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Community Article Help identifying graphics card — Micro Center Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker {$smarty.capture.menu} Activity Categories Discussions Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker Home › General Discussion Help identifying graphics card mstark ✭ December 2020 edited June 7 in General Discussion I was in store yesterday and got a recommendation on a graphics card - "1660 Graphix" or "1660 Nvidia" for $219. I can't find that on the site now. Can anyone point me to more detail on what this is? 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Comments Ian admin December 2020 mstark said: I was in store yesterday and got a recommendation on a graphics card - "1660 Graphix" or "1660 Nvidia" for $219. I can't find that on the site now. Can anyone point me to more detail on what this is? Sounds like they'd be referring to a GTX 1660 - store stock is going to be very limited, if in stock at all at this time. https://www.microcenter.com/search/search_results.aspx?N=0&NTT=1660&NTK=all&sortby=pricelow Select your local Micro Center at the top of the page and you can view their stock. Store stock is updated regularly during business hours online.  1 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook mstark ✭ December 2020 Ian said: mstark said: I was in store yesterday and got a recommendation on a graphics card - "1660 Graphix" or "1660 Nvidia" for $219. I can't find that on the site now. Can anyone point me to more detail on what this is? Sounds like they'd be referring to a GTX 1660 - store stock is going to be very limited, if in stock at all at this time. https://www.microcenter.com/search/search_results.aspx?N=0&NTT=1660&NTK=all&sortby=pricelow Select your local Micro Center at the top of the page and you can view their stock. Store stock is updated regularly during business hours online.  Thanks for this. At least I know what we need. Looks like its out of stock. Any thoughts on a compatible graphics card for around $220? Thanks again for taking the time to reply. 1 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Ian admin December 2020 mstark said: Ian said: mstark said: I was in store yesterday and got a recommendation on a graphics card - "1660 Graphix" or "1660 Nvidia" for $219. I can't find that on the site now. Can anyone point me to more detail on what this is? Sounds like they'd be referring to a GTX 1660 - store stock is going to be very limited, if in stock at all at this time. https://www.microcenter.com/search/search_results.aspx?N=0&NTT=1660&NTK=all&sortby=pricelow Select your local Micro Center at the top of the page and you can view their stock. Store stock is updated regularly during business hours online.  Thanks for this. At least I know what we need. Looks like its out of stock. Any thoughts on a compatible graphics card for around $220? Thanks again for taking the time to reply. Video cards are extremely limited at this time, which Micro Center store are you nearest to?  0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook mstark ✭ December 2020 Cambridge.... 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook TSTDavey admin December 2020 @mstark just chiming in. There is a industry wide graphic card shortage so its very difficult for retailers to stock graphic cards. A comparable graphic card to the GTX 1660 Super would be the AMD Radeon RX 5500 XT or the Radeon RX 590 to just the GTX 1660 (non super). You can keep checking our website for if we have any of these graphic cards in stock or check newegg or amazon. Amazon has some of the 1660 online, you could also look at the GTX 1650 as well. Good luck 1 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook mstark ✭ January 3 Thank you! 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Categories 7K All Categories 1.1K The Blog 37 What's Trending 167 How to & Technical Guides 11 Computer Hardware 119 Software 3 Home Office 6 Networking Audio/Visual 2 Home Automation 16 3D Printers 10 Maker 16 PC Build Guides 96 Reviews & Buying Guides 34 Build Showcase 17 Contests 39 Past Contests 1K The Community 1.8K General Discussion 84 New Members 127 Consumer Tech 42 Prebuilt PCs and Laptops 78 Software 4 Audio/Visual 13 Networking & Security 1 Home Automation 2 Digital Photography 3 Content Creators 22 Hobby Boards & Projects 26 3D Printing 53 Retro Arcade/Gaming 86 All Other Tech 1.4K Store Information and Policy 52 Off Topic 6 Community Ideas & Feedback 114 Your Completed Builds 2.7K Build-Your-Own PC 1.7K Help Choosing Parts 227 Graphics Cards 175 CPUs, Memory, and Motherboards 63 Cases and Power Supplies 19 Air and Liquid Cooling 17 Monitors and Displays 30 Peripherals 10 All Other Parts 23 Featured Categories We love seeing what our customers build Submit photos and a description of your PC to our build showcase Submit Now Looking for a little inspiration? See other custom PC builds and get some ideas for what can be done View Build Showcase View builds by: AMD Processors Intel Processors RTX 3090 RTX 3080 RTX 2080 Ti RTX 2080 Super RTX 2070 Super RTX 2070 RTX 2060 Super Radeon RX 5700XT Radeon RX 5700 Air Cooled Liquid Cooled SAME DAY CUSTOM BUILD SERVICE If You Can Dream it, We Can Build it. Services starting at $149.99 More Details Micro Center Homepage Desktops Laptops Computer Parts Computer Accessories Custom PC Builder Build Showcase Networking Electronics 3D Printing Service, Upgrades & Repairs Laptop Battery Replacement Laptop Screen Repair Virus and Malware Removal Hard Drive Recovery and Backup Apple MacBook Repair Custom Built PCs Schedule an Appointment © Vanilla Foundation Theme 2021 Powered By Vanilla Community Article Help me out with my first build! (~650€, Germany) — Micro Center Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker {$smarty.capture.menu} Activity Categories Discussions Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker Home › Help Choosing Parts Help me out with my first build! (~650€, Germany) Hallohannes Germany ✭ April 11 edited April 11 in Help Choosing Parts Hey everyone, Thanks for helping me out. My old laptop is not doing it anymore, I need a PC. - Budget: 650€ - Location: Germany - Use (gaming, rendering, etc): Gaming, working - Peripherals required (monitor, keyboard/mouse, etc): no - Operating System required: no I am not sure what to look out for when buying a PC. Espacially I need assistance with buying a compatible case and motherboard. I will use the pc to play some, partially quite demanding games, with my friends. Disclaimer: I don't need to be able to play Cyberpunk at max settings, I'm fine with running low settings as long as the experience is fluid so I can enjoy the time with my friends. My Dad got a new PC and I kept his GTX 750. I could use that and get a new GPU around christmas if that helps with maxing out my build and/or with the current GPU shortage. I would also be willing to buy used parts if it gives me better performance. I want to be able to upgrade later as well. This will me my first build, so if you have any important tips/guides that will help me NOT mess up while building, tell me please :) If any of you would take their time to advice me with what parts to buy, what options I have and giving tips, I would be really happy! (Also I know that some parts aren't avalable in Germany that would be in the USA, but I'll just look for similair alternatives) I like ssd's. If I use my GTX 570, what could I upgrade from this?: https://de.pcpartpicker.com/list/Rb69ZZ 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Comments Ian admin April 12 Hello, the parts you have picked out there with the budget you have look fine to me. Really not much we can recommend to change at that price point. Your motherboard and case that you have picked out are compatible so that's not an issue. Here is some information on building a gaming PC; https://community.microcenter.com/discussion/5025/how-to-build-a-gaming-pc 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook EMi_Comps ✭ April 13 @Hallohannes , Your selection from PCPartpicker.com is a standard build for the AMD Ryzen Platform. If, you are reusing a video card that is over 10 years old, for the GTX 570 and the GTX 750 is from 2014. both cards are listed as 1024MB (1GB GDDR 4 /5) cards. Gaming on either of these cards will be a nightmare, and your processor will feed it to much information, creating stuttering and tearing, as a result, and thus leading to crashes. While Nvidia does have modern driver from Windows 7,8, and 10 for these cards. Game play will be a bad experience. Your case and motherboard selection are fully compatible, and you should have no issue installing the motherboard, as the case is a ATX Mid-Tower and the board selected is a M-ATX form factor. Middle size of the ATX form factors. E-ATX = largest ATX = second largest M-ATX = Micro ATX = Third largest <---- This is your board. I-ATX or ITX = Smallest of the ATX form factor. German Translation: Ihre Auswahl aus PCPartpicker.com ist ein Standard-Build für die AMD Ryzen Platform. Wenn Sie eine Grafikkarte wiederverwenden, die älter als 10 Jahre ist, ist für die GTX 570 und die GTX 750 aus dem Jahr 2014. Beide Karten sind als 1024MB (1GB GDDR 4 /5) Karten aufgeführt. Gaming auf einer dieser Karten wird ein Alptraum sein, und Ihr Prozessor wird es zu vielen Informationen füttern, was stottern und reißen, als Ergebnis, und damit zu Abstürzen führen. Während Nvidia hat moderne Treiber von Windows 7,8, und 10 für diese Karten. Das Spiel wird eine schlechte Erfahrung sein. Ihre Fall- und Motherboardauswahl ist vollständig kompatibel, und Sie sollten kein Problem bei der Installation der Hauptplatine haben, da es sich um einen ATX Mid-Tower handelt und das ausgewählte Board ein M-ATX-Formfaktor ist. Mittlere Größe der ATX-Formfaktoren. E-ATX = größter ATX = zweitgrößter M-ATX = Micro ATX = Drittgrößter <---- Dies ist Ihr Board. I-ATX oder ITX = Kleinster ATX-Formfaktor. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Categories 7K All Categories 1.1K The Blog 38 What's Trending 167 How to & Technical Guides 11 Computer Hardware 119 Software 3 Home Office 6 Networking Audio/Visual 2 Home Automation 16 3D Printers 10 Maker 16 PC Build Guides 96 Reviews & Buying Guides 34 Build Showcase 17 Contests 39 Past Contests 1K The Community 1.8K General Discussion 84 New Members 127 Consumer Tech 42 Prebuilt PCs and Laptops 78 Software 4 Audio/Visual 13 Networking & Security 1 Home Automation 2 Digital Photography 3 Content Creators 22 Hobby Boards & Projects 26 3D Printing 53 Retro Arcade/Gaming 86 All Other Tech 1.4K Store Information and Policy 52 Off Topic 6 Community Ideas & Feedback 114 Your Completed Builds 2.7K Build-Your-Own PC 1.7K Help Choosing Parts 227 Graphics Cards 175 CPUs, Memory, and Motherboards 63 Cases and Power Supplies 19 Air and Liquid Cooling 17 Monitors and Displays 30 Peripherals 10 All Other Parts 23 Featured Categories We love seeing what our customers build Submit photos and a description of your PC to our build showcase Submit Now Looking for a little inspiration? See other custom PC builds and get some ideas for what can be done View Build Showcase View builds by: AMD Processors Intel Processors RTX 3090 RTX 3080 RTX 2080 Ti RTX 2080 Super RTX 2070 Super RTX 2070 RTX 2060 Super Radeon RX 5700XT Radeon RX 5700 Air Cooled Liquid Cooled SAME DAY CUSTOM BUILD SERVICE If You Can Dream it, We Can Build it. Services starting at $149.99 More Details Micro Center Homepage Desktops Laptops Computer Parts Computer Accessories Custom PC Builder Build Showcase Networking Electronics 3D Printing Service, Upgrades & Repairs Laptop Battery Replacement Laptop Screen Repair Virus and Malware Removal Hard Drive Recovery and Backup Apple MacBook Repair Custom Built PCs Schedule an Appointment © Vanilla Foundation Theme 2021 Powered By Vanilla Community Article Need help finding graphics card — Micro Center Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker {$smarty.capture.menu} Activity Categories Discussions Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker Home › Help Choosing Parts Need help finding graphics card DrySoup ✭ March 8 in Help Choosing Parts I was wondering if anyone knew where i can get a GTX 1650 super TUF or any other type of graphics card good for a budget build. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Comments TSTDavey admin March 8 Hello @DrySoup and thanks for posting on the Microcenter Community Forum. You probably are aware there is a shortage on GPUs. Its a challenge for any local retailer to keep cards stocked. You can definitely get a GTX 1650 Super Tuf from online at Amazon or Newegg, unfortunately they are sold at a premium. They are going for at least $300 more than what local retailers (ex., Microcenter) are selling them for. But you can get one from online. If want to have a chance of getting a 1650 or any GPU from Microcenter (MC), you have to join the competition. Customers are showing up at the store 1-2 hours before it opens to have a chance to enter to the store. GPUs are sold on a first come first sold bases. Once in the store customers are inquiring on if a inventory truck is coming that day and if so, customers hang out at the store until it comes with the hopes of purchasing a GPU. Customers are visiting the store pretty much everyday. Other community users on here can probably chime in on what days they went. I remember seeing a post of a customer going on Thursday, Friday and Saturday and was able to get a 3000 series card on Saturday. I forget what store that was. But, just information on how customers are obtaining GPUs from Microcenter. Other cards to look at and can be found online at a reasonable price is the GTX 1050 TI, which can support 4K or take a look at the GTX 1080 card as well. Good luck 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Categories 7K All Categories 1.1K The Blog 38 What's Trending 167 How to & Technical Guides 11 Computer Hardware 119 Software 3 Home Office 6 Networking Audio/Visual 2 Home Automation 16 3D Printers 10 Maker 16 PC Build Guides 96 Reviews & Buying Guides 34 Build Showcase 17 Contests 39 Past Contests 1K The Community 1.8K General Discussion 84 New Members 127 Consumer Tech 42 Prebuilt PCs and Laptops 78 Software 4 Audio/Visual 13 Networking & Security 1 Home Automation 2 Digital Photography 3 Content Creators 22 Hobby Boards & Projects 26 3D Printing 53 Retro Arcade/Gaming 86 All Other Tech 1.4K Store Information and Policy 52 Off Topic 6 Community Ideas & Feedback 114 Your Completed Builds 2.7K Build-Your-Own PC 1.7K Help Choosing Parts 227 Graphics Cards 175 CPUs, Memory, and Motherboards 63 Cases and Power Supplies 19 Air and Liquid Cooling 17 Monitors and Displays 30 Peripherals 10 All Other Parts 23 Featured Categories We love seeing what our customers build Submit photos and a description of your PC to our build showcase Submit Now Looking for a little inspiration? See other custom PC builds and get some ideas for what can be done View Build Showcase View builds by: AMD Processors Intel Processors RTX 3090 RTX 3080 RTX 2080 Ti RTX 2080 Super RTX 2070 Super RTX 2070 RTX 2060 Super Radeon RX 5700XT Radeon RX 5700 Air Cooled Liquid Cooled SAME DAY CUSTOM BUILD SERVICE If You Can Dream it, We Can Build it. Services starting at $149.99 More Details Micro Center Homepage Desktops Laptops Computer Parts Computer Accessories Custom PC Builder Build Showcase Networking Electronics 3D Printing Service, Upgrades & Repairs Laptop Battery Replacement Laptop Screen Repair Virus and Malware Removal Hard Drive Recovery and Backup Apple MacBook Repair Custom Built PCs Schedule an Appointment © Vanilla Foundation Theme 2021 Powered By Vanilla Community Article Tell us about your first build! — Micro Center Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker {$smarty.capture.menu} Activity Categories Discussions Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker Home › General Discussion Tell us about your first build! SeanM admin December 2020 edited June 16 in General Discussion Welcome to Micro Center Asks! We’ll be checking in fairly regularly with questions about the future, the past, and, of course, the now. This week, we’re introducing the first of our Micro Center Asks posts by asking about your first computer build! What went into it, what’d you do with it, and when did you retire it?   My first build was built for gaming, cobbled together from open boxes and sales over a few months while I scraped together the cash in college back in 2015. It’s technically still my main PC, but so much has been swapped out and upgraded, can I really call it the same PC? CPU: i7-4790K GPU: 660Ti Ram: 8 gigs of DDR3 OS: Windows 7 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Comments AlexS admin December 2020 Well my first "gaming" PC was an old Sony Vaio (2003-2008) Intel Pentium 4 3.0Ghz Single Core Processor 1GB of RAM ATI Radeon 9200 64MB (later upgraded to ATI Radeon 9550 256MB Video Card) - both AGP cards My first PC I built was composed of parts purchased from Micro Center (2015) and was around $750 CPU: AMD FX-6300 Mobo: ASRock AM3+ Board RAM: 8GB DDR3 Memory GPU: GTX 960 OS: Win 7 3 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Drag0nB0i ✭ December 2020 My First Ever PC that I have built was a fairly cheap (around $450) and not so powerful, but it still got the job done for everything I needed and hey, I was pretty proud of myself when I built it.  It consisted of: CPU: Intel i7 6700T GPU: A Hammydown GTX 1050Ti  Ram:  G.skill Aegis 8 Gigs DDR4 2133mhz PSU: Very sketchy XT Series 500W Mobo: Gigabyte H110M-A Storage: Western Digital 1TB HDD Case: Fractal Core 1000 To be honest, never go all out on your first ever PC build.  You should always start from the bottom, and make your way to the top.  Starting off with a slow PC made me really thankful for what I have now!   3 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Full_Medical Ohio ✭ December 2020 Ah yes, I remember when I finally gave up and built my first PC. It was a pretty fun machine to get going back in the day. I built it to run Windows 7 - but later turned it into a Hackintosh using Netkas' AMD kernel for OS X.  CPU: AMD Athlon II X3 Rana 425 @ 2.7Ghz RAM: 2 GB DDR2 GSKILL  MOBO: Gigabyte Mini ITX GPU: Nvidia GeForce 8200 PCI w/1Gb RAM HDD: 80GB Seagate IDE HDD The PSU and case were some HP pre-built home computer case and PSU that I salvaged to make into something better.  3 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook mcpeen NYC ✭ December 2020 My first pc was built in late 2014. After months of painstaking research and frustration trying to play Bioshock Infinite on my horrendously underpowered 2010 Macbook (I beat the game but it was a basically slideshow), I vowed that I would never scald my thighs with an aluminum laptop chassis ever again. I didn't know much about computers at the time, and now I have a home server (unRAID Plex server), a gaming pc for me, a pc for my wife, and lots of dusty, aged hardware that would likely be unattractive to secondhand market buyers.  It all started with my first build: CPU: AMD fx-8320 @ 3.5GHz MOBO:  Asus M5A97 LE 2.0 (full ATX)  RAM: 8GB (2x4GB kit) G.Skill Sniper DDR3-1866 HDD: 1TB WD Caviar Blue  GPU: Sapphire R9 280X Tri-X 3GB PSU: Rosewill ARC series 650W 80+ Bronze (definitely too much wattage for this build) CASE: NZXT Source 210 ATX Mid Tower I played a ton of games on this old beast (Bioshock Infinite at 60fps, Dying Light, Batman Arkham City, Portal 2, L4D2, CS:GO, etc.)  Over the years it incrementally became unrecognizable in a "grandfather's axe" kind of way; I'd add my first SSD, and a few months later realize I needed more RAM. If I'm upgrading my GPU to a newly released reference RX 480, perhaps I should try a new CPU, which would require a new motherboard... might as well get a new case while I'm at it...  This is what hardware addiction looks like.  I still live pretty close to a Micro Center, but my wife keeps an eye on the finances so I can't blow my paychecks in one trip like I used to.  3 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Ian admin December 2020 The first build I had would be about 2013-2014? I don't really recall too well. It had a FX-6350 processor, 8GB of RAM, and I believe a GTX 950. 3 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook shtiffee ✭ December 2020 I built my first computer spring semester of sophomore year in high school 2004 after starting a Comp TIA class. The only thing I can remember was it was a fully acrylic case with an ASUS Mobo, AMD Athlon 64, and tacky RGB strips.  This was back before they moved PSU's to the bottom of the case and the heat generated was crazy.  I upgraded that rig all the way through college until the MB finally gave out.  Lots of CS 1.6, CS: Source, Guild Wars, and Everquest were played on that thing.  It may still be on display at the computer shop I donated it to back in Texas.  Wish I had it as a showcase piece for my home.  I just built my most recent rig last year my first since my first build, 15 years ago.  It didn't feel as frustrating as I remember, still somewhat, but not as much. 3 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook TSPhillipT admin December 2020 edited December 2020 My first Gaming PC was a prebuilt one, the PowerSpec G426.  Prior to this, I was using some HP Prebuilt that I forgot the specs on.  The PowerSpec G426 had a: CPU: i7 6700k MB: ASRock Z170 Ram: 2x8Gb 3200Mhz GPU: MSI Gaming X GTX 1080 PSU: 750W 80+ Was a good build, but I noticed that most modern gaming PCs had a see through panel on the left side and I would love to be able to see my hardware.  So I looked into getting a new case and swapping things out.  I also noticed an issue for a capture card that it wasn't receiving power sometimes from the motherboard.  After realizing I need a new motherboard and a case, I decided to get a fully new build. My first full build is CPU: i9 9900k Cooling: Corsair H115 AIO Cooler MB: AORUS Ultra Z390 RAM: 4x8Gb Corsair Dominator Platinum 3200Mhz GPU: MSI Gaming X GTX 1080 -> ASUS ROG 2080 Super  PSU: Corsair RMx 850W Case: Corsair Obsidian 500D Special Edition Fans: another set of LL120s so I can match with the one that comes with the case. I later added more RGB to the build via the LED strips on the Corsair Lightning Node Pro. Build is still going strong and hasn't retired 2 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook MC-DM admin December 2020 edited December 2020 My first PC was done with mostly Micro Center components. A bit of an odd switch as I've always been a console gamer so I didn't need a PC (I used my laptop to browse online). I was/am still learning so no judgement pls. It honestly still works great! CPU: AMD Ryzen 5 1600  Mobo: MSI B350 TOMAHAWK AM4 ATX GPU: (Honestly, don't know, but can update when I find out) HDD: Toshiba P300 2TB  RAM: Corsair Vengeance LPX 16GB (2x8GB) DDR4 PSU: EVGA SuperNOVA 550 G2 Case: NZXT S340 Elite ATX Mid-Tower 3 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook dhunch ✭ December 2020 The first PC I built was several years ago, it was a 286 processor, and the memory was DIP,  the small 20 pin chips that you stuck on the mother board. But my first PC was a Tandy 2000 in the mid 80s.  