example, a smartphone can read directly from a USB flash drive instead of having to go through a desktop to transfer the data. Both devices can act as a host or peripheral so that the data sharing can work both ways Does not work through a standard hub Device needs to be OTG compatible and use an OTG cable May need to download a file manager app to fully utilize all features USB Sleep and Charge Sleep or Charge ports do not turn off during sleep or standby modes on computers, unlike normal USB ports, which will disable when the computer is asleep. Mostly color coded Yellow or Red May be identified differently depending on the computer manufacturer May need to be enabled on the computer May also have a lightning bolt next to the USB symbol USB Data Transfer Cable Enables a user to transfer data from one computer to another, which a standard USB cable will not. These are not very widespread because there are easier ways to do this, such as a home network, flash drive, or Ethernet crossover cable. © Vanilla Foundation Theme 2021 Powered By Vanilla Community Article Cancel Order #11606221 — Micro Center Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker {$smarty.capture.menu} Activity Categories Discussions Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker Home › Store Information and Policy Cancel Order #11606221 Cc2992 ✭ December 2020 edited December 2020 in Store Information and Policy Hi, I made an order online yesterday but realized I ordered the wrong color and would like to cancel it.  0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Comments Ian admin December 2020 Cc2992 said: Hi, I made an order online yesterday but realized I ordered the wrong color and would like to cancel it.  I just created a ticket to get that order canceled for you. We will do our best to cancel that before it ships. Let us know if you need help with anything else. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Cc2992 ✭ December 2020 Ian said: Cc2992 said: Hi, I made an order online yesterday but realized I ordered the wrong color and would like to cancel it.  I just created a ticket to get that order canceled for you. We will do our best to cancel that before it ships. Let us know if you need help with anything else. Thank you! Will I get an email confirmation or other verification that it’s been cancelled to know for sure? 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook TSPhillipT admin December 2020 Yes, you will receive an email as soon as that cancellation gets approved.   1 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Categories 6.7K All Categories 1K The Blog 33 What's Trending 164 How to & Technical Guides 10 Computer Hardware 119 Software 3 Home Office 6 Networking Audio/Visual 2 Home Automation 15 3D Printers 9 Maker 15 PC Build Guides 81 Reviews & Buying Guides 27 Build Showcase 13 Contests 35 Past Contests 816 The Community 1.7K General Discussion 105 New Members 85 Consumer Tech 26 Prebuilt PCs and Laptops 75 Software 2 Audio/Visual 12 Networking & Security 1 Home Automation 2 Digital Photography 3 Content Creators 21 Hobby Boards & Projects 23 3D Printing 49 Retro Arcade/Gaming 79 All Other Tech 1.2K Store Information and Policy 49 Off Topic 5 Community Ideas & Feedback 111 Your Completed Builds 2.6K Build-Your-Own PC 1.7K Help Choosing Parts 220 Graphics Cards 161 CPUs, Memory, and Motherboards 61 Cases and Power Supplies 19 Air and Liquid Cooling 13 Monitors and Displays 28 Peripherals 9 All Other Parts 21 Featured Categories We love seeing what our customers build Submit photos and a description of your PC to our build showcase Submit Now Looking for a little inspiration? See other custom PC builds and get some ideas for what can be done View Build Showcase View builds by: AMD Processors Intel Processors RTX 3090 RTX 3080 RTX 2080 Ti RTX 2080 Super RTX 2070 Super RTX 2070 RTX 2060 Super Radeon RX 5700XT Radeon RX 5700 Air Cooled Liquid Cooled SAME DAY CUSTOM BUILD SERVICE If You Can Dream it, We Can Build it. Services starting at $149.99 More Details Micro Center Homepage Desktops Laptops Computer Parts Computer Accessories Custom PC Builder Build Showcase Networking Electronics 3D Printing Service, Upgrades & Repairs Laptop Battery Replacement Laptop Screen Repair Virus and Malware Removal Hard Drive Recovery and Backup Apple MacBook Repair Custom Built PCs Schedule an Appointment © Vanilla Foundation Theme 2021 Powered By Vanilla