The computer and a dot matrix printer and a daisy wheel printer costs $9500.00.  A box of 5 ¼ floppy disks  cost 120 for 12.  3 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Stefano238 ✭ December 2020 I don't have my full part list, but do remember it was about 8 years ago. I believe I had an i5-3rd gen processor, 8GB of DDR3 RAM, a Corsair case and a terrible GPU I stripped out of my parent's old HP prebuilt from around 2007. Luckily about 2 years later I upgraded my build to a 5th gen i5, 24GB of RAM(yes 24GB, it ran very well) and I replaced the terrible GPU I had with a 980ti. Also stepped up the PSU up to a Corsair AX650w. I just retired this system in January of this year. 2 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook BananaCultLeader ✭ December 2020 edited December 2020 My first PC that i had was just last year. Intel i5-4960k  Asus gtx 970 turbo 16GB DDR3 Now i have upgraded the CPU to an i7-4790, and a Nvidia gtx 1660ti. waiting to get the 3060ti 1 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook TSTonyV admin December 2020 edited December 2020 The very first PC I ever built, I very specifically built so I could play Battlefield 3 on high settings with decent framerate. I can't find the link anymore, but there was an article I read through and I followed it exactly.  MSI GTX 560 Intel i5-2500k MSI P67A-G45 8GB G.Skill Ripjaws DDR3-1600 RAM Cooler Master Masterwatt Lite 500W 80+ Bronze PSU Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO Antec 300 Illusion Black case  I got a good five years out of that build before I finally upgraded. I got a whole 40 FPS on Caspian Border in BF3 on High settings. Was able to overclock the 2500k to 4.3GHz with ease on that Hyper 212.  I still have all those parts actually.  2 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook TS_Watthew admin December 2020 My first PC ever to have as my own was a PowerSpec that my parents purchase sometime in the 90's. Awe a 4GB HDD and Windows 98 First Edition Then we got high speed internet and we decided to get me an upgrade to a used Compaq DeskPro with Windows XP Home. Messes with that for awhile until the case power button had to be "replaced" multiple times. So I started looking at Micro Center to build one. My first PC I built was from Micro Center (2011-12) and was around $400 CPU: AMD FX-4100 Motherboard: Gigabyte AM3+ GA-78LMT RAM: 4GB DDR3 Memory GPU: NO GPU!!! Case: I don't remember exactly, I think a cheap ThermalTake Case PSU: Cheap PSU that came with the case Storage: 500GB HDD for boot and a 1TB for storage, later upgraded to my first SSD, a Toshiba 120GB SSD OS: Windows 7 Home 2 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook TS_HunterL admin December 2020 I've yet to do my own build just yet, but I'm in the process of doing one now! It's mostly going to be used for high end gaming - think Cyberpunk 2077 - and potentially some streaming, but also some CAD software and 3D printing purposes. I'm going for a space-like theme and will be using purple/blue/white LED's in an almost all black build. Ryzen 9 5900x ASUS X570 TUF Gaming Plus (WIFI) Gigabyte 3070 Aorus OC - Silver Gigabyte Aorus 1TB M.2 G.Skill Trident Z Royal 32GB G.Skill 850W 80 Plus Gold Fractal Design Meshify C - Black ASUS ROG Strix LC 240mm RGB water cooling 2 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook IWantPopeyesChicken ✭ December 2020 my first build was an oldie but a goodie CPU:Intel® Core™ i5-8400 Processor Mobo: ASUS B360M-A System Board Ram: 16GB Intel® Optane™ Memory + 4GB DRAM Hard Drive: No Brand 1TB 7200 RPM  GPU:NVIDIA GeForce® GTX 1050Ti PCI Express OS: WIN 10 2 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook PamNorde ✭ December 2020 Hello!   My first full build was back in ~2008.  It was in a chassis that looked like @Watthew, but the side was taken off and had an old pink box fan for "airflow"   CPU: AMD's triple-core Phenom II X3 (My friend helped turn into a quad core with some BIOS change) GPU: Radeon HD something... I think maybe 3650 or something like that.  Had a really cool 3D graphic on the box that looks like garbage today Mother:  Something akin to ketchup and mustard from BIOSTAR (I only know that because of BIOS screen) I think its A785G3, but I could be wrong My power supply was something I wouldn't wish on my worst enemy today.  I am confident it could burst into flames at any point... 2 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook TS_Watthew admin December 2020 @PamNorde I wish I had that case back. I want to do a new sleeper build in one. 1 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook LandShark admin December 2020 My first build full build was back in 2012. I'd upgraded the family computer to its limit and decided that it was time to build my own! Intel Core i7 3770K Ivy Bridge 3.5GHz LGA 1155 Boxed Processor EVGA GeForce GTX 660 Ti Superclocked+ ASUS P8Z77-V PRO LGA 1155 Z77 ATX Intel Motherboard WD Blue 1TB 7,200 RPM HDD Corsair Vengeance 8GB 2 x 4GB DDR3-1600 Corsair HX Series HX750 750 Watt Cooler Master CM Storm Trooper Full Tower Ugly as it was. It was mine, and I loved it! I did later cable manage it, but I can't seem to find any pics. In 2014 I upgraded the storage (120GB SSD) and RAM to 16GB and I also added a Corsair AIO! I also upgraded the GPU in 2016 to an EVGA GTX 1070 SC Gaming and then again in 2018 to an ASUS ROG STRIX GeForce GTX 1080 Ti Gaming OC. At the end of 2019, I built a whole new rig to get rid of that nasty CPU bottleneck. All in all, it was a great build that lasted over 6 years. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook WGossettt ✭ December 2020 My 1st computer build was n 1988. It was a Zenith PC, with Windows 95, 1GB RAM, 64KB HDD, and a "turbo switch" that made it jump from 4.77MHZ to 8MHz.  Since then I have built over 50 PCs, With all Windows versions since Windows 95. 1 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook SimiusV New York ✭ January 10 edited January 10 The first completely custom build was an Ivy Bridge PC. i5 3570k Maximus V Gene EVGA GTX 680 16gb G-Skill I still remember being in my college class refreshing the EVGA page trying to get that video card due to shortages (Though, nothing like it is now, this is horrendous). I also got a call form someone at EVGA needing to confirm my purchase info (I made sure he was legit, don't worry) because they only had a handful of cards per day and were making sure they weren't selling to scalpers. Before that, I had an HP tower that I stuck videos cards into haha. First an EVGA 8800GS (carry over), then an MSI GTS250. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Paul_2 ✭ February 1 edited February 1 My first aspirational / virtual builds were scouring through the Computer Shopper magazine (inch thick monthly catalog of mail order computer parts) in 1986, and building part lists for a 386 that I would then beg my mom for (I was only 9) without any success. My first upgrade, in 1990, was the RAM and hard-drive on my Magnavox Headstart 386sx. My first build was in 1996 around the cheaper then Intel, but compatible Cyrix 6x86. I honestly don't remember much of the specs, but it had the 3dfx voodoo graphics card, and it played Doom well, so I was happy! 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook TS_EmileC admin February 9 edited February 9 I can't even recall my first build as it was almost 15 years ago. It was an Intel i5 with 8gigs and would crash from Limewire downloads from ripping my favorite albums in the early 2000s. After having enough from the agonizing pain, I decided to build from scratch last year. B450 Tomahawk, 3600X, GT710 with 32GB of RAM G.SKill. 3060 coming soon! 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook termin ✭ February 25 My first build was kinda a a mess but nothing bad. Didn't have a complete thought or final mind of my build so kept returning things. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Capricorn1 Northern Virginia ✭ February 27 I'm not sure I recall all the details, but this is close: AMD K6-2 350Mhz CPU PC Chips Socket 7 motherboard (not great) Don't recall the original graphics card. Upgraded to an Nvidia GeForce3 Ti 200 (AGP) after a couple of years. I think it had a whole 1GB of SDRAM (maybe 2GB) One of the original Creative Sound Blaster audio cards (PCI probably) Some generic beige case I'm sure it had a PSU This was around 1999-2001 and lasted until about 2003 when I gave it to a friend. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Categories 7K All Categories 1.1K The Blog 37 What's Trending 167 How to & Technical Guides 11 Computer Hardware 119 Software 3 Home Office 6 Networking Audio/Visual 2 Home Automation 16 3D Printers 10 Maker 16 PC Build Guides 96 Reviews & Buying Guides 34 Build Showcase 17 Contests 39 Past Contests 1K The Community 1.8K General Discussion 84 New Members 127 Consumer Tech 42 Prebuilt PCs and Laptops 78 Software 4 Audio/Visual 13 Networking & Security 1 Home Automation 2 Digital Photography 3 Content Creators 22 Hobby Boards & Projects 26 3D Printing 53 Retro Arcade/Gaming 86 All Other Tech 1.4K Store Information and Policy 52 Off Topic 6 Community Ideas & Feedback 114 Your Completed Builds 2.7K Build-Your-Own PC 1.7K Help Choosing Parts 227 Graphics Cards 175 CPUs, Memory, and Motherboards 63 Cases and Power Supplies 19 Air and Liquid Cooling 17 Monitors and Displays 30 Peripherals 10 All Other Parts 23 Featured Categories We love seeing what our customers build Submit photos and a description of your PC to our build showcase Submit Now Looking for a little inspiration? See other custom PC builds and get some ideas for what can be done View Build Showcase View builds by: AMD Processors Intel Processors RTX 3090 RTX 3080 RTX 2080 Ti RTX 2080 Super RTX 2070 Super RTX 2070 RTX 2060 Super Radeon RX 5700XT Radeon RX 5700 Air Cooled Liquid Cooled SAME DAY CUSTOM BUILD SERVICE If You Can Dream it, We Can Build it. Services starting at $149.99 More Details Micro Center Homepage Desktops Laptops Computer Parts Computer Accessories Custom PC Builder Build Showcase Networking Electronics 3D Printing Service, Upgrades & Repairs Laptop Battery Replacement Laptop Screen Repair Virus and Malware Removal Hard Drive Recovery and Backup Apple MacBook Repair Custom Built PCs Schedule an Appointment © Vanilla Foundation Theme 2021 Powered By Vanilla Community Article Need Help Choosing Parts — Micro Center Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker {$smarty.capture.menu} Activity Categories Discussions Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker Home › Help Choosing Parts Need Help Choosing Parts rmm ✭ January 30 in Help Choosing Parts I put this parts list together and am looking for some advice. https://www.microcenter.com/site/content/custom-pc-builder.aspx?load=b2cd3f3a-f187-4749-9345-a3a5c2fd0e7b looking to do a budget build, if anyone has any tips on where i can save money and if this will be worth it let me know!  0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Comments Ian admin January 30 rmm said: I put this parts list together and am looking for some advice. https://www.microcenter.com/site/content/custom-pc-builder.aspx?load=b2cd3f3a-f187-4749-9345-a3a5c2fd0e7b looking to do a budget build, if anyone has any tips on where i can save money and if this will be worth it let me know!  Greetings. We can for sure look into this with you. What is your intended budget? 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook rmm ✭ January 31 I'm looking to keep it under $1,000. I would like to use it for software development, running virtual machines, and some gaming as well (Cold War, Cyberpunk). 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook TSMikeW admin January 31 @rmm You did pretty well with the build. I'd swap the RAM for this: https://www.microcenter.com/product/612970/gskill-ripjaws-v-16gb-(2-x-8gb)-ddr4-3600-pc4-28800-cl16-dual-channel-desktop-memory-kit-f4-3600c16d-16gvkc---black  3600 which shouldn't be a problem with your setup and you save a few dollars. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook rmm ✭ February 4 Thanks! @TSMikeW .. i see the GPU I wanted is sold out already. Would any GTX 1660 S be a good match? This one is available now..ASUS - GeForce GTX 1660 Super Dual Overclocked Dual-Fan 6GB GDDR6 PCIe 3.0 Graphics Card. Does the brand matter too much? 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Ian admin February 4 rmm said: Thanks! @TSMikeW .. i see the GPU I wanted is sold out already. Would any GTX 1660 S be a good match? This one is available now..ASUS - GeForce GTX 1660 Super Dual Overclocked Dual-Fan 6GB GDDR6 PCIe 3.0 Graphics Card. Does the brand matter too much? Not really, the only real differences between brands of the same model of video card would mainly be ports available, overclocking and amount of fans. 1 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Categories 7K All Categories 1.1K The Blog 38 What's Trending 167 How to & Technical Guides 11 Computer Hardware 119 Software 3 Home Office 6 Networking Audio/Visual 2 Home Automation 16 3D Printers 10 Maker 16 PC Build Guides 96 Reviews & Buying Guides 34 Build Showcase 17 Contests 39 Past Contests 1K The Community 1.8K General Discussion 84 New Members 127 Consumer Tech 42 Prebuilt PCs and Laptops 78 Software 4 Audio/Visual 13 Networking & Security 1 Home Automation 2 Digital Photography 3 Content Creators 22 Hobby Boards & Projects 26 3D Printing 53 Retro Arcade/Gaming 86 All Other Tech 1.4K Store Information and Policy 52 Off Topic 6 Community Ideas & Feedback 114 Your Completed Builds 2.7K Build-Your-Own PC 1.7K Help Choosing Parts 227 Graphics Cards 175 CPUs, Memory, and Motherboards 63 Cases and Power Supplies 19 Air and Liquid Cooling 17 Monitors and Displays 30 Peripherals 10 All Other Parts 23 Featured Categories We love seeing what our customers build Submit photos and a description of your PC to our build showcase Submit Now Looking for a little inspiration? See other custom PC builds and get some ideas for what can be done View Build Showcase View builds by: AMD Processors Intel Processors RTX 3090 RTX 3080 RTX 2080 Ti RTX 2080 Super RTX 2070 Super RTX 2070 RTX 2060 Super Radeon RX 5700XT Radeon RX 5700 Air Cooled Liquid Cooled SAME DAY CUSTOM BUILD SERVICE If You Can Dream it, We Can Build it. Services starting at $149.99 More Details Micro Center Homepage Desktops Laptops Computer Parts Computer Accessories Custom PC Builder Build Showcase Networking Electronics 3D Printing Service, Upgrades & Repairs Laptop Battery Replacement Laptop Screen Repair Virus and Malware Removal Hard Drive Recovery and Backup Apple MacBook Repair Custom Built PCs Schedule an Appointment © Vanilla Foundation Theme 2021 Powered By Vanilla Community Article 2060 KO PPD? update: seeing ~1.1MilPPD — Micro Center Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker {$smarty.capture.menu} Activity Categories Discussions Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker Home › Graphics Cards 2060 KO PPD? update: seeing ~1.1MilPPD cine_chris Powder Springs, GA ✭✭✭ May 2020 edited May 2020 in Graphics Cards Hoping to find someone that has run FAHbench &/or has actual data on the EVGA 2060 KO GPUs.  They look to be interesting based on $/PPD basis.  0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Comments TSTonyV admin May 2020 edited May 2020 Hello @cine_chris! Welcome to the Community.  Gamers Nexus is my go-to when it comes to benchmarking data and technical overview of components. They have a review on the EVGA 2060 KO specifically here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mUFRBnJdx3Y It's a pretty thorough breakdown and highlights how the 2060 KO is different from other 2060 cards. In terms of gaming, the 2060 KO is the same as normal RTX 2060 cards but the 2060 KO is different in that it has advantages in workstation applications. This is their original review of the 2060 and covers more benchmarks in games: https://www.gamersnexus.net/hwreviews/3427-nvidia-rtx-2060-founders-edition-review-benchmark-vs-vega-56. They also have a video you can watch covering that information, it's embedded on that page. For gaming performance I'd refer to this guide.  I didn't see FAHbench listed in either guide, but the 2060 KO is a strong option at its price point. It's definitely a much stronger value than the other 2060 models since it undercuts their prices by a decent margin.  1 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook cine_chris Powder Springs, GA ✭✭✭ May 2020 edited May 2020 Thx @TSTonyV, yes, that was an informative video.  I'm not a gamer, but cine-editing, vfx work & [email protected] have shoved me into the GPU universe.  I'm a retired engineer so it's fun for me to look at repurposing old gear for folding platforms and looking at optimizing gear combos for folding.  Part of my repurpose strategy is to use 'open-box' MC gear, I'll be picking up the KO Ultra tomorrow  0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook TSMichaelB admin May 2020 edited May 2020 cine_chris said: Thx @TSTonyV, yes, that was an informative video.  I'm not a gamer, but cine-editing, vfx work & [email protected] have shoved me into the GPU universe.  I'm a retired engineer so it's fun for me to look at repurposing old gear for folding platforms and looking at optimizing gear combos for folding.  Part of my repurpose strategy is to us 'open-box' MC gear, I'll be picking up the KO Ultra tomorrow  Based on some of the results I found online, it appears that the RTX 2060 KO is beating 1080 Ti's when it comes to PPD. Since it technically uses the same TU104 die as the RTX 2080's, it's folding performance is extremely solid for the price, however there is a caveat you must be really aware of. While the die itself is a cutdown RTX 2080, the PCB and cooler is the same used for the GTX 1650 Super GTX 1660 Super. For typical gaming loads, this is fine, but sustained folding might not end well in the long run. If you do go this route, make sure that you have active cooling on the card with an additional fan of some kind, cooling both the PCB on the back and perhaps provide additional intake airflow for the two fans on the side. Edited to correct GPU PCB mistake. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook cine_chris Powder Springs, GA ✭✭✭ May 2020 @TSMichaelB I'm a retired engineer &Ace'd thermo, so I have a keen sensitivity to op-temps & thermo-cycling (an arcane fatigue concept).  I'm using Afterburner w/ a custom fan profile to minimize temp-cycles and op-temps.  Mounting exo-120mm fans to feed in room air.  Yes, the KO is running consistently in the 1.1MilPPD range when I've checked it.  More importantly, it handles the WUs that the 1660s have been choking on.  For me, the MSI 2060 Super has been the best performer.  You can see I'm very utilitarian by the Z87 mobo in the image  1 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook cine_chris Powder Springs, GA ✭✭✭ May 2020 TSMichaelB said: cine_chris said: . While the die itself is a cutdown RTX 2080, the PCB and cooler is the same used for the GTX 1650 Super GTX 1660 Super. For typical gaming loads, this is fine, but sustained folding might not end well in the long run. If you do go this route, make sure that you have active cooling on the card with an additional fan of some kind, cooling both the PCB on the back and perhaps provide additional intake airflow for the two fans on the side. @TSMichaelB I found your comments about the KO card to be useful.  Combining my impressions with power consumption data from Tom's Hdwr, it's clear to me that the KO isn't an optimal choice for folding.  It is the most consistently good GPU that I've tried for folding as it always seems to be hovering around 1.1 milPPD and likely an ideal choice for a mixed gamer/creative user that wants to leverage it's render features.   0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook TSMichaelB admin May 2020 cine_chris said: TSMichaelB said: cine_chris said: . While the die itself is a cutdown RTX 2080, the PCB and cooler is the same used for the GTX 1650 Super GTX 1660 Super. For typical gaming loads, this is fine, but sustained folding might not end well in the long run. If you do go this route, make sure that you have active cooling on the card with an additional fan of some kind, cooling both the PCB on the back and perhaps provide additional intake airflow for the two fans on the side. @TSMichaelB I found your comments about the KO card to be useful.  Combining my impressions with power consumption data from Tom's Hdwr, it's clear to me that the KO isn't an optimal choice for folding.  It is the most consistently good GPU that I've tried for folding as it always seems to be hovering around 1.1 milPPD and likely an ideal choice for a mixed gamer/creative user that wants to leverage it's render features.   Glad it was helpful. My biggest concerns was with the cooling and PCB design being different than that of standards RTX 2060's. For burst gaming loads I imagine it's a non-issue, but under the constant load of folding, I worry for the longevity of the card.  0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Categories 7K All Categories 1.1K The Blog 37 What's Trending 167 How to & Technical Guides 11 Computer Hardware 119 Software 3 Home Office 6 Networking Audio/Visual 2 Home Automation 16 3D Printers 10 Maker 16 PC Build Guides 96 Reviews & Buying Guides 34 Build Showcase 17 Contests 39 Past Contests 1K The Community 1.8K General Discussion 84 New Members 127 Consumer Tech 42 Prebuilt PCs and Laptops 78 Software 4 Audio/Visual 13 Networking & Security 1 Home Automation 2 Digital Photography 3 Content Creators 22 Hobby Boards & Projects 26 3D Printing 53 Retro Arcade/Gaming 86 All Other Tech 1.4K Store Information and Policy 52 Off Topic 6 Community Ideas & Feedback 114 Your Completed Builds 2.7K Build-Your-Own PC 1.7K Help Choosing Parts 227 Graphics Cards 175 CPUs, Memory, and Motherboards 63 Cases and Power Supplies 19 Air and Liquid Cooling 17 Monitors and Displays 30 Peripherals 10 All Other Parts 23 Featured Categories We love seeing what our customers build Submit photos and a description of your PC to our build showcase Submit Now Looking for a little inspiration? See other custom PC builds and get some ideas for what can be done View Build Showcase View builds by: AMD Processors Intel Processors RTX 3090 RTX 3080 RTX 2080 Ti RTX 2080 Super RTX 2070 Super RTX 2070 RTX 2060 Super Radeon RX 5700XT Radeon RX 5700 Air Cooled Liquid Cooled SAME DAY CUSTOM BUILD SERVICE If You Can Dream it, We Can Build it. Services starting at $149.99 More Details Micro Center Homepage Desktops Laptops Computer Parts Computer Accessories Custom PC Builder Build Showcase Networking Electronics 3D Printing Service, Upgrades & Repairs Laptop Battery Replacement Laptop Screen Repair Virus and Malware Removal Hard Drive Recovery and Backup Apple MacBook Repair Custom Built PCs Schedule an Appointment © Vanilla Foundation Theme 2021 Powered By Vanilla Community Article Need Help Choosing Parts — Micro Center Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker {$smarty.capture.menu} Activity Categories Discussions Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker Home › Help Choosing Parts Need Help Choosing Parts krugger39 ✭ September 2020 in Help Choosing Parts I put this parts list together and am looking for some advice. I've never built a PC before and am looking for any helpful tips! I'm on a budget of at least under or equal to $1000. It'll be mainly a gaming PC! I usually play Apex Legends and that is what I would primarily play on this PC. Any and all help is greatly appreciated   https://www.microcenter.com/site/content/custom-pc-builder-intel.aspx?load=65e99785-506d-462c-bed2-492c03d9edfa 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Comments TSTonyV admin September 2020 edited September 2020 Right off the bat there's a few things on there that we can get rid of to save money, like that EVGA liquid cooler. A cooler like that is unnecessary for a CPU like the 9100f and you already added in another CPU cooler anyway. The case also doesn't have an optical drive slot, and really an optical drive is mostly unnecessary these days unless there's specific software that you have to load via DVD. The capture card is also a little confusing, did you add that for a specific reason? The one you put in there is really for recording things off older devices like DVD players or VCRs that connect with the composite cables. having two separate SSDs is also unnecessary. Same for that wireless router, it's not necessary and doesn't actually enable your computer to connect wirlessly. You should look for a motherboard with wifi built in (I assume you have internet in your home already).  Taking ALL that into consideration, we've freed up a lot of cost to get some nice upgrades.  https://www.microcenter.com/site/content/custom-pc-builder-intel.aspx?load=7f5310be-8c72-461e-af2f-de489a98048e We instead opt for the Ryzen 3 3300X + a B450 motherboard that includes wifi, and can go with a GTX 1660 Super for the video card, and can throw in a kit of DDR4-3200 memory. Depending on availability you can also look at the Ryzen 3 3100 or Ryzen 5 3600.  If you're concerned about running up against your budget or the extra cost of Windows, you can always go with a GTX 1650 Super instead to free up a little more cost.  1 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook krugger39 ✭ September 2020 TSTonyV said: Right off the bat there's a few things on there that we can get rid of to save money, like that EVGA liquid cooler. A cooler like that is unnecessary for a CPU like the 9100f and you already added in another CPU cooler anyway. The case also doesn't have an optical drive slot, and really an optical drive is mostly unnecessary these days unless there's specific software that you have to load via DVD. The capture card is also a little confusing, did you add that for a specific reason? The one you put in there is really for recording things off older devices like DVD players or VCRs that connect with the composite cables. having two separate SSDs is also unnecessary. Same for that wireless router, it's not necessary and doesn't actually enable your computer to connect wirlessly. You should look for a motherboard with wifi built in (I assume you have internet in your home already).  Taking ALL that into consideration, we've freed up a lot of cost to get some nice upgrades.  https://www.microcenter.com/site/content/custom-pc-builder-intel.aspx?load=7f5310be-8c72-461e-af2f-de489a98048e We instead opt for the Ryzen 3 3300X + a B450 motherboard that includes wifi, and can go with a GTX 1660 Super for the video card, and can throw in a kit of DDR4-3200 memory. Depending on availability you can also look at the Ryzen 3 3100 or Ryzen 5 3600.  If you're concerned about running up against your budget or the extra cost of Windows, you can always go with a GTX 1650 Super instead to free up a little more cost.  Wow thank you this has helped me so much and I really appreciate it! I'm very new to learning about PC's and how to build them and everything so my research was probably a little rough in choosing the different parts and everything and trying to discern what was necessary and what was not. Your edits to the build make it look a lot better for sure! I'll look into the GTX 1650compared to Windows and try to make a decision there. Again, thank you so much for your suggestions and your help and explaining the different choices and everything! 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook TSTonyV admin September 2020 Of course! Let us know if you have any other questions.  0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Categories 7K All Categories 1.1K The Blog 37 What's Trending 167 How to & Technical Guides 11 Computer Hardware 119 Software 3 Home Office 6 Networking Audio/Visual 2 Home Automation 16 3D Printers 10 Maker 16 PC Build Guides 96 Reviews & Buying Guides 34 Build Showcase 17 Contests 39 Past Contests 1K The Community 1.8K General Discussion 84 New Members 127 Consumer Tech 42 Prebuilt PCs and Laptops 78 Software 4 Audio/Visual 13 Networking & Security 1 Home Automation 2 Digital Photography 3 Content Creators 22 Hobby Boards & Projects 26 3D Printing 53 Retro Arcade/Gaming 86 All Other Tech 1.4K Store Information and Policy 52 Off Topic 6 Community Ideas & Feedback 114 Your Completed Builds 2.7K Build-Your-Own PC 1.7K Help Choosing Parts 227 Graphics Cards 175 CPUs, Memory, and Motherboards 63 Cases and Power Supplies 19 Air and Liquid Cooling 17 Monitors and Displays 30 Peripherals 10 All Other Parts 23 Featured Categories We love seeing what our customers build Submit photos and a description of your PC to our build showcase Submit Now Looking for a little inspiration? See other custom PC builds and get some ideas for what can be done View Build Showcase View builds by: AMD Processors Intel Processors RTX 3090 RTX 3080 RTX 2080 Ti RTX 2080 Super RTX 2070 Super RTX 2070 RTX 2060 Super Radeon RX 5700XT Radeon RX 5700 Air Cooled Liquid Cooled SAME DAY CUSTOM BUILD SERVICE If You Can Dream it, We Can Build it. Services starting at $149.99 More Details Micro Center Homepage Desktops Laptops Computer Parts Computer Accessories Custom PC Builder Build Showcase Networking Electronics 3D Printing Service, Upgrades & Repairs Laptop Battery Replacement Laptop Screen Repair Virus and Malware Removal Hard Drive Recovery and Backup Apple MacBook Repair Custom Built PCs Schedule an Appointment © Vanilla Foundation Theme 2021 Powered By Vanilla Community Article Parts? What To Choose Tip Guide (General Planning Steps Where To Start) — Micro Center Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker {$smarty.capture.menu} Activity Categories Discussions Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker Home › Help Choosing Parts Parts? What To Choose Tip Guide (General Planning Steps Where To Start) BubbleMax MN ✭ July 2020 in Help Choosing Parts Disclaimer this will apply to anyone making or choosing parts this is not going to be super part specific but a generalized part guide as a whole. The number with a letter are finer details.  1st: WHATS the budget. This is going to MASSIVELY either expand or hinder the options         1A: This will decide if you should be buying a PC or maybe its best to save up to get what you intend to get or play on.  2nd: What graphic quality FITS in your budget.        2A: Also what is the purpose of the build (Basic consumer use? Gaming or Content Creation?)              2B: make sure you check for sales sometimes you get lucky. 3rd:If Gaming understand that its the CPU is what tells the GPU what to do and how much power to use to reach the graphical power needed for the graphical setting. So pick a CPU that is powerful enough for the GPU so you don't bottle neck one or both. That means sticking generally if gaming with a i7 or better. This goes with its Ryzen equivalent if you intend to play AAA new games. They NEED the hyperthreading/multithreads.                3A: DON'T buy a over powered GPU and pair it with a under powered CPU.        3B: i3 and i5 and ryzen equivalents are best matched probably with 900 and lower GTX's         3C: i7's and i9's have hyperthreading and their Ryzen equivalents multi-threading a pretty much must for HD AAA graphically intense gaming in general and are easily match with any 1000's  to 2000 GTX series cards and their AMD equivalents 4th: Power supplies, as a general rule safest to first estimate the average power draw for the CPU + GPU. Then as a general rule you want to over shoot that minimum amount of wattage usage by 200. Its better safe than sorry when it comes to powering a PC.        4A: This means for for 900 and lower GPU's and  paired with i5 or i3 and or Ryzen equivalent CPU's probably a in the 500 to 550 Watt PSU's        4B: For 1000  to 2000 series GPU's and their CPU partners on most motherboards will use 650 to a 750 watt PSU       4C:And only in rare cases should anyone consider 850 or 1000 watt PSU's unless your making a 3K to 6K or higher usd build. That is using REALLY premium parts.  5th: What memory should an average HD to 4K gaming rig should use? As of the last 5 to 10 years MHZ in terms of gaming at least frequencies do matter.        5A: General consumers only really need a max for now about 16 GB MAX and probably no higher than 3000Mhz. (I suggest 16GB cause generally Chrome enjoys large amounts of RAM and if you want extra applications you will need the extra ram capacity or run the risk of noticeable lagging.)       5B: Gamers will if they can afford it are probably the main people/consumer who will notice mhz influence what they do in terms of ram. Generally as a gamer you probably will want a min of 16 GB's and a max of 32 GB's. With mhz 3200 to 3600 you can expect for most AAA intense games a 10 to 20 FPS increase from their lower counterparts just cause of frequency. Bewarned any higher and the performance plateau's quite a bit. (Also with gaming more RAM is ALWAYS BETTER THAN LESS its one way to mitigate memory leaks)      5C: Content creators and or video editing and photographers if you are working with 4K or 8K projects 64 GB's Min for still pictures and higher 128GB and maybe even more if you are live image/video work. 6th: Once you know the scope of your build you want. Then compare it to your CURRENT BUDGET. And think can I afford this now or is it best to SAVE buy maybe some parts and then just save up to get a proper build. 7th: And final build tip well side tip if you are building a powerful PC that can handle 2k or 4K display dont bottleneck your PC with a low 1080P display. You are missing out on the value of your PC.  Side tip: For gamers when spec'ing out a PC DON'T use steam's suggested or recommended specs these are OFTEN low balled as being about as budget as you can get. As in what developers "barely managed" to get to be stable. I work as video game QA tester and I've experienced what a recommended spec PC is like and in short its not pleasant. Save up and get a good gaming rig. (Good rigs don't have to cost a ton 1060's to 1660's GTX's are plenty good for solid HD GPU's and i7's and their ryzen equivalents are plenty powerful enough when paired with them.) In short the era of specing and expecting budget PC's to work at the cost of a console are coming to an end. Consoles this coming gen are probably going to catch up and set the new standard for AAA gaming on PC's. Just a warning as to where gaming is going.  0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Comments BubbleMax MN ✭ July 2020 edited July 2020 Some of these tips might cost ya a bit more than you expected but it should set you up to be future proofed for at least one and if you invest a bit higher maybe 2+ generations of PC gaming. Also feel free to check my profile for a build that cost me around 2.3k runs 2k pretty flawlessly and generally has no problems what so ever with just about every game cool, chill and preped to run at high or Ultra.  0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Ichthus ✭ July 2020 edited July 2020 So I have to say, I'm pretty confused by your PSU and CPU recommendations.  I dislike making sweeping recommendations for an entire series of video cards. Within each series of video card there's a wide range of performance tiers and different power requirements. A GTX 980ti is going to have higher power draw than an RTX 2060 even though they're part of a different series. You can run a GTX 1650 Super with a 400W PSU without any problems. While I do think it's a good rule of thumb to recommend a 650W PSU, that's because 650W is enough to run basically anything except a dual GPU system or a system with an extremely high power draw CPU (Intel xtreme series, threadrippers, possibly heavily overclocked i7/i9 CPUs), NOT because of when your video card was made. 850W is overkill in any system that isn't using multiple GPUs.  I also have to question your recommendation specifically for an i7 for gaming. If you're just gaming you don't need more than a Ryzen 5 or Intel i5. The i5-10600k is nearly identical in performance to i7 and i9 parts in gaming despite it's core disadvantage. Even modern AAA titles still aren't good at utilizing all those extra cores and threads yet. Even on a budget modern CPUs are so capable that they won't be bottlenecked by anything except the 2080 Supers/2080 Ti type cards, even in AAA titles. You can pair a 3300X with something like an RTX 2060 Super or 2070 Super and it will be just fine. I feel like this also ignores how important your GPU is for your FPS. A Ryzen 3 3300X +2070 Super will outperform an i7-10700k + 2060 because of the GPU difference. If you overspend on your CPU, you're still going to have a bottleneck.  0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook TSMichaelB admin July 2020 @BubbleMax, I genuinely appreciate your desire to help others with their system builds and decision making process, however it's important that we make sure the information provided is accurate. Please see my comments below on various pieces of your post. For added clarification, I've provided sources to help better understand my points. BubbleMax said: 3rd:If Gaming understand that its the CPU is what tells the GPU what to do and how much power to use to reach the graphical power needed for the graphical setting. So pick a CPU that is powerful enough for the GPU so you don't bottle neck one or both. That means sticking generally if gaming with a i7 or better. This goes with its Ryzen equivalent if you intend to play AAA new games. They NEED the hyperthreading/multithreads.                3A: DON'T buy a over powered GPU and pair it with a under powered CPU.        3B: i3 and i5 and ryzen equivalents are best matched probably with 900 and lower GTX's         3C: i7's and i9's have hyperthreading and their Ryzen equivalents multi-threading a pretty much must for HD AAA graphically intense gaming in general and are easily match with any 1000's  to 2000 GTX series cards and their AMD equivalents The information bolded above is an example of inaccurate information. In response to point 3: First and foremost, the CPU does not tell the graphics card how much power it should be using for any given setting. The CPU handles various tasks such as AI processing/calculation (most notably in RTS games or titles with NPC characters), netcode for online games (where your position is relative to your fellow players on the client side of things), some physics elements, audio processing, and most importantly; draw calls. Draw calls are responsible for telling the graphics card about everything that is to be rendered on-screen. This can range from various textures to specific objects and their locations. To fully understand the significance of Draw Calls, let's use Skyrim as an example. You walk into a building, ready to throw a bucket atop the head of some poor NPC in an attempt to loot them unnoticed. Sadly, your inventory is full, so you drop the 400 sweet rolls you were hoarding in your inventory like a lunatic, only for all of them to fall to the ground at once the moment you exit the paused inventory menu. This initial lag spike, one often blames on the GPU, but would likely end up being your CPU. You see, your CPU must now account for the object location and textures of all of these sweet rolls, and tell your GPU where they are located, so that it has the data to know what to draw. The more draw calls in a scene, the more stress on your CPU. For more information on how draw calls work (and the different methods to handle draw calls from an engine level), I recommend taking a look at Unity's page on the subject: https://docs.unity3d.com/Manual/DrawCallBatching.html. Some of the different CPU tasks listed above can be parallelized to be processed more efficiently with more CPU cores which is why you notice an improvement with higher core processors or processors with Hyperthreading/Simultaneous Multi-Threading. Some however, can't be parallelized, or only parallelized to a certain extent, leaving you bound by the speed of your individual cores. This is known as Amdahl's law. More information on this subject can be found here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amdahl%27s_law This is also why your mention of gaming needing an i7 or better, or that they "need" Hypertreading/SMT is simply not true. The number of cores/threads one needs depends entirely on the game they are playing/the engine it uses. For a better understanding of performance scaling across processors, I strongly advise taking a look at GamersNexus CPU testing methdology: https://www.gamersnexus.net/guides/3577-cpu-test-methodology-unveil-for-2020-compile-gaming-more#!/ccomment-comment=10013212. They include a fantastic suite of benchmarks, ranging from compiling to gaming and shows performance scaling through a wide range of processors.  BubbleMax said: 4th: Power supplies, as a general rule safest to first estimate the average power draw for the CPU + GPU. Then as a general rule you want to over shoot that minimum amount of wattage usage by 200. Its better safe than sorry when it comes to powering a PC.        4A: This means for for 900 and lower GPU's and  paired with i5 or i3 and or Ryzen equivalent CPU's probably a in the 500 to 550 Watt PSU's        4B: For 1000  to 2000 series GPU's and their CPU partners on most motherboards will use 650 to a 750 watt PSU       4C:And only in rare cases should anyone consider 850 or 1000 watt PSU's unless your making a 3K to 6K or higher usd build. That is using REALLY premium parts.  These PSU recommendations are worrisome as they are far too broad, and can be potentially harmful to the components of others that follow this advice as a general rule of thumb. There is only one way to correctly determine the amount of power you need. This requires researching the power consumption of the components you intend to purchase such as CPU, GPU, platform (motherboard/memory), fans & various add-in devices, then buy a PSU with large enough power rails to provide that power. Simply combining the average power draw for a CPU and GPU is not enough, as a CPU may pull far less power on average when gaming, but the amount of power pulled when an intense instruction set such as AVX is used may far exceed that value. Simply adding a 200W buffer will not suffice, and this does not factor capacitor aging or peak spikes in power consumption, depending on the specific components used. My recommendation is to determine the total amount of power you are going to consume (on average), then factor in PSU efficiency levels and buy a PSU that lets you achieve those levels under load. Understand that PSU's operate at different levels of efficiency depending on what percentage of their capacitance is being used. Let's use the EVGA SuperNOVA 1000W G3 as an example. Here, you can see the efficiency level of the SuperNOVA 1000 G3 at various load levels. At 10% load, the PSU is 86% efficient. This means if your system is only using 10% of the 1000w PSU (100W), you'll only achieve 86.39% efficiency. At 20% load, this efficiency changes to 90.04%. This means if your system is using a 200W load, you'll be 4% more efficient than what you were at a 100W load. At 50% load, you can see efficiency improve to 91.43%, and starts to trail off again from there. I personally recommend taking your average power consumption and doubling it, just to maintain this peak 50% load efficiency, as it's often the most efficient load level for modern PSU's. For example: If your average power is 300W, a 600W PSU will let you run at 50% load, giving you the most efficiency. This also gives you a large enough buffer to factor in capacitor aging over time, and gives you the added benefit of quieter operation as most PSU's are designed to operate their fan based on internal temperature, and the less power used = less heat generated. For more information on your specific PSU efficiency, please visit https://www.plugloadsolutions.com/80PlusPowerSupplies.aspx and look for your power supply. Does this mean you NEED a 600W PSU for a system pulling 300W of power? Absolutely not. You can use various tips & tricks from the ATX/PCI-SIG specs to help determine "worst case" power consumption, and buy a PSU to be within that power envelope. For example: A 6 pin connector on a graphics card is designed to safely handle 75W of power. An 8 pin connector on a graphics card is designed to handle 150W of power. The PCIe slot itself is designed to provide up to 75% of power. This information helps us understand the potential peak power consumption of a card if it adheres to ATX/PCI-SIG specifications. The examples below assume that the cards have not been shunt modded, or have not had their VBIOS power limits modified. Example 1: You have a PCIe graphics card with a 6 pin connector. You are uncertain of it's real power consumption, but you know the 6 pin connector can safely handle 75W of power and the PCIe slot itself can do another 75W. This means that the card will not consume more than 150W of power as long as it adheres to the aforementioned specifications.  Example 2: You have a PCIe graphics card with a 6 pin connector and 8 pin connector. You know the slot will provide up to 75W of power, the 6 pin connector will provide another 75W and the 8 pin another 150W. You can safely determine that the card will not exceed 300W of power, and can plan your PSU decisions around such information. The information listed above is why I consider your PSU wattage recommendations inaccurate, as it has nothing to do with graphics generations, and everything to do with the power consumption of your components as a whole. Understand that power efficiency typically improves throughout each generation. A graphics card being a GTX 900 series doesn't automatically mean it consumes less power. A 980 Ti will consume just as much power as a 1080 Ti/2080 Ti, despite offering significantly less performance. We can never make broad recommendations of product generations alone, we must always factor in the power consumption of each component when making PSU recommendations. Luckily, we have third party review outlets to rely on for this information. It's always a good idea to check multiple sources for reviews on power consumption for the components you are interested in. Once you have a general understanding for the power they consume, pick the best PSU you can afford that meets those requirements and you'll be fine. BubbleMax said: 5th: What memory should an average HD to 4K gaming rig should use? As of the last 5 to 10 years MHZ in terms of gaming at least frequencies do matter.        5A: General consumers only really need a max for now about 16 GB MAX and probably no higher than 3000Mhz. (I suggest 16GB cause generally Chrome enjoys large amounts of RAM and if you want extra applications you will need the extra ram capacity or run the risk of noticeable lagging.)       5B: Gamers will if they can afford it are probably the main people/consumer who will notice mhz influence what they do in terms of ram. Generally as a gamer you probably will want a min of 16 GB's and a max of 32 GB's. With mhz 3200 to 3600 you can expect for most AAA intense games a 10 to 20 FPS increase from their lower counterparts just cause of frequency. Bewarned any higher and the performance plateau's quite a bit. (Also with gaming more RAM is ALWAYS BETTER THAN LESS its one way to mitigate memory leaks) In response to 5A: This is once again a broad generalization that can be worrisome without defining what a "general consumer" is. I am also worried about the "no higher than 3000Mhz" recommendation as there is no explanation provided as to why this would be less beneficial or potentially detrimental to their system. In response to 5B: I do not understand the recommendations here. The minimum amount of RAM depends entirely on the games/applications the individual gamer is planning to use. To say they NEED at least 16GB of RAM is not accurate. Having more would definitely be beneficial in the long run, but it's by no means a requirement. Understand there are many different types of games and types of gamers out there, not all of them have the same system requirements to engage in the content they enjoy. We cannot treat all gamers with a blanket generalization, we need to make sure we clarify the scenarios in which they'll need more memory and why it's beneficial for them to make that investment. I am also concerned with the performance claims made. There exists no specific number that one can attach to the performance benefits of faster memory because it changes depending on the situation. The performance benefit of faster memory will depend entirely on how much CPU overhead exists in a given situation, and whether it's I/O based. As the bottleneck shifts from the CPU to the GPU (4K gaming being an easy example), you'll see far less of a performance benefit, if any. It's also not just memory frequency at play. Understand that memory frequency is only a piece of the equation. True memory performance is dictated by a combination of your processors memory controller, the trace topology of your motherboard, the specific RAM integrated circuits (IC's) in your DIMM's and a combination of the aforementioned frequency of your ram alongside your primary, secondary and tertiary timings. All of this factors in to the potential performance of your memory, and as a result, the potential performance of your applications when used in conjunction with said memory.  The final claim in this section that states "gaming with more RAM is ALWAYS BETTER THAN LESS" is also inaccurate. Having more RAM isn't a solution to applications suffering from a memory leak, it's more of a band-aid. It also has the negative side effect of putting added stress on your processors memory controller, reducing the max memory frequency you'll be able to achieve while maintaining stability.  I hope that some of the information I've provided helps clarify things. Understand that I have great respect for your desire to help others, and I want to assist in that endeavor to make sure the information provided is as accurate and as complete as possible. I firmly believe that the information we provide is at its best when we fully understand the subject matter, and I hope you share my same desire to improve our understanding of this hobby we enjoy. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook BubbleMax MN ✭ July 2020 Ichthus said: So I have to say, I'm pretty confused by your PSU and CPU recommendations.  I dislike making sweeping recommendations for an entire series of video cards. Within each series of video card there's a wide range of performance tiers and different power requirements. A GTX 980ti is going to have higher power draw than an RTX 2060 even though they're part of a different series. You can run a GTX 1650 Super with a 400W PSU without any problems. While I do think it's a good rule of thumb to recommend a 650W PSU, that's because 650W is enough to run basically anything except a dual GPU system or a system with an extremely high power draw CPU (Intel xtreme series, threadrippers, possibly heavily overclocked i7/i9 CPUs), NOT because of when your video card was made. 850W is overkill in any system that isn't using multiple GPUs.  I also have to question your recommendation specifically for an i7 for gaming. If you're just gaming you don't need more than a Ryzen 5 or Intel i5. The i5-10600k is nearly identical in performance to i7 and i9 parts in gaming despite it's core disadvantage. Even modern AAA titles still aren't good at utilizing all those extra cores and threads yet. Even on a budget modern CPUs are so capable that they won't be bottlenecked by anything except the 2080 Supers/2080 Ti type cards, even in AAA titles. You can pair a 3300X with something like an RTX 2060 Super or 2070 Super and it will be just fine. I feel like this also ignores how important your GPU is for your FPS. A Ryzen 3 3300X +2070 Super will outperform an i7-10700k + 2060 because of the GPU difference. If you overspend on your CPU, you're still going to have a bottleneck.  The point is were aging out of a entire era of cpu's and gpu's people who base of the bare minimum run the risk of buying a obsolete build.  0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook BubbleMax MN ✭ July 2020 TSMichaelB said: @BubbleMax, I genuinely appreciate your desire to help others with their system builds and decision making process, however it's important that we make sure the information provided is accurate. Please see my comments below on various pieces of your post. For added clarification, I've provided sources to help better understand my points. BubbleMax said: 3rd:If Gaming understand that its the CPU is what tells the GPU what to do and how much power to use to reach the graphical power needed for the graphical setting. So pick a CPU that is powerful enough for the GPU so you don't bottle neck one or both. That means sticking generally if gaming with a i7 or better. This goes with its Ryzen equivalent if you intend to play AAA new games. They NEED the hyperthreading/multithreads.                3A: DON'T buy a over powered GPU and pair it with a under powered CPU.        3B: i3 and i5 and ryzen equivalents are best matched probably with 900 and lower GTX's         3C: i7's and i9's have hyperthreading and their Ryzen equivalents multi-threading a pretty much must for HD AAA graphically intense gaming in general and are easily match with any 1000's  to 2000 GTX series cards and their AMD equivalents The information bolded above is an example of inaccurate information. In response to point 3: First and foremost, the CPU does not tell the graphics card how much power it should be using for any given setting. The CPU handles various tasks such as AI processing/calculation (most notably in RTS games or titles with NPC characters), netcode for online games (where your position is relative to your fellow players on the client side of things), some physics elements, audio processing, and most importantly; draw calls. Draw calls are responsible for telling the graphics card about everything that is to be rendered on-screen. This can range from various textures to specific objects and their locations. To fully understand the significance of Draw Calls, let's use Skyrim as an example. You walk into a building, ready to throw a bucket atop the head of some poor NPC in an attempt to loot them unnoticed. Sadly, your inventory is full, so you drop the 400 sweet rolls you were hoarding in your inventory like a lunatic, only for all of them to fall to the ground at once the moment you exit the paused inventory menu. This initial lag spike, one often blames on the GPU, but would likely end up being your CPU. You see, your CPU must now account for the object location and textures of all of these sweet rolls, and tell your GPU where they are located, so that it has the data to know what to draw. The more draw calls in a scene, the more stress on your CPU. For more information on how draw calls work (and the different methods to handle draw calls from an engine level), I recommend taking a look at Unity's page on the subject: https://docs.unity3d.com/Manual/DrawCallBatching.html. Some of the different CPU tasks listed above can be parallelized to be processed more efficiently with more CPU cores which is why you notice an improvement with higher core processors or processors with Hyperthreading/Simultaneous Multi-Threading. Some however, can't be parallelized, or only parallelized to a certain extent, leaving you bound by the speed of your individual cores. This is known as Amdahl's law. More information on this subject can be found here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amdahl%27s_law This is also why your mention of gaming needing an i7 or better, or that they "need" Hypertreading/SMT is simply not true. The number of cores/threads one needs depends entirely on the game they are playing/the engine it uses. For a better understanding of performance scaling across processors, I strongly advise taking a look at GamersNexus CPU testing methdology: https://www.gamersnexus.net/guides/3577-cpu-test-methodology-unveil-for-2020-compile-gaming-more#!/ccomment-comment=10013212. They include a fantastic suite of benchmarks, ranging from compiling to gaming and shows performance scaling through a wide range of processors.  BubbleMax said: 4th: Power supplies, as a general rule safest to first estimate the average power draw for the CPU + GPU. Then as a general rule you want to over shoot that minimum amount of wattage usage by 200. Its better safe than sorry when it comes to powering a PC.        4A: This means for for 900 and lower GPU's and  paired with i5 or i3 and or Ryzen equivalent CPU's probably a in the 500 to 550 Watt PSU's        4B: For 1000  to 2000 series GPU's and their CPU partners on most motherboards will use 650 to a 750 watt PSU       4C:And only in rare cases should anyone consider 850 or 1000 watt PSU's unless your making a 3K to 6K or higher usd build. That is using REALLY premium parts.  These PSU recommendations are worrisome as they are far too broad, and can be potentially harmful to the components of others that follow this advice as a general rule of thumb. There is only one way to correctly determine the amount of power you need. This requires researching the power consumption of the components you intend to purchase such as CPU, GPU, platform (motherboard/memory), fans & various add-in devices, then buy a PSU with large enough power rails to provide that power. Simply combining the average power draw for a CPU and GPU is not enough, as a CPU may pull far less power on average when gaming, but the amount of power pulled when an intense instruction set such as AVX is used may far exceed that value. Simply adding a 200W buffer will not suffice, and this does not factor capacitor aging or peak spikes in power consumption, depending on the specific components used. My recommendation is to determine the total amount of power you are going to consume (on average), then factor in PSU efficiency levels and buy a PSU that lets you achieve those levels under load. Understand that PSU's operate at different levels of efficiency depending on what percentage of their capacitance is being used. Let's use the EVGA SuperNOVA 1000W G3 as an example. Here, you can see the efficiency level of the SuperNOVA 1000 G3 at various load levels. At 10% load, the PSU is 86% efficient. This means if your system is only using 10% of the 1000w PSU (100W), you'll only achieve 86.39% efficiency. At 20% load, this efficiency changes to 90.04%. This means if your system is using a 200W load, you'll be 4% more efficient than what you were at a 100W load. At 50% load, you can see efficiency improve to 91.43%, and starts to trail off again from there. I personally recommend taking your average power consumption and doubling it, just to maintain this peak 50% load efficiency, as it's often the most efficient load level for modern PSU's. For example: If your average power is 300W, a 600W PSU will let you run at 50% load, giving you the most efficiency. This also gives you a large enough buffer to factor in capacitor aging over time, and gives you the added benefit of quieter operation as most PSU's are designed to operate their fan based on internal temperature, and the less power used = less heat generated. For more information on your specific PSU efficiency, please visit https://www.plugloadsolutions.com/80PlusPowerSupplies.aspx and look for your power supply. Does this mean you NEED a 600W PSU for a system pulling 300W of power? Absolutely not. You can use various tips & tricks from the ATX/PCI-SIG specs to help determine "worst case" power consumption, and buy a PSU to be within that power envelope. For example: A 6 pin connector on a graphics card is designed to safely handle 75W of power. An 8 pin connector on a graphics card is designed to handle 150W of power. The PCIe slot itself is designed to provide up to 75% of power. This information helps us understand the potential peak power consumption of a card if it adheres to ATX/PCI-SIG specifications. The examples below assume that the cards have not been shunt modded, or have not had their VBIOS power limits modified. Example 1: You have a PCIe graphics card with a 6 pin connector. You are uncertain of it's real power consumption, but you know the 6 pin connector can safely handle 75W of power and the PCIe slot itself can do another 75W. This means that the card will not consume more than 150W of power as long as it adheres to the aforementioned specifications.  Example 2: You have a PCIe graphics card with a 6 pin connector and 8 pin connector. You know the slot will provide up to 75W of power, the 6 pin connector will provide another 75W and the 8 pin another 150W. You can safely determine that the card will not exceed 300W of power, and can plan your PSU decisions around such information. The information listed above is why I consider your PSU wattage recommendations inaccurate, as it has nothing to do with graphics generations, and everything to do with the power consumption of your components as a whole. Understand that power efficiency typically improves throughout each generation. A graphics card being a GTX 900 series doesn't automatically mean it consumes less power. A 980 Ti will consume just as much power as a 1080 Ti/2080 Ti, despite offering significantly less performance. We can never make broad recommendations of product generations alone, we must always factor in the power consumption of each component when making PSU recommendations. Luckily, we have third party review outlets to rely on for this information. It's always a good idea to check multiple sources for reviews on power consumption for the components you are interested in. Once you have a general understanding for the power they consume, pick the best PSU you can afford that meets those requirements and you'll be fine. BubbleMax said: 5th: What memory should an average HD to 4K gaming rig should use? As of the last 5 to 10 years MHZ in terms of gaming at least frequencies do matter.        5A: General consumers only really need a max for now about 16 GB MAX and probably no higher than 3000Mhz. (I suggest 16GB cause generally Chrome enjoys large amounts of RAM and if you want extra applications you will need the extra ram capacity or run the risk of noticeable lagging.)       5B: Gamers will if they can afford it are probably the main people/consumer who will notice mhz influence what they do in terms of ram. Generally as a gamer you probably will want a min of 16 GB's and a max of 32 GB's. With mhz 3200 to 3600 you can expect for most AAA intense games a 10 to 20 FPS increase from their lower counterparts just cause of frequency. Bewarned any higher and the performance plateau's quite a bit. (Also with gaming more RAM is ALWAYS BETTER THAN LESS its one way to mitigate memory leaks) In response to 5A: This is once again a broad generalization that can be worrisome without defining what a "general consumer" is. I am also worried about the "no higher than 3000Mhz" recommendation as there is no explanation provided as to why this would be less beneficial or potentially detrimental to their system. In response to 5B: I do not understand the recommendations here. The minimum amount of RAM depends entirely on the games/applications the individual gamer is planning to use. To say they NEED at least 16GB of RAM is not accurate. Having more would definitely be beneficial in the long run, but it's by no means a requirement. Understand there are many different types of games and types of gamers out there, not all of them have the same system requirements to engage in the content they enjoy. We cannot treat all gamers with a blanket generalization, we need to make sure we clarify the scenarios in which they'll need more memory and why it's beneficial for them to make that investment. I am also concerned with the performance claims made. There exists no specific number that one can attach to the performance benefits of faster memory because it changes depending on the situation. The performance benefit of faster memory will depend entirely on how much CPU overhead exists in a given situation, and whether it's I/O based. As the bottleneck shifts from the CPU to the GPU (4K gaming being an easy example), you'll see far less of a performance benefit, if any. It's also not just memory frequency at play. Understand that memory frequency is only a piece of the equation. True memory performance is dictated by a combination of your processors memory controller, the trace topology of your motherboard, the specific RAM integrated circuits (IC's) in your DIMM's and a combination of the aforementioned frequency of your ram alongside your primary, secondary and tertiary timings. All of this factors in to the potential performance of your memory, and as a result, the potential performance of your applications when used in conjunction with said memory.  The final claim in this section that states "gaming with more RAM is ALWAYS BETTER THAN LESS" is also inaccurate. Having more RAM isn't a solution to applications suffering from a memory leak, it's more of a band-aid. It also has the negative side effect of putting added stress on your processors memory controller, reducing the max memory frequency you'll be able to achieve while maintaining stability.  I hope that some of the information I've provided helps clarify things. Understand that I have great respect for your desire to help others, and I want to assist in that endeavor to make sure the information provided is as accurate and as complete as possible. I firmly believe that the information we provide is at its best when we fully understand the subject matter, and I hope you share my same desire to improve our understanding of this hobby we enjoy. The main point was just to get people not to think about getting higher than what a min spec build for gaming and to go for more not less when it comes to thinking a PC build in general. If you want to make or chose parts for a build shoot a tier higher than you might think is a bare min budget cause then you can kill two birds with one PC. Kind of idea. Cause it would stink as a consumer and as a gamer to buy a PC that is under powered for a game app and then have to go back and spend even more money for what you could have spent from the start. Essentially a 300 gaming PC build could end up being a return to the store and having to deal with the hassle of rebuilding and or re-selecting parts and then also the hassle of credit card banks possibly thinking the purchase was fraudulent.  As to the memory part about more being better well memory can also wear out over time so having a bit more could allow memory to compensate if bad sectors develop. Giving the users an extra maybe 1 or even 4 months to come up with a replacement. Where as shooting for the bare minimum could mean the whole stick just fails cause there isn't anymore to page. And as to the max speed of ram ideally that idea is to give the CPU the option to run at max speed. If it can and wants to its meant like having a bit more memory to give room to fluctuate if its needed. My tips were made with the intent of a buyer would want to set up their PC build with the intent it might last more than one generation of mid to high level entertainment that could also hybidize into being slightly future proofed as well.  And to clarify what general consumer would mean someone who is looking for a build just to use for normal non gamer or enthusiast usage. But suggest maybe paying the couple extra hundred dollars so the PC will be still good even if the parts start to wear down due to heavy and or long usage. Like surfing the web and having the habit of having too many tabs. In google chrome, if you know you have this habit it would be best to then recognize the habit and then plan in the pc build to compensate. The idea with the general consumer tips is to build a PC that will last, perform well and not have them finding another PC in 1-3 years. Cause buying basic mass produced PC's can end up costing in the long term as much or even in rare cases more if you are buying upwards in terms of new parts every new hardware to price generation. As new more efficient hardware often is more expensive to equal the improved performance.  0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook BubbleMax MN ✭ July 2020 BubbleMax said: TSMichaelB said: @BubbleMax, I genuinely appreciate your desire to help others with their system builds and decision making process, however it's important that we make sure the information provided is accurate. Please see my comments below on various pieces of your post. For added clarification, I've provided sources to help better understand my points. BubbleMax said: 3rd:If Gaming understand that its the CPU is what tells the GPU what to do and how much power to use to reach the graphical power needed for the graphical setting. So pick a CPU that is powerful enough for the GPU so you don't bottle neck one or both. That means sticking generally if gaming with a i7 or better. This goes with its Ryzen equivalent if you intend to play AAA new games. They NEED the hyperthreading/multithreads.                3A: DON'T buy a over powered GPU and pair it with a under powered CPU.        3B: i3 and i5 and ryzen equivalents are best matched probably with 900 and lower GTX's         3C: i7's and i9's have hyperthreading and their Ryzen equivalents multi-threading a pretty much must for HD AAA graphically intense gaming in general and are easily match with any 1000's  to 2000 GTX series cards and their AMD equivalents The information bolded above is an example of inaccurate information. In response to point 3: First and foremost, the CPU does not tell the graphics card how much power it should be using for any given setting. The CPU handles various tasks such as AI processing/calculation (most notably in RTS games or titles with NPC characters), netcode for online games (where your position is relative to your fellow players on the client side of things), some physics elements, audio processing, and most importantly; draw calls. Draw calls are responsible for telling the graphics card about everything that is to be rendered on-screen. This can range from various textures to specific objects and their locations. To fully understand the significance of Draw Calls, let's use Skyrim as an example. You walk into a building, ready to throw a bucket atop the head of some poor NPC in an attempt to loot them unnoticed. Sadly, your inventory is full, so you drop the 400 sweet rolls you were hoarding in your inventory like a lunatic, only for all of them to fall to the ground at once the moment you exit the paused inventory menu. This initial lag spike, one often blames on the GPU, but would likely end up being your CPU. You see, your CPU must now account for the object location and textures of all of these sweet rolls, and tell your GPU where they are located, so that it has the data to know what to draw. The more draw calls in a scene, the more stress on your CPU. For more information on how draw calls work (and the different methods to handle draw calls from an engine level), I recommend taking a look at Unity's page on the subject: https://docs.unity3d.com/Manual/DrawCallBatching.html. Some of the different CPU tasks listed above can be parallelized to be processed more efficiently with more CPU cores which is why you notice an improvement with higher core processors or processors with Hyperthreading/Simultaneous Multi-Threading. Some however, can't be parallelized, or only parallelized to a certain extent, leaving you bound by the speed of your individual cores. This is known as Amdahl's law. More information on this subject can be found here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amdahl%27s_law This is also why your mention of gaming needing an i7 or better, or that they "need" Hypertreading/SMT is simply not true. The number of cores/threads one needs depends entirely on the game they are playing/the engine it uses. For a better understanding of performance scaling across processors, I strongly advise taking a look at GamersNexus CPU testing methdology: https://www.gamersnexus.net/guides/3577-cpu-test-methodology-unveil-for-2020-compile-gaming-more#!/ccomment-comment=10013212. They include a fantastic suite of benchmarks, ranging from compiling to gaming and shows performance scaling through a wide range of processors.  BubbleMax said: 4th: Power supplies, as a general rule safest to first estimate the average power draw for the CPU + GPU. Then as a general rule you want to over shoot that minimum amount of wattage usage by 200. Its better safe than sorry when it comes to powering a PC.        4A: This means for for 900 and lower GPU's and  paired with i5 or i3 and or Ryzen equivalent CPU's probably a in the 500 to 550 Watt PSU's        4B: For 1000  to 2000 series GPU's and their CPU partners on most motherboards will use 650 to a 750 watt PSU       4C:And only in rare cases should anyone consider 850 or 1000 watt PSU's unless your making a 3K to 6K or higher usd build. That is using REALLY premium parts.  These PSU recommendations are worrisome as they are far too broad, and can be potentially harmful to the components of others that follow this advice as a general rule of thumb. There is only one way to correctly determine the amount of power you need. This requires researching the power consumption of the components you intend to purchase such as CPU, GPU, platform (motherboard/memory), fans & various add-in devices, then buy a PSU with large enough power rails to provide that power. Simply combining the average power draw for a CPU and GPU is not enough, as a CPU may pull far less power on average when gaming, but the amount of power pulled when an intense instruction set such as AVX is used may far exceed that value. Simply adding a 200W buffer will not suffice, and this does not factor capacitor aging or peak spikes in power consumption, depending on the specific components used. My recommendation is to determine the total amount of power you are going to consume (on average), then factor in PSU efficiency levels and buy a PSU that lets you achieve those levels under load. Understand that PSU's operate at different levels of efficiency depending on what percentage of their capacitance is being used. Let's use the EVGA SuperNOVA 1000W G3 as an example. Here, you can see the efficiency level of the SuperNOVA 1000 G3 at various load levels. At 10% load, the PSU is 86% efficient. This means if your system is only using 10% of the 1000w PSU (100W), you'll only achieve 86.39% efficiency. At 20% load, this efficiency changes to 90.04%. This means if your system is using a 200W load, you'll be 4% more efficient than what you were at a 100W load. At 50% load, you can see efficiency improve to 91.43%, and starts to trail off again from there. I personally recommend taking your average power consumption and doubling it, just to maintain this peak 50% load efficiency, as it's often the most efficient load level for modern PSU's. For example: If your average power is 300W, a 600W PSU will let you run at 50% load, giving you the most efficiency. This also gives you a large enough buffer to factor in capacitor aging over time, and gives you the added benefit of quieter operation as most PSU's are designed to operate their fan based on internal temperature, and the less power used = less heat generated. For more information on your specific PSU efficiency, please visit https://www.plugloadsolutions.com/80PlusPowerSupplies.aspx and look for your power supply. Does this mean you NEED a 600W PSU for a system pulling 300W of power? Absolutely not. You can use various tips & tricks from the ATX/PCI-SIG specs to help determine "worst case" power consumption, and buy a PSU to be within that power envelope. For example: A 6 pin connector on a graphics card is designed to safely handle 75W of power. An 8 pin connector on a graphics card is designed to handle 150W of power. The PCIe slot itself is designed to provide up to 75% of power. This information helps us understand the potential peak power consumption of a card if it adheres to ATX/PCI-SIG specifications. The examples below assume that the cards have not been shunt modded, or have not had their VBIOS power limits modified. Example 1: You have a PCIe graphics card with a 6 pin connector. You are uncertain of it's real power consumption, but you know the 6 pin connector can safely handle 75W of power and the PCIe slot itself can do another 75W. This means that the card will not consume more than 150W of power as long as it adheres to the aforementioned specifications.  Example 2: You have a PCIe graphics card with a 6 pin connector and 8 pin connector. You know the slot will provide up to 75W of power, the 6 pin connector will provide another 75W and the 8 pin another 150W. You can safely determine that the card will not exceed 300W of power, and can plan your PSU decisions around such information. The information listed above is why I consider your PSU wattage recommendations inaccurate, as it has nothing to do with graphics generations, and everything to do with the power consumption of your components as a whole. Understand that power efficiency typically improves throughout each generation. A graphics card being a GTX 900 series doesn't automatically mean it consumes less power. A 980 Ti will consume just as much power as a 1080 Ti/2080 Ti, despite offering significantly less performance. We can never make broad recommendations of product generations alone, we must always factor in the power consumption of each component when making PSU recommendations. Luckily, we have third party review outlets to rely on for this information. It's always a good idea to check multiple sources for reviews on power consumption for the components you are interested in. Once you have a general understanding for the power they consume, pick the best PSU you can afford that meets those requirements and you'll be fine. BubbleMax said: 5th: What memory should an average HD to 4K gaming rig should use? As of the last 5 to 10 years MHZ in terms of gaming at least frequencies do matter.        5A: General consumers only really need a max for now about 16 GB MAX and probably no higher than 3000Mhz. (I suggest 16GB cause generally Chrome enjoys large amounts of RAM and if you want extra applications you will need the extra ram capacity or run the risk of noticeable lagging.)       5B: Gamers will if they can afford it are probably the main people/consumer who will notice mhz influence what they do in terms of ram. Generally as a gamer you probably will want a min of 16 GB's and a max of 32 GB's. With mhz 3200 to 3600 you can expect for most AAA intense games a 10 to 20 FPS increase from their lower counterparts just cause of frequency. Bewarned any higher and the performance plateau's quite a bit. (Also with gaming more RAM is ALWAYS BETTER THAN LESS its one way to mitigate memory leaks) In response to 5A: This is once again a broad generalization that can be worrisome without defining what a "general consumer" is. I am also worried about the "no higher than 3000Mhz" recommendation as there is no explanation provided as to why this would be less beneficial or potentially detrimental to their system. In response to 5B: I do not understand the recommendations here. The minimum amount of RAM depends entirely on the games/applications the individual gamer is planning to use. To say they NEED at least 16GB of RAM is not accurate. Having more would definitely be beneficial in the long run, but it's by no means a requirement. Understand there are many different types of games and types of gamers out there, not all of them have the same system requirements to engage in the content they enjoy. We cannot treat all gamers with a blanket generalization, we need to make sure we clarify the scenarios in which they'll need more memory and why it's beneficial for them to make that investment. I am also concerned with the performance claims made. There exists no specific number that one can attach to the performance benefits of faster memory because it changes depending on the situation. The performance benefit of faster memory will depend entirely on how much CPU overhead exists in a given situation, and whether it's I/O based. As the bottleneck shifts from the CPU to the GPU (4K gaming being an easy example), you'll see far less of a performance benefit, if any. It's also not just memory frequency at play. Understand that memory frequency is only a piece of the equation. True memory performance is dictated by a combination of your processors memory controller, the trace topology of your motherboard, the specific RAM integrated circuits (IC's) in your DIMM's and a combination of the aforementioned frequency of your ram alongside your primary, secondary and tertiary timings. All of this factors in to the potential performance of your memory, and as a result, the potential performance of your applications when used in conjunction with said memory.  The final claim in this section that states "gaming with more RAM is ALWAYS BETTER THAN LESS" is also inaccurate. Having more RAM isn't a solution to applications suffering from a memory leak, it's more of a band-aid. It also has the negative side effect of putting added stress on your processors memory controller, reducing the max memory frequency you'll be able to achieve while maintaining stability.  I hope that some of the information I've provided helps clarify things. Understand that I have great respect for your desire to help others, and I want to assist in that endeavor to make sure the information provided is as accurate and as complete as possible. I firmly believe that the information we provide is at its best when we fully understand the subject matter, and I hope you share my same desire to improve our understanding of this hobby we enjoy. The main point was just to get people not to think about getting higher than what a min spec build for gaming and to go for more not less when it comes to thinking a PC build in general. If you want to make or chose parts for a build shoot a tier higher than you might think is a bare min budget cause then you can kill two birds with one PC. Kind of idea. Cause it would stink as a consumer and as a gamer to buy a PC that is under powered for a game app and then have to go back and spend even more money for what you could have spent from the start. Essentially a 300 gaming PC build could end up being a return to the store and having to deal with the hassle of rebuilding and or re-selecting parts and then also the hassle of credit card banks possibly thinking the purchase was fraudulent.  As to the memory part about more being better well memory can also wear out over time so having a bit more could allow memory to compensate if bad sectors develop. Giving the users an extra maybe 1 or even 4 months to come up with a replacement. Where as shooting for the bare minimum could mean the whole stick just fails cause there isn't anymore to page. And as to the max speed of ram ideally that idea is to give the CPU the option to run at max speed. If it can and wants to its meant like having a bit more memory to give room to fluctuate if its needed. My tips were made with the intent of a buyer would want to set up their PC build with the intent it might last more than one generation of mid to high level entertainment that could also hybidize into being slightly future proofed as well.  And to clarify what general consumer would mean someone who is looking for a build just to use for normal non gamer or enthusiast usage. But suggest maybe paying the couple extra hundred dollars so the PC will be still good even if the parts start to wear down due to heavy and or long usage. Like surfing the web and having the habit of having too many tabs. In google chrome, if you know you have this habit it would be best to then recognize the habit and then plan in the pc build to compensate. The idea with the general consumer tips is to build a PC that will last, perform well and not have them finding another PC in 1-3 years. Cause buying basic mass produced PC's can end up costing in the long term as much or even in rare cases more if you are buying upwards in terms of new parts every new hardware to price generation. As new more efficient hardware often is more expensive to equal the improved performance.  But still thanks for clarifying the finer details. @TSMichaelB 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook TSMichaelB admin July 2020 edited July 2020 BubbleMax said: TSMichaelB said: @BubbleMax, I genuinely appreciate your desire to help others with their system builds and decision making process, however it's important that we make sure the information provided is accurate. Please see my comments below on various pieces of your post. For added clarification, I've provided sources to help better understand my points. BubbleMax said: 3rd:If Gaming understand that its the CPU is what tells the GPU what to do and how much power to use to reach the graphical power needed for the graphical setting. So pick a CPU that is powerful enough for the GPU so you don't bottle neck one or both. That means sticking generally if gaming with a i7 or better. This goes with its Ryzen equivalent if you intend to play AAA new games. They NEED the hyperthreading/multithreads.                3A: DON'T buy a over powered GPU and pair it with a under powered CPU.        3B: i3 and i5 and ryzen equivalents are best matched probably with 900 and lower GTX's         3C: i7's and i9's have hyperthreading and their Ryzen equivalents multi-threading a pretty much must for HD AAA graphically intense gaming in general and are easily match with any 1000's  to 2000 GTX series cards and their AMD equivalents The information bolded above is an example of inaccurate information. In response to point 3: First and foremost, the CPU does not tell the graphics card how much power it should be using for any given setting. The CPU handles various tasks such as AI processing/calculation (most notably in RTS games or titles with NPC characters), netcode for online games (where your position is relative to your fellow players on the client side of things), some physics elements, audio processing, and most importantly; draw calls. Draw calls are responsible for telling the graphics card about everything that is to be rendered on-screen. This can range from various textures to specific objects and their locations. To fully understand the significance of Draw Calls, let's use Skyrim as an example. You walk into a building, ready to throw a bucket atop the head of some poor NPC in an attempt to loot them unnoticed. Sadly, your inventory is full, so you drop the 400 sweet rolls you were hoarding in your inventory like a lunatic, only for all of them to fall to the ground at once the moment you exit the paused inventory menu. This initial lag spike, one often blames on the GPU, but would likely end up being your CPU. You see, your CPU must now account for the object location and textures of all of these sweet rolls, and tell your GPU where they are located, so that it has the data to know what to draw. The more draw calls in a scene, the more stress on your CPU. For more information on how draw calls work (and the different methods to handle draw calls from an engine level), I recommend taking a look at Unity's page on the subject: https://docs.unity3d.com/Manual/DrawCallBatching.html. Some of the different CPU tasks listed above can be parallelized to be processed more efficiently with more CPU cores which is why you notice an improvement with higher core processors or processors with Hyperthreading/Simultaneous Multi-Threading. Some however, can't be parallelized, or only parallelized to a certain extent, leaving you bound by the speed of your individual cores. This is known as Amdahl's law. More information on this subject can be found here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amdahl%27s_law This is also why your mention of gaming needing an i7 or better, or that they "need" Hypertreading/SMT is simply not true. The number of cores/threads one needs depends entirely on the game they are playing/the engine it uses. For a better understanding of performance scaling across processors, I strongly advise taking a look at GamersNexus CPU testing methdology: https://www.gamersnexus.net/guides/3577-cpu-test-methodology-unveil-for-2020-compile-gaming-more#!/ccomment-comment=10013212. They include a fantastic suite of benchmarks, ranging from compiling to gaming and shows performance scaling through a wide range of processors.  BubbleMax said: 4th: Power supplies, as a general rule safest to first estimate the average power draw for the CPU + GPU. Then as a general rule you want to over shoot that minimum amount of wattage usage by 200. Its better safe than sorry when it comes to powering a PC.        4A: This means for for 900 and lower GPU's and  paired with i5 or i3 and or Ryzen equivalent CPU's probably a in the 500 to 550 Watt PSU's        4B: For 1000  to 2000 series GPU's and their CPU partners on most motherboards will use 650 to a 750 watt PSU       4C:And only in rare cases should anyone consider 850 or 1000 watt PSU's unless your making a 3K to 6K or higher usd build. That is using REALLY premium parts.  These PSU recommendations are worrisome as they are far too broad, and can be potentially harmful to the components of others that follow this advice as a general rule of thumb. There is only one way to correctly determine the amount of power you need. This requires researching the power consumption of the components you intend to purchase such as CPU, GPU, platform (motherboard/memory), fans & various add-in devices, then buy a PSU with large enough power rails to provide that power. Simply combining the average power draw for a CPU and GPU is not enough, as a CPU may pull far less power on average when gaming, but the amount of power pulled when an intense instruction set such as AVX is used may far exceed that value. Simply adding a 200W buffer will not suffice, and this does not factor capacitor aging or peak spikes in power consumption, depending on the specific components used. My recommendation is to determine the total amount of power you are going to consume (on average), then factor in PSU efficiency levels and buy a PSU that lets you achieve those levels under load. Understand that PSU's operate at different levels of efficiency depending on what percentage of their capacitance is being used. Let's use the EVGA SuperNOVA 1000W G3 as an example. Here, you can see the efficiency level of the SuperNOVA 1000 G3 at various load levels. At 10% load, the PSU is 86% efficient. This means if your system is only using 10% of the 1000w PSU (100W), you'll only achieve 86.39% efficiency. At 20% load, this efficiency changes to 90.04%. This means if your system is using a 200W load, you'll be 4% more efficient than what you were at a 100W load. At 50% load, you can see efficiency improve to 91.43%, and starts to trail off again from there. I personally recommend taking your average power consumption and doubling it, just to maintain this peak 50% load efficiency, as it's often the most efficient load level for modern PSU's. For example: If your average power is 300W, a 600W PSU will let you run at 50% load, giving you the most efficiency. This also gives you a large enough buffer to factor in capacitor aging over time, and gives you the added benefit of quieter operation as most PSU's are designed to operate their fan based on internal temperature, and the less power used = less heat generated. For more information on your specific PSU efficiency, please visit https://www.plugloadsolutions.com/80PlusPowerSupplies.aspx and look for your power supply. Does this mean you NEED a 600W PSU for a system pulling 300W of power? Absolutely not. You can use various tips & tricks from the ATX/PCI-SIG specs to help determine "worst case" power consumption, and buy a PSU to be within that power envelope. For example: A 6 pin connector on a graphics card is designed to safely handle 75W of power. An 8 pin connector on a graphics card is designed to handle 150W of power. The PCIe slot itself is designed to provide up to 75% of power. This information helps us understand the potential peak power consumption of a card if it adheres to ATX/PCI-SIG specifications. The examples below assume that the cards have not been shunt modded, or have not had their VBIOS power limits modified. Example 1: You have a PCIe graphics card with a 6 pin connector. You are uncertain of it's real power consumption, but you know the 6 pin connector can safely handle 75W of power and the PCIe slot itself can do another 75W. This means that the card will not consume more than 150W of power as long as it adheres to the aforementioned specifications.  Example 2: You have a PCIe graphics card with a 6 pin connector and 8 pin connector. You know the slot will provide up to 75W of power, the 6 pin connector will provide another 75W and the 8 pin another 150W. You can safely determine that the card will not exceed 300W of power, and can plan your PSU decisions around such information. The information listed above is why I consider your PSU wattage recommendations inaccurate, as it has nothing to do with graphics generations, and everything to do with the power consumption of your components as a whole. Understand that power efficiency typically improves throughout each generation. A graphics card being a GTX 900 series doesn't automatically mean it consumes less power. A 980 Ti will consume just as much power as a 1080 Ti/2080 Ti, despite offering significantly less performance. We can never make broad recommendations of product generations alone, we must always factor in the power consumption of each component when making PSU recommendations. Luckily, we have third party review outlets to rely on for this information. It's always a good idea to check multiple sources for reviews on power consumption for the components you are interested in. Once you have a general understanding for the power they consume, pick the best PSU you can afford that meets those requirements and you'll be fine. BubbleMax said: 5th: What memory should an average HD to 4K gaming rig should use? As of the last 5 to 10 years MHZ in terms of gaming at least frequencies do matter.        5A: General consumers only really need a max for now about 16 GB MAX and probably no higher than 3000Mhz. (I suggest 16GB cause generally Chrome enjoys large amounts of RAM and if you want extra applications you will need the extra ram capacity or run the risk of noticeable lagging.)       5B: Gamers will if they can afford it are probably the main people/consumer who will notice mhz influence what they do in terms of ram. Generally as a gamer you probably will want a min of 16 GB's and a max of 32 GB's. With mhz 3200 to 3600 you can expect for most AAA intense games a 10 to 20 FPS increase from their lower counterparts just cause of frequency. Bewarned any higher and the performance plateau's quite a bit. (Also with gaming more RAM is ALWAYS BETTER THAN LESS its one way to mitigate memory leaks) In response to 5A: This is once again a broad generalization that can be worrisome without defining what a "general consumer" is. I am also worried about the "no higher than 3000Mhz" recommendation as there is no explanation provided as to why this would be less beneficial or potentially detrimental to their system. In response to 5B: I do not understand the recommendations here. The minimum amount of RAM depends entirely on the games/applications the individual gamer is planning to use. To say they NEED at least 16GB of RAM is not accurate. Having more would definitely be beneficial in the long run, but it's by no means a requirement. Understand there are many different types of games and types of gamers out there, not all of them have the same system requirements to engage in the content they enjoy. We cannot treat all gamers with a blanket generalization, we need to make sure we clarify the scenarios in which they'll need more memory and why it's beneficial for them to make that investment. I am also concerned with the performance claims made. There exists no specific number that one can attach to the performance benefits of faster memory because it changes depending on the situation. The performance benefit of faster memory will depend entirely on how much CPU overhead exists in a given situation, and whether it's I/O based. As the bottleneck shifts from the CPU to the GPU (4K gaming being an easy example), you'll see far less of a performance benefit, if any. It's also not just memory frequency at play. Understand that memory frequency is only a piece of the equation. True memory performance is dictated by a combination of your processors memory controller, the trace topology of your motherboard, the specific RAM integrated circuits (IC's) in your DIMM's and a combination of the aforementioned frequency of your ram alongside your primary, secondary and tertiary timings. All of this factors in to the potential performance of your memory, and as a result, the potential performance of your applications when used in conjunction with said memory.  The final claim in this section that states "gaming with more RAM is ALWAYS BETTER THAN LESS" is also inaccurate. Having more RAM isn't a solution to applications suffering from a memory leak, it's more of a band-aid. It also has the negative side effect of putting added stress on your processors memory controller, reducing the max memory frequency you'll be able to achieve while maintaining stability.  I hope that some of the information I've provided helps clarify things. Understand that I have great respect for your desire to help others, and I want to assist in that endeavor to make sure the information provided is as accurate and as complete as possible. I firmly believe that the information we provide is at its best when we fully understand the subject matter, and I hope you share my same desire to improve our understanding of this hobby we enjoy. As to the memory part about more being better well memory can also wear out over time so having a bit more could allow memory to compensate if bad sectors develop. Giving the users an extra maybe 1 or even 4 months to come up with a replacement. Where as shooting for the bare minimum could mean the whole stick just fails cause there isn't anymore to page. And as to the max speed of ram ideally that idea is to give the CPU the option to run at max speed. If it can and wants to its meant like having a bit more memory to give room to fluctuate if its needed. My tips were made with the intent of a buyer would want to set up their PC build with the intent it might last more than one generation of mid to high level entertainment that could also hybidize into being slightly future proofed as well.  And to clarify what general consumer would mean someone who is looking for a build just to use for normal non gamer or enthusiast usage. But suggest maybe paying the couple extra hundred dollars so the PC will be still good even if the parts start to wear down due to heavy and or long usage. Like surfing the web and having the habit of having too many tabs. In google chrome, if you know you have this habit it would be best to then recognize the habit and then plan in the pc build to compensate. The idea with the general consumer tips is to build a PC that will last, perform well and not have them finding another PC in 1-3 years. Cause buying basic mass produced PC's can end up costing in the long term as much or even in rare cases more if you are buying upwards in terms of new parts every new hardware to price generation. As new more efficient hardware often is more expensive to equal the improved performance.  I want to provide some additional clarification on what I've bolded above, as this is not accurate as well. Memory has no "sectors". It's an array of capacitors (and a paired transistor per bit) that are either on or off, charged or discharged, representing a binary 1 or 0 for the bit. You might be mistaking "sectors" with the various rows, addresses and columns, but in consumer memory, you can't have a portion of your memory not work and still have a functioning system. The memory controller of consumer processors are not designed to detect and ignore bits and pieces of broken memory, nor would it be wise to operate in an attempt to skip over portions of your memory. Even ECC memory is designed to correct single bit corruption, not skip over entire "sectors" of memory. Regardless of your capacity, if you have a failing DIMM, you will experience instability. More memory won't prolong your stability, it won't allow you to operate for an extended duration. You will crash the moment your memory controller attempts to interact with your unstable DIMM. Wikipedia, while not my favorite source, has an excellent article on how DRAM works in general: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dynamic_random-access_memory.  To clarify the point of my posts in this thread, I don't want you think I am ungrateful for your desire to help others in our community. On the contrary, we need more altruistic folks like yourself that are willing to go out of their way to help others enjoy this industry that we are all enthusiastic about. I just want to make sure that in doing so, we are providing the most accurate information that we can to help further promote a better understanding for everyone trying to learn and get into this industry.BubbleMax said: BubbleMax said: TSMichaelB said: @BubbleMax, I genuinely appreciate your desire to help others with their system builds and decision making process, however it's important that we make sure the information provided is accurate. Please see my comments below on various pieces of your post. For added clarification, I've provided sources to help better understand my points. BubbleMax said: 3rd:If Gaming understand that its the CPU is what tells the GPU what to do and how much power to use to reach the graphical power needed for the graphical setting. So pick a CPU that is powerful enough for the GPU so you don't bottle neck one or both. That means sticking generally if gaming with a i7 or better. This goes with its Ryzen equivalent if you intend to play AAA new games. They NEED the hyperthreading/multithreads.                3A: DON'T buy a over powered GPU and pair it with a under powered CPU.        3B: i3 and i5 and ryzen equivalents are best matched probably with 900 and lower GTX's         3C: i7's and i9's have hyperthreading and their Ryzen equivalents multi-threading a pretty much must for HD AAA graphically intense gaming in general and are easily match with any 1000's  to 2000 GTX series cards and their AMD equivalents The information bolded above is an example of inaccurate information. In response to point 3: First and foremost, the CPU does not tell the graphics card how much power it should be using for any given setting. The CPU handles various tasks such as AI processing/calculation (most notably in RTS games or titles with NPC characters), netcode for online games (where your position is relative to your fellow players on the client side of things), some physics elements, audio processing, and most importantly; draw calls. Draw calls are responsible for telling the graphics card about everything that is to be rendered on-screen. This can range from various textures to specific objects and their locations. To fully understand the significance of Draw Calls, let's use Skyrim as an example. You walk into a building, ready to throw a bucket atop the head of some poor NPC in an attempt to loot them unnoticed. Sadly, your inventory is full, so you drop the 400 sweet rolls you were hoarding in your inventory like a lunatic, only for all of them to fall to the ground at once the moment you exit the paused inventory menu. This initial lag spike, one often blames on the GPU, but would likely end up being your CPU. You see, your CPU must now account for the object location and textures of all of these sweet rolls, and tell your GPU where they are located, so that it has the data to know what to draw. The more draw calls in a scene, the more stress on your CPU. For more information on how draw calls work (and the different methods to handle draw calls from an engine level), I recommend taking a look at Unity's page on the subject: https://docs.unity3d.com/Manual/DrawCallBatching.html. Some of the different CPU tasks listed above can be parallelized to be processed more efficiently with more CPU cores which is why you notice an improvement with higher core processors or processors with Hyperthreading/Simultaneous Multi-Threading. Some however, can't be parallelized, or only parallelized to a certain extent, leaving you bound by the speed of your individual cores. This is known as Amdahl's law. More information on this subject can be found here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amdahl%27s_law This is also why your mention of gaming needing an i7 or better, or that they "need" Hypertreading/SMT is simply not true. The number of cores/threads one needs depends entirely on the game they are playing/the engine it uses. For a better understanding of performance scaling across processors, I strongly advise taking a look at GamersNexus CPU testing methdology: https://www.gamersnexus.net/guides/3577-cpu-test-methodology-unveil-for-2020-compile-gaming-more#!/ccomment-comment=10013212. They include a fantastic suite of benchmarks, ranging from compiling to gaming and shows performance scaling through a wide range of processors.  BubbleMax said: 4th: Power supplies, as a general rule safest to first estimate the average power draw for the CPU + GPU. Then as a general rule you want to over shoot that minimum amount of wattage usage by 200. Its better safe than sorry when it comes to powering a PC.        4A: This means for for 900 and lower GPU's and  paired with i5 or i3 and or Ryzen equivalent CPU's probably a in the 500 to 550 Watt PSU's        4B: For 1000  to 2000 series GPU's and their CPU partners on most motherboards will use 650 to a 750 watt PSU       4C:And only in rare cases should anyone consider 850 or 1000 watt PSU's unless your making a 3K to 6K or higher usd build. That is using REALLY premium parts.  These PSU recommendations are worrisome as they are far too broad, and can be potentially harmful to the components of others that follow this advice as a general rule of thumb. There is only one way to correctly determine the amount of power you need. This requires researching the power consumption of the components you intend to purchase such as CPU, GPU, platform (motherboard/memory), fans & various add-in devices, then buy a PSU with large enough power rails to provide that power. Simply combining the average power draw for a CPU and GPU is not enough, as a CPU may pull far less power on average when gaming, but the amount of power pulled when an intense instruction set such as AVX is used may far exceed that value. Simply adding a 200W buffer will not suffice, and this does not factor capacitor aging or peak spikes in power consumption, depending on the specific components used. My recommendation is to determine the total amount of power you are going to consume (on average), then factor in PSU efficiency levels and buy a PSU that lets you achieve those levels under load. Understand that PSU's operate at different levels of efficiency depending on what percentage of their capacitance is being used. Let's use the EVGA SuperNOVA 1000W G3 as an example. Here, you can see the efficiency level of the SuperNOVA 1000 G3 at various load levels. At 10% load, the PSU is 86% efficient. This means if your system is only using 10% of the 1000w PSU (100W), you'll only achieve 86.39% efficiency. At 20% load, this efficiency changes to 90.04%. This means if your system is using a 200W load, you'll be 4% more efficient than what you were at a 100W load. At 50% load, you can see efficiency improve to 91.43%, and starts to trail off again from there. I personally recommend taking your average power consumption and doubling it, just to maintain this peak 50% load efficiency, as it's often the most efficient load level for modern PSU's. For example: If your average power is 300W, a 600W PSU will let you run at 50% load, giving you the most efficiency. This also gives you a large enough buffer to factor in capacitor aging over time, and gives you the added benefit of quieter operation as most PSU's are designed to operate their fan based on internal temperature, and the less power used = less heat generated. For more information on your specific PSU efficiency, please visit https://www.plugloadsolutions.com/80PlusPowerSupplies.aspx and look for your power supply. Does this mean you NEED a 600W PSU for a system pulling 300W of power? Absolutely not. You can use various tips & tricks from the ATX/PCI-SIG specs to help determine "worst case" power consumption, and buy a PSU to be within that power envelope. For example: A 6 pin connector on a graphics card is designed to safely handle 75W of power. An 8 pin connector on a graphics card is designed to handle 150W of power. The PCIe slot itself is designed to provide up to 75% of power. This information helps us understand the potential peak power consumption of a card if it adheres to ATX/PCI-SIG specifications. The examples below assume that the cards have not been shunt modded, or have not had their VBIOS power limits modified. Example 1: You have a PCIe graphics card with a 6 pin connector. You are uncertain of it's real power consumption, but you know the 6 pin connector can safely handle 75W of power and the PCIe slot itself can do another 75W. This means that the card will not consume more than 150W of power as long as it adheres to the aforementioned specifications.  Example 2: You have a PCIe graphics card with a 6 pin connector and 8 pin connector. You know the slot will provide up to 75W of power, the 6 pin connector will provide another 75W and the 8 pin another 150W. You can safely determine that the card will not exceed 300W of power, and can plan your PSU decisions around such information. The information listed above is why I consider your PSU wattage recommendations inaccurate, as it has nothing to do with graphics generations, and everything to do with the power consumption of your components as a whole. Understand that power efficiency typically improves throughout each generation. A graphics card being a GTX 900 series doesn't automatically mean it consumes less power. A 980 Ti will consume just as much power as a 1080 Ti/2080 Ti, despite offering significantly less performance. We can never make broad recommendations of product generations alone, we must always factor in the power consumption of each component when making PSU recommendations. Luckily, we have third party review outlets to rely on for this information. It's always a good idea to check multiple sources for reviews on power consumption for the components you are interested in. Once you have a general understanding for the power they consume, pick the best PSU you can afford that meets those requirements and you'll be fine. BubbleMax said: 5th: What memory should an average HD to 4K gaming rig should use? As of the last 5 to 10 years MHZ in terms of gaming at least frequencies do matter.        5A: General consumers only really need a max for now about 16 GB MAX and probably no higher than 3000Mhz. (I suggest 16GB cause generally Chrome enjoys large amounts of RAM and if you want extra applications you will need the extra ram capacity or run the risk of noticeable lagging.)       5B: Gamers will if they can afford it are probably the main people/consumer who will notice mhz influence what they do in terms of ram. Generally as a gamer you probably will want a min of 16 GB's and a max of 32 GB's. With mhz 3200 to 3600 you can expect for most AAA intense games a 10 to 20 FPS increase from their lower counterparts just cause of frequency. Bewarned any higher and the performance plateau's quite a bit. (Also with gaming more RAM is ALWAYS BETTER THAN LESS its one way to mitigate memory leaks) In response to 5A: This is once again a broad generalization that can be worrisome without defining what a "general consumer" is. I am also worried about the "no higher than 3000Mhz" recommendation as there is no explanation provided as to why this would be less beneficial or potentially detrimental to their system. In response to 5B: I do not understand the recommendations here. The minimum amount of RAM depends entirely on the games/applications the individual gamer is planning to use. To say they NEED at least 16GB of RAM is not accurate. Having more would definitely be beneficial in the long run, but it's by no means a requirement. Understand there are many different types of games and types of gamers out there, not all of them have the same system requirements to engage in the content they enjoy. We cannot treat all gamers with a blanket generalization, we need to make sure we clarify the scenarios in which they'll need more memory and why it's beneficial for them to make that investment. I am also concerned with the performance claims made. There exists no specific number that one can attach to the performance benefits of faster memory because it changes depending on the situation. The performance benefit of faster memory will depend entirely on how much CPU overhead exists in a given situation, and whether it's I/O based. As the bottleneck shifts from the CPU to the GPU (4K gaming being an easy example), you'll see far less of a performance benefit, if any. It's also not just memory frequency at play. Understand that memory frequency is only a piece of the equation. True memory performance is dictated by a combination of your processors memory controller, the trace topology of your motherboard, the specific RAM integrated circuits (IC's) in your DIMM's and a combination of the aforementioned frequency of your ram alongside your primary, secondary and tertiary timings. All of this factors in to the potential performance of your memory, and as a result, the potential performance of your applications when used in conjunction with said memory.  The final claim in this section that states "gaming with more RAM is ALWAYS BETTER THAN LESS" is also inaccurate. Having more RAM isn't a solution to applications suffering from a memory leak, it's more of a band-aid. It also has the negative side effect of putting added stress on your processors memory controller, reducing the max memory frequency you'll be able to achieve while maintaining stability.  I hope that some of the information I've provided helps clarify things. Understand that I have great respect for your desire to help others, and I want to assist in that endeavor to make sure the information provided is as accurate and as complete as possible. I firmly believe that the information we provide is at its best when we fully understand the subject matter, and I hope you share my same desire to improve our understanding of this hobby we enjoy. The main point was just to get people not to think about getting higher than what a min spec build for gaming and to go for more not less when it comes to thinking a PC build in general. If you want to make or chose parts for a build shoot a tier higher than you might think is a bare min budget cause then you can kill two birds with one PC. Kind of idea. Cause it would stink as a consumer and as a gamer to buy a PC that is under powered for a game app and then have to go back and spend even more money for what you could have spent from the start. Essentially a 300 gaming PC build could end up being a return to the store and having to deal with the hassle of rebuilding and or re-selecting parts and then also the hassle of credit card banks possibly thinking the purchase was fraudulent.  As to the memory part about more being better well memory can also wear out over time so having a bit more could allow memory to compensate if bad sectors develop. Giving the users an extra maybe 1 or even 4 months to come up with a replacement. Where as shooting for the bare minimum could mean the whole stick just fails cause there isn't anymore to page. And as to the max speed of ram ideally that idea is to give the CPU the option to run at max speed. If it can and wants to its meant like having a bit more memory to give room to fluctuate if its needed. My tips were made with the intent of a buyer would want to set up their PC build with the intent it might last more than one generation of mid to high level entertainment that could also hybidize into being slightly future proofed as well.  And to clarify what general consumer would mean someone who is looking for a build just to use for normal non gamer or enthusiast usage. But suggest maybe paying the couple extra hundred dollars so the PC will be still good even if the parts start to wear down due to heavy and or long usage. Like surfing the web and having the habit of having too many tabs. In google chrome, if you know you have this habit it would be best to then recognize the habit and then plan in the pc build to compensate. The idea with the general consumer tips is to build a PC that will last, perform well and not have them finding another PC in 1-3 years. Cause buying basic mass produced PC's can end up costing in the long term as much or even in rare cases more if you are buying upwards in terms of new parts every new hardware to price generation. As new more efficient hardware often is more expensive to equal the improved performance.  But still thanks for clarifying the finer details. @TSMichaelB It's been a pleasure, thank you for your continued devotion to the community. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook BubbleMax MN ✭ July 2020 edited July 2020 BubbleMax said: Ichthus said: So I have to say, I'm pretty confused by your PSU and CPU recommendations.  I dislike making sweeping recommendations for an entire series of video cards. Within each series of video card there's a wide range of performance tiers and different power requirements. A GTX 980ti is going to have higher power draw than an RTX 2060 even though they're part of a different series. You can run a GTX 1650 Super with a 400W PSU without any problems. While I do think it's a good rule of thumb to recommend a 650W PSU, that's because 650W is enough to run basically anything except a dual GPU system or a system with an extremely high power draw CPU (Intel xtreme series, threadrippers, possibly heavily overclocked i7/i9 CPUs), NOT because of when your video card was made. 850W is overkill in any system that isn't using multiple GPUs.  I also have to question your recommendation specifically for an i7 for gaming. If you're just gaming you don't need more than a Ryzen 5 or Intel i5. The i5-10600k is nearly identical in performance to i7 and i9 parts in gaming despite it's core disadvantage. Even modern AAA titles still aren't good at utilizing all those extra cores and threads yet. Even on a budget modern CPUs are so capable that they won't be bottlenecked by anything except the 2080 Supers/2080 Ti type cards, even in AAA titles. You can pair a 3300X with something like an RTX 2060 Super or 2070 Super and it will be just fine. I feel like this also ignores how important your GPU is for your FPS. A Ryzen 3 3300X +2070 Super will outperform an i7-10700k + 2060 because of the GPU difference. If you overspend on your CPU, you're still going to have a bottleneck.  The point is were aging out of a entire era of cpu's and gpu's people who base of the bare minimum run the risk of buying a obsolete build.  And if devs start opting for min specs like Doom Eternal there will be needs for just about every budget PC owner to upgrade everything meaning redundantly buying an already pricy hardware. Best to spec a bit above what you think you need so you don't run into a brick wall if the games you might want to play aren't entirely out of your spec range.  And a bottleneck of a overpowered CPU to GPU  is not that bad as you still have the option to just buy the next biggest GPU then without having to catch up on a CPU AND GPU. Not to forget least you know the GPU is getting used to its absolute max. What good is a GPU that is only using half its power? If your specing right now for a i7-10700K or i9-10900K  your probably planning on the 2000 series card to keep you covered till the 3000 series cards and or the beefy Ampre cards.  As to the PSU concern you would think if someone has found the averages of benchmarked power draws for GPU's and CPU's they would notice in the data while researching the GPU's that the 980 Ti is a outlier. When it comes to the 900 series cards and maybe ask before buying like a smart consumer, ask "why out of the 900 to 2000 series GTX cards does a 980 TI draw so much power?" Well then someone could respond that the 980 Ti is a unique GPU as it was designed to need more power cause X and Y reasons and then said customer from there choose if they want to deal with the excess wattage or go with a less power hungry card. My posting was to get people to buy a PC with the right parts that it would be a build they would want to use actively and with near flawless performance. Even if at some parts maybe its not optimal but its better than low bottlenecking the system. If anything its better to over bottleneck and keep the ability to upgrade upwards without worrying the cost of upgrading 2 or 3 plus parts. Unless you got the funds to handle every 1-3 years to buy a 100 to 3K usd fancy brand new spanking PC and replace the entire unit. Which can be very costly if new gen pc's ever hit a point where every part is a premium price. Which means then the overall cost to buy a PC will be something that borders on being exotic.  The main point of this isn't to pick parts for a person but to make them aware if they want to keep up with technology improvements build the PC to be upgradeable and or future upgrade friendly. YES you can always go as "budget" as a consumer wants. But going budget build doesn't automatically mean your suddenly going to be doing much better than maybe medium or low for most games.  0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook TSMichaelB admin July 2020 BubbleMax said: BubbleMax said: Ichthus said: So I have to say, I'm pretty confused by your PSU and CPU recommendations.  I dislike making sweeping recommendations for an entire series of video cards. Within each series of video card there's a wide range of performance tiers and different power requirements. A GTX 980ti is going to have higher power draw than an RTX 2060 even though they're part of a different series. You can run a GTX 1650 Super with a 400W PSU without any problems. While I do think it's a good rule of thumb to recommend a 650W PSU, that's because 650W is enough to run basically anything except a dual GPU system or a system with an extremely high power draw CPU (Intel xtreme series, threadrippers, possibly heavily overclocked i7/i9 CPUs), NOT because of when your video card was made. 850W is overkill in any system that isn't using multiple GPUs.  I also have to question your recommendation specifically for an i7 for gaming. If you're just gaming you don't need more than a Ryzen 5 or Intel i5. The i5-10600k is nearly identical in performance to i7 and i9 parts in gaming despite it's core disadvantage. Even modern AAA titles still aren't good at utilizing all those extra cores and threads yet. Even on a budget modern CPUs are so capable that they won't be bottlenecked by anything except the 2080 Supers/2080 Ti type cards, even in AAA titles. You can pair a 3300X with something like an RTX 2060 Super or 2070 Super and it will be just fine. I feel like this also ignores how important your GPU is for your FPS. A Ryzen 3 3300X +2070 Super will outperform an i7-10700k + 2060 because of the GPU difference. If you overspend on your CPU, you're still going to have a bottleneck.  The point is were aging out of a entire era of cpu's and gpu's people who base of the bare minimum run the risk of buying a obsolete build.  And if devs start opting for min specs like Doom Eternal there will be needs for just about every budget PC owner to upgrade everything meaning redundantly buying an already pricy hardware. Best to spec a bit above what you think you need so you don't run into a brick wall if the games you might want to play aren't entirely out of your spec range.  And a bottleneck of a overpowered CPU to GPU  is not that bad as you still have the option to just buy the next biggest GPU then without having to catch up on a CPU AND GPU. Not to forget least you know the GPU is getting used to its absolute max. What good is a GPU that is only using half its power? If your specing right now for a i7-10700K or i9-10900K  your probably planning on the 2000 series card to keep you covered till the 3000 series cards and or the beefy Ampre cards.  As to the PSU concern you would think if someone has found the averages of benchmarked power draws for GPU's and CPU's they would notice in the data while researching the GPU's that the 980 Ti is a outlier. When it comes to the 900 series cards and maybe ask before buying like a smart consumer, ask "why out of the 900 to 2000 series GTX cards does a 980 TI draw so much power?" Well then someone could respond that the 980 Ti is a unique GPU as it was designed to need more power cause X and Y reasons and then said customer from there choose if they want to deal with the excess wattage or go with a less power hungry card. My posting was to get people to buy a PC with the right parts that it would be a build they would want to use actively and with near flawless performance. Even if at some parts maybe its not optimal but its better than low bottlenecking the system. If anything its better to over bottleneck and keep the ability to upgrade upwards without worrying the cost of upgrading 2 or 3 plus parts. Unless you got the funds to handle every 1-3 years to buy a 100 to 3K usd fancy brand new spanking PC and replace the entire unit. Which can be very costly if new gen pc's ever hit a point where every part is a premium price. Which means then the overall cost to buy a PC will be something that borders on being exotic.  The main point of this isn't to pick parts for a person but to make them aware if they want to keep up with technology improvements build the PC to be upgradeable and or future upgrade friendly. YES you can always go as "budget" as a consumer wants. But going budget build doesn't automatically mean your suddenly going to be doing much better than maybe medium or low for most games.  BubbleMax, the 980 Ti didn't draw more power because it was a "unique GPU". The 980 Ti drew 250W of power because that is the power envelope that it was designed to fulfill for the performance it offered. Just like the 1080 Ti draws roughly 250W of power, and the 2080 Ti draws roughly 250W of power. Nvidia's flagship gamer GPU's have basically drawn the same power since the Kepler refresh in 2013. Going back to the GTX 780 Ti, we can see it's listed at 250W: https://www.geforce.com/hardware/desktop-gpus/geforce-gtx-780-ti/specifications The GTX 980 Ti also lists 250W power consumption:  This trend continues on to Pascal's 1080 Ti: https://www.nvidia.com/en-sg/geforce/products/10series/geforce-gtx-1080-ti/ Even now, the RTX 2080 Ti consumes the same 250W of power, with the only exception being the Founders Edition PCB, with a slightly higher power limit: https://www.nvidia.com/en-us/geforce/graphics-cards/rtx-2080-ti/ This trend doesn't just hold true on the flagship gamer cards either. This was the same with the x50, x60, x70 and x80 cards. In fact, we can even see this trend decrease in the lower end cards, with the RTX 2070 consuming 55W less than the GTX 770, and only 25W more than the 1070. As we continue to see fabrication improvements, architectural changes and die shrinks, we will see improved power efficiency as well as an increase in performance as newer generation of hardware comes out. We cannot claim that the GTX 900 series consumes less power than the RTX 2000 series because that would be a false statement to make, especially when we factor in performance per watt. An RTX 2060 consumes only 160W of power, but out performs both the GTX 980 Ti (250W GPU) as well as the GTX 980 (165W GPU). Rather than advise people to choose their PSU's based on GPU generations, it's always best to advise them which PSU's to look for relative to their specific choice in graphics cards. That way, the information they get is accurate, and it better serves their understanding of how to discern between their choices going forward. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Categories 7K All Categories 1.1K The Blog 37 What's Trending 167 How to & Technical Guides 11 Computer Hardware 119 Software 3 Home Office 6 Networking Audio/Visual 2 Home Automation 16 3D Print Community Article Graphics Card assistance.. — Micro Center Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker {$smarty.capture.menu} Activity Categories Discussions Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker Home › Help Choosing Parts Graphics Card assistance.. rookie ✭ December 2020 in Help Choosing Parts With the shortage in graphics card there aren't many options so i found the RX 5500 XT and the RX 580 which one should I purchase. I am looking for 60 fps on high settings, would that even be possible with these cards?   0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Comments TSMikeW admin December 2020 Greetings @rookie They're pretty close, but the 5500 XT is the newer card and it's better overall. Unless there's a significant price difference, I'd go with the 5500 XT. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook rookie ✭ December 2020 thanks. i was able to find EVGA GeForce GTX 1660 XC Black Gaming 06G-P4-1161-KR DVI PCI Express 3.0 6GB Video Card. thoughts? @TSMikeW 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Ian admin December 2020 rookie said: thanks. i was able to find EVGA GeForce GTX 1660 XC Black Gaming 06G-P4-1161-KR DVI PCI Express 3.0 6GB Video Card. thoughts? @TSMikeW The 1660 is a better card overall between those two: https://gpu.userbenchmark.com/Compare/Nvidia-GTX-1660-vs-AMD-RX-5500-XT/4038vs4060  0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Categories 7K All Categories 1.1K The Blog 38 What's Trending 167 How to & Technical Guides 11 Computer Hardware 119 Software 3 Home Office 6 Networking Audio/Visual 2 Home Automation 16 3D Printers 10 Maker 16 PC Build Guides 96 Reviews & Buying Guides 34 Build Showcase 17 Contests 39 Past Contests 1K The Community 1.8K General Discussion 84 New Members 127 Consumer Tech 42 Prebuilt PCs and Laptops 78 Software 4 Audio/Visual 13 Networking & Security 1 Home Automation 2 Digital Photography 3 Content Creators 22 Hobby Boards & Projects 26 3D Printing 53 Retro Arcade/Gaming 86 All Other Tech 1.4K Store Information and Policy 52 Off Topic 6 Community Ideas & Feedback 114 Your Completed Builds 2.7K Build-Your-Own PC 1.7K Help Choosing Parts 227 Graphics Cards 175 CPUs, Memory, and Motherboards 63 Cases and Power Supplies 19 Air and Liquid Cooling 17 Monitors and Displays 30 Peripherals 10 All Other Parts 23 Featured Categories We love seeing what our customers build Submit photos and a description of your PC to our build showcase Submit Now Looking for a little inspiration? See other custom PC builds and get some ideas for what can be done View Build Showcase View builds by: AMD Processors Intel Processors RTX 3090 RTX 3080 RTX 2080 Ti RTX 2080 Super RTX 2070 Super RTX 2070 RTX 2060 Super Radeon RX 5700XT Radeon RX 5700 Air Cooled Liquid Cooled SAME DAY CUSTOM BUILD SERVICE If You Can Dream it, We Can Build it. Services starting at $149.99 More Details Micro Center Homepage Desktops Laptops Computer Parts Computer Accessories Custom PC Builder Build Showcase Networking Electronics 3D Printing Service, Upgrades & Repairs Laptop Battery Replacement Laptop Screen Repair Virus and Malware Removal Hard Drive Recovery and Backup Apple MacBook Repair Custom Built PCs Schedule an Appointment © Vanilla Foundation Theme 2021 Powered By Vanilla Community Article Video card suggestion for an ancient build — Micro Center Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker {$smarty.capture.menu} Activity Categories Discussions Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker Home › Help Choosing Parts Video card suggestion for an ancient build Mike_G ✭ April 2020 in Help Choosing Parts Hello, I need suggestion for a video card upgrade for an ancient build. Build is an I5-2500K with MOBO Gigabyte Z68AP-D3, video card NVIDIA GeForce GT 710, 2 22" monitors and 1 20" monitor. I use this PC for RDP connections and some local software (VMs, Office, etc.)… no need for games (especially graphic intensive). System handles current load very well. The most graphic intensive software I ever used with this build was a CAD for a small home project. System was able to handle it with the current configuration even if it was slow (it would run rendering all night which was fine for that project). The only requirement is the ability to connect at least 5 monitors (vs 3). I also need suggestion for 1 monitor. Unfortunately, budget is very limited (but options are very limited as well due to dated components)… I am saving for a new build in the next year or two. For card and 1 monitor (probably 24"), I would prefer not to exceed $300 - I may be able to stretch to $350 if needed. Thanks. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Comments TSTonyV admin April 2020 edited April 2020 Hello @Mike_G ! Welcome to the Community! If your GT710 does everything you have needed it to already, then the budget you have is way more than enough. Between $100-200 you have video cards like the RX570, 580, and 590, as well as the GTX 1650/Super and GTX 1660/Super/Ti variations which are all absolutely massive upgrades over the GT710. You could even go with a GT1030 as something of a "modern equivalent" to the 710. While it's much better than the 710, it's very underpowered compared to something like an RX570 and I'd be hard-pressed to recommend it. On a budget, your best options are going to be the RX570 and the GTX 1650 Super. The only question is what kind of power supply do you have? The 1650 Super is a little pricier and slightly more powerful than the RX570, but it does require less power so depending on what power supply is in your system, that will affect exactly which one I'd go for. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Mike_G ✭ April 2020 edited April 2020 Hello @TSTonyV, Thank you very much for your help. Power supply is 550W. The rest of the configuration is: - 1x 250Gb SSD; - 2x 1 Tb HDD; - 24 Gb RAM. Looking at the availability at the Micro Center store near me (MI), the only available cards they currently have in stock is https://www.microcenter.com/site/content/custom-pc-builder.aspx?load=171ceac1-6707-48ed-a77c-7102502f0b45 It looks like no GTX 1650 is reported as available there. Most of the cards are reported as supporting up to 4 monitors. The only one reported with 5 monitors support is the RX 580 (I know there was another RX580 with 5 monitors but, I guess, it is now out of stock). Would you suggest this one? I am also including some monitors with enough availability (10+) that should end up within the budget (or just over it). Which one is the best choice for the price? I forgot to mention that I usually spend long time in front of this system when I work from home (some days over 18 hours with an average of 12 hours). Of course, if there are better solutions to the ones selected, let me know. Thank you. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Categories 7K All Categories 1.1K The Blog 37 What's Trending 167 How to & Technical Guides 11 Computer Hardware 119 Software 3 Home Office 6 Networking Audio/Visual 2 Home Automation 16 3D Printers 10 Maker 16 PC Build Guides 96 Reviews & Buying Guides 34 Build Showcase 17 Contests 39 Past Contests 1K The Community 1.8K General Discussion 84 New Members 127 Consumer Tech 42 Prebuilt PCs and Laptops 78 Software 4 Audio/Visual 13 Networking & Security 1 Home Automation 2 Digital Photography 3 Content Creators 22 Hobby Boards & Projects 26 3D Printing 53 Retro Arcade/Gaming 86 All Other Tech 1.4K Store Information and Policy 52 Off Topic 6 Community Ideas & Feedback 114 Your Completed Builds 2.7K Build-Your-Own PC 1.7K Help Choosing Parts 227 Graphics Cards 175 CPUs, Memory, and Motherboards 63 Cases and Power Supplies 19 Air and Liquid Cooling 17 Monitors and Displays 30 Peripherals 10 All Other Parts 23 Featured Categories We love seeing what our customers build Submit photos and a description of your PC to our build showcase Submit Now Looking for a little inspiration? See other custom PC builds and get some ideas for what can be done View Build Showcase View builds by: AMD Processors Intel Processors RTX 3090 RTX 3080 RTX 2080 Ti RTX 2080 Super RTX 2070 Super RTX 2070 RTX 2060 Super Radeon RX 5700XT Radeon RX 5700 Air Cooled Liquid Cooled SAME DAY CUSTOM BUILD SERVICE If You Can Dream it, We Can Build it. Services starting at $149.99 More Details Micro Center Homepage Desktops Laptops Computer Parts Computer Accessories Custom PC Builder Build Showcase Networking Electronics 3D Printing Service, Upgrades & Repairs Laptop Battery Replacement Laptop Screen Repair Virus and Malware Removal Hard Drive Recovery and Backup Apple MacBook Repair Custom Built PCs Schedule an Appointment © Vanilla Foundation Theme 2021 Powered By Vanilla Community Article help choosing a laptop — Micro Center Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker {$smarty.capture.menu} Activity Categories Discussions Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker Home › General Discussion help choosing a laptop kgfPatsfan ✭ February 16 edited June 7 in General Discussion Hi, I need a new laptop and the only specs I can come up with are what I don't like about my current setup. That said: Windows 10 lightweight support internet gaming - specifically, tabletop simulator on Steam; my current laptop has a lot of lag despite a good internet connection in the house. (HP Envy M6) I will probably also want to cast from this machine good camera and mic - the camera on my work machine is blurry (Dell Vostro) backlit keyboard, ports to support wireless keyboard and mouse. i probably wont use a headset, as I hate having things on my ears. Dell offered me an Inspiron 15 5000 at $600 based on these "specs" I am not a super user, I no longer need to use my personal machine for work, and I really just want the few things I do to work well. i would prefer to be frugal, but my last laptop lasted 7 years, so I'd like to get something that will keep me going for awhile again. 1 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Comments LandShark admin February 16 edited February 16 Hello @kgfPatsfan I'd recommend a few different things, but your store's selection may vary. I'd recommend checking these out. Be sure to make sure that your store is selected at the top of the page. https://www.microcenter.com/search/search_results.aspx?Ntk=all&sortby=pricelow&N=4294967288+4294817517+4294817438+4294819898+4294820736+4294820632+4294808474+4294808800&myStore=false As for my recommendations, I'd suggest a couple of different things, depending on your budget and your store's stock. ASUS Zenbook 14 Q407IQ-BR5N4 14" Laptop Computer - Grey; AMD Ryzen 5 4500U 2.3GHz Processor; NVIDIA GeForce MX350 Graphics; 8GB RAM; 256GB Solid State Drive HP Pavilion 15-ec0003ca 15.6" Gaming Laptop Computer Factory Refurbished - Black; AMD Ryzen 7 3750H 2.3GHz Processor; NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1650 4GB GDDR5; 8GB DDR4-2400 RAM; 512GB Solid State Drive Acer Nitro 5 AN515-54-52QW 15.6" Gaming Laptop Computer - Black; Intel Core i5-9300H Processor 2.4GHz; NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2060 6GB GDDR6; 16GB DDR4-2666 RAM; 1TB Solid State Drive I hope this helps, but please let me know if you have any questions. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook kgfPatsfan ✭ February 16 Thank you. I would say the ASUS is just a little more than i wanted to spend and is beautifully lightweight Doesn't seem to have a way to cable in to my modem to diagnose or overcome connection issues. The HP Pavilion seems to have almost everything I want - maybe a little on the heavy side, but I have better computer luggage than I used to and it might not be as important as I think it is. I could stretch to afford this too. The Acer Nitro is out; I'm just not willing to spend this much money on myself. My local store (Cambridge) appears to have all of these. Although you offered choices (thank you!) you did not enlarge on why these choices match my terribly vague specs. I'd like to hear why you chose these, but I'm happy enough with choice 2 that I probably don't need reinforcement. If I go with the HP, can you recommend a mouse and keyboard? Any reason I should not go with a simple and cheap option? 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook LandShark admin February 16 I based my recommendation on the specifications you needed and the availability I could see. The HP is refurbished, however, it's a great option with a dedicated GPU. (GTX 1650) which will offer great performance for the games you're interested in. I wanted to give you options at multiple price points that would offer you good, better, best for the price you mentioned. I'd recommend a decent keyboard, but it would be mostly dependant on your budget and your needs. I spend my time working from a keyboard so I spend more than most. If I were looking for cheap yet quality, I'd buy something like the Redragon K530 Draconic 61 and the ASUS TUF 3 I'm a fan of Mechanical Brown Switches, and I like the wrist wrest on the Cooler Master CK530 and I like the shape and light weight performance from the Glorious Model D. I'd be happy to recommend others if you're unhappy with these. 1 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook kgfPatsfan ✭ February 16 Thank you! Did you have any thoughts on the Inspiron Dell wants to sell me? I am not afraid of refurbished, and the specs of this machine address several of the things I know I want - thank you! My computer needs have atrophied extremely over the past few years, as I have moved more firmly to separate work and home. My home machine only needs to be able to game, and I am absolutely not a power gamer. I have extensive access to Office products and storage at work; I do not anticipate typing more than chat comments on this machine. Also, i will be typing and mousing from the depths of my comfy chair. I have been perfectly happy with a $14.99 logitech mouse/keyboard combo that ran off the same USB for a year, but like all cheap thinks, it eventually broke. Tempted by anything named redragon - I'm Welsh. The discussion I found on brown switch online takes me back - clicky keys! pressure resistance! I used to care so much about these things! I am definitely thinking hard about these options. Both of these mice seem subtly right-handed - I am left-handed. I do mouse with right hand buttons - I started my professional life in tech support and needed to be able to use other people's mice - but I use my left hand. Thank you for your time. I will definitely go with the HP. I will think about the redragon keyboard. I will keep looking at mice. 1 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook LandShark admin February 17 Hmm, the Dell Inspiron that they have recommended for you doesn't have dedicated graphics. It does have Intel's new Xe integrated graphics which will perform better than the previous generations by a fair amount. It may still struggle to offer you decent framerates for tables with multiple assets or games that have a slightly higher graphics fidelity. That being said, it is a thin and light laptop which would be great for travel. It's an extremely portable laptop. Especially for a 15.6" inch. I prefer the brown switches for their tactile feedback! The blue switches are great too, however, they are quite a bit louder than reasonable. Especially since you mentioned you'll be using your laptop microphone. If you're planning on hosting meetings or other things, I might suggest a more quiet keyboard, like the Logitech you mentioned. Membrane keyboards are typically more quiet than mechanical. Red switches are very fast and typically a bit quieter, however, they are a bit too sensitive for my liking. (I have heavy hands that depress the key when I rest it on the keyboard.) Check out our recent article on Mechanical or Membrane. If noise is an issue for you, one can always purchase O-rings to dampen the noise that the key makes when bottoming out. Sorry, I didn't think to offer you an ambidextrous mouse. I'm a righty, so I recommend what I use/know. I don't have much experience with ambidextrous mice, however, the Logitech G G203 is great for an inexpensive yet high-quality option. Another mouse that I have experience with would be the Logitech G PRO It does have mouse buttons that can be switched for left-handed use. Always happy to help! 1 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Categories 7K All Categories 1.1K The Blog 38 What's Trending 167 How to & Technical Guides 11 Computer Hardware 119 Software 3 Home Office 6 Networking Audio/Visual 2 Home Automation 16 3D Printers 10 Maker 16 PC Build Guides 96 Reviews & Buying Guides 34 Build Showcase 17 Contests 39 Past Contests 1K The Community 1.8K General Discussion 84 New Members 127 Consumer Tech 42 Prebuilt PCs and Laptops 78 Software 4 Audio/Visual 13 Networking & Security 1 Home Automation 2 Digital Photography 3 Content Creators 22 Hobby Boards & Projects 26 3D Printing 53 Retro Arcade/Gaming 86 All Other Tech 1.4K Store Information and Policy 52 Off Topic 6 Community Ideas & Feedback 114 Your Completed Builds 2.7K Build-Your-Own PC 1.7K Help Choosing Parts 227 Graphics Cards 175 CPUs, Memory, and Motherboards 63 Cases and Power Supplies 19 Air and Liquid Cooling 17 Monitors and Displays 30 Peripherals 10 All Other Parts 23 Featured Categories We love seeing what our customers build Submit photos and a description of your PC to our build showcase Submit Now Looking for a little inspiration? See other custom PC builds and get some ideas for what can be done View Build Showcase View builds by: AMD Processors Intel Processors RTX 3090 RTX 3080 RTX 2080 Ti RTX 2080 Super RTX 2070 Super RTX 2070 RTX 2060 Super Radeon RX 5700XT Radeon RX 5700 Air Cooled Liquid Cooled SAME DAY CUSTOM BUILD SERVICE If You Can Dream it, We Can Build it. Services starting at $149.99 More Details Micro Center Homepage Desktops Laptops Computer Parts Computer Accessories Custom PC Builder Build Showcase Networking Electronics 3D Printing Service, Upgrades & Repairs Laptop Battery Replacement Laptop Screen Repair Virus and Malware Removal Hard Drive Recovery and Backup Apple MacBook Repair Custom Built PCs Schedule an Appointment © Vanilla Foundation Theme 2021 Powered By Vanilla Community Article Beginner's VR Setup Buying Guide - Oculus Quest 2 — Micro Center Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker {$smarty.capture.menu} Activity Categories Discussions Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker Home › Reviews & Buying Guides Beginner's VR Setup Buying Guide - Oculus Quest 2 cgum admin October 2020 edited October 2020 in Reviews & Buying Guides Oculus Quest 2 - An Affordable Headset for Anyone Wanting to Get into VR Following the recent launch of the Oculus Quest 2, there has never been a better time to immerse yourself in the world of VR. And yes, I say this knowing full well that consumer VR experiences are in their relative infancy. VR as a technology has been around for a long time, of course. But it was not until Oculus, now owned by Facebook, brought the Oculus Rift to Kickstarter that the modern VR movement began to take off. Now just a handful of years later, the Oculus Quest 2 propels the category forward in a big way by combining a standalone form factor with the flexibility of plugging it into a PC.   Oculus considers the Oculus Quest 2 to be its "most advanced all-in-one VR headset" to date, and that is an accurate description. It is also arguably the best VR headset for many people, especially first-time VR users, because the cost of entry is relatively reasonable at $299. That gets you the version with 64GB of onboard storage. There is also a 256GB model that costs $399. For comparison, the first-generation Oculus Quest debuted at $399 for the 64GB model and $499 for the 128GB model. Which version should you opt for? Well, apps and games typically range in size from a few hundred megabytes (like Bait!, which is just over 200MB) to around a couple of gigabytes (like Dance Central VR, which is 2.78GB). There are exceptions in either direction—Netflix and YouTube VR are each in the neighborhood of 90MB, while Arizona Sunshine is just over 4.5GB. Bear in mind there is no way to expand the built-in storage. If you anticipate installing many apps and especially some of the bigger games, the 256GB model is the wiser choice. Otherwise, the 64GB model is more affordable, with still enough room for at least a dozen apps and games, depending on their size. Oculus also unveiled a Quest 2 Elite Strap for $49. This increases balance and support for added comfort and has a nifty dial to adjust the fit a cinch. I'd recommend springing for this upgrade if you can swing it. Or for $129, Oculus sells the Quest 2 Elite Strap bundled with a built-in battery pack and carrying case if you anticipate spending several hours at a time in VR. Otherwise, it is more of a luxury add-on than a necessity. Oculus Quest 2 and Oculus Quest Specifications Compared     Oculus Quest 2 Oculus Quest Display Type   Fast-Switch LCD OLED Resolution   1832x1920 per eye 1440x1600 per eye Refresh Rate   72Hz initially (90Hz later) 72Hz Processor   Qualcomm Snapdragon XR2 Qualcomm Snapdragon 835 RAM   6GB 4GB Storage   64GB or 256GB 64GB or 128GB Tracking   Inside-Out, 6DoF Inside-Out, 6DoF Audio   Built-in + 3.5mm jack Built-in + 3.5mm jack Weight   503 grams 571 grams Dimensions   191.5 x 102 x 142.5mm 193 x 105 x 222 mm Compared to the original Oculus Quest, this second-generation model offers 50 percent more pixels. It also sports a faster processor and more RAM, it is lighter on the noggin, and eventually will have a faster refresh rate to boot. Oculus intends to push out a firmware update that will bump the resolution to 90Hz, which is the same as the HTC Vive Cosmos and HP Reverb G2. Interestingly, Facebook is making it a requirement to link the Oculus Quest 2 headset to a Facebook account. The only exception is if you already have a separate Oculus account—you can choose to merge it with your Facebook account or keep them separate until January 1, 2023. If you do not link your accounts after that date, it could potentially break some experiences. Using Oculus Quest 2 as a Standalone Headset or with a PC Since the hardware is built into the Oculus Quest 2, it does not need tethering to a PC. It falls into the standalone (or all-in-one) category. This is also true of the tracking—inside-out tracking means the built-in cameras and sensors track your position and movements, rather than having to clutter your living room or designated VR space with base stations. It is a truly wireless solution and one of the biggest appeals of the Oculus Quest 2. It's essentially a mobile VR headset. The disadvantage of an all-in-one design is that the built-in hardware pales in comparison to a high-end PC. Headsets like the Valve Index, for example, must be connected to a computer and are powered by the system's components (CPU, GPU, RAM, and storage). There are other advantages with the Index as well (higher refresh rate and better tracking), but it requires a substantially higher investment—$999 for the full kit, which includes the headset, controllers, and base stations. Plus, the cost of a PC. That said, one of the neatest things about the Oculus Quest 2 is the option to connect it to a PC as well if desired. This feature is called Oculus Link, and while it is not quite the best of both worlds, it is undoubtedly a compelling proposition that makes the Oculus Quest 2 even more intriguing. To do this, you need a high-quality USB 3.x Type-C cable (or USB Type-C to Type-A). Alternatively, Oculus sells a (pricey) fiber-optic Oculus Link cable for $79.99. If you plan to go this route, you will want to make sure your PC meets the recommended requirements. Fortunately, you don't need an uber-powerful and/or ultra-expensive setup. Just the following: ●     Intel Core i5-4590 or AMD Ryzen 5 1500X or better ●     NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1650 Super or AMD Radeon RX 400 series or better ●     8GB+ RAM ●     1x USB port ●     Windows 10 Oculus maintains a list of currently supported GPUs and ones that are not supported, like the GeForce GTX 1060 3GB, GTX 1060M, and GTX 1650 (non-Super). In short, though, any relatively modern PC should be good to go. If going the prebuilt route, you can find compatible PCs that cost less than a grand, like the Acer Predator Orion 3000 (Core i5-10400F, GeForce GTX 1650 Super, 12GB DDR4 RAM, 512GB SSD) for $949.99. Or, if building your own, you could assemble a capable PC for even less. Micro Center has a bunch of CPU and motherboard bundles that are good starting points. To give an example, here's a system I came up with on a sub-$800 budget: ●     Intel Core i5-9600F and Gigabyte B365 Ultra combo: $219.98 ●     Gigabyte GeForce RTX 1650 Super Windforce OC: $169.99 ●     16GB (2x8GB) Crucial Ballistix DDR4-3200: $69.99 ●     1TB WD Blue NVMe SSD: $104.99 ●     NZXT H510 Mid-Tower Case: $69.99 ●     EVGA 650BQ 650W 80 Plus Bronze PSU: $79.99 You can order this exact build from our Custom PC Builder. Add on Same Day Pro Assembly to be ready for gaming the moment you leave the store! The total cost is just north of $700 (plus Windows 10, if needed). This would be sufficient to play a game like Half-Life: Alyx, though if you can swing a higher-end GPU (like a GeForce GTX 1660 Ti or better), you can play more comfortably at higher settings. The bottom line is, the Oculus Quest 2 is worth looking into if you want to dive into VR without spending a fortune. It combines the convenience of an all-in-one form factor with the option of plugging it into a PC for expanded experiences. It's not perfect—Facebook's push to tie the headset to a social media account feels overbearing—but overall, this is a great place to start your VR journey. Written By: Paul Lilly 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Leave a Comment Rich Text Editor. To edit a paragraph's style, hit tab to get to the paragraph menu. From there you will be able to pick one style. Nothing defaults to paragraph. An inline formatting menu will show up when you select text. Hit tab to get into that menu. Some elements, such as rich link embeds, images, loading indicators, and error messages may get inserted into the editor. You may navigate to these using the arrow keys inside of the editor and delete them with the delete or backspace key. Comment As ... Categories 7K All Categories 1.1K The Blog 38 What's Trending 167 How to & Technical Guides 11 Computer Hardware 119 Software 3 Home Office 6 Networking Audio/Visual 2 Home Automation 16 3D Printers 10 Maker 16 PC Build Guides 96 Reviews & Buying Guides 34 Build Showcase 17 Contests 39 Past Contests 1K The Community 1.8K General Discussion 84 New Members 127 Consumer Tech 42 Prebuilt PCs and Laptops 78 Software 4 Audio/Visual 13 Networking & Security 1 Home Automation 2 Digital Photography 3 Content Creators 22 Hobby Boards & Projects 26 3D Printing 53 Retro Arcade/Gaming 86 All Other Tech 1.4K Store Information and Policy 52 Off Topic 6 Community Ideas & Feedback 114 Your Completed Builds 2.7K Build-Your-Own PC 1.7K Help Choosing Parts 227 Graphics Cards 175 CPUs, Memory, and Motherboards 63 Cases and Power Supplies 19 Air and Liquid Cooling 17 Monitors and Displays 30 Peripherals 10 All Other Parts 23 Featured Categories We love seeing what our customers build Submit photos and a description of your PC to our build showcase Submit Now Looking for a little inspiration? See other custom PC builds and get some ideas for what can be done View Build Showcase View builds by: AMD Processors Intel Processors RTX 3090 RTX 3080 RTX 2080 Ti RTX 2080 Super RTX 2070 Super RTX 2070 RTX 2060 Super Radeon RX 5700XT Radeon RX 5700 Air Cooled Liquid Cooled SAME DAY CUSTOM BUILD SERVICE If You Can Dream it, We Can Build it. Services starting at $149.99 More Details Micro Center Homepage Desktops Laptops Computer Parts Computer Accessories Custom PC Builder Build Showcase Networking Electronics 3D Printing Service, Upgrades & Repairs Laptop Battery Replacement Laptop Screen Repair Virus and Malware Removal Hard Drive Recovery and Backup Apple MacBook Repair Custom Built PCs Schedule an Appointment © Vanilla Foundation Theme 2021 Powered By Vanilla Community Article Join the MicroCenterOfficial Folding@Home Team: #257944 - Page 9 — Micro Center Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker {$smarty.capture.menu} Activity Categories Discussions Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker Home › General Discussion Join the MicroCenterOfficial [email protected] Team: #257944 «1…6789101112…26» Comments cine_chris Powder Springs, GA ✭✭✭ May 2020 kmiller922 said: Now how cool would it be to get a hold of that new Nvidia AI chip and put that to work if it was affordable. There i go dreaming again. Picture a Transformer that eats WUs. 1 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook cine_chris Powder Springs, GA ✭✭✭ May 2020 edited May 2020 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook MightyMayfield Mayfield Heights, OH ✭✭✭ May 2020 The first billion of many, hopefully! 2 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook kmiller922 Glenside, Pa ✭✭✭ May 2020 @MightyMayfield Congratz 2 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Kirito ✭✭ May 2020 Nice Job! It will only take me twenty five years to get to where you are now! Needless to say, I am glad we aren't folding origami cranes to accomplish this. Kirito 1 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook cine_chris Powder Springs, GA ✭✭✭ May 2020 @MightyMayfield Kudos to everyone supporting the team.  I saw that. I too was enjoying a more modest celebration, 100 million. Dallas hit 100 million milestone yesterday too,   We also have 3 donor teams about to reach the 1/4 Billion level.  1 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Wommwalsh Minnesota ✭ May 2020 Congratulations to all! Team rank of 92 isn’t shabby either.  My mostly antique collection is going to drop out of the top 20 soon, especially when the summer heat throttles it (quite a surprise to be here in the first place). Kirk says: “I need more power”. Scotti says: “I’m giving her all she’s got”. I say: “Maybe we need a new ship”! Maybe there will be a MC-Folders team discount sale someday… 3 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook kmiller922 Glenside, Pa ✭✭✭ May 2020 I'm just surprized that somehow I've managed to get into the top 30 for the team, working on finding other ways to keep eveything nice and cool to keep the pace going, maybe make it part of a keg-er-rater, why not  3 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook cine_chris Powder Springs, GA ✭✭✭ May 2020 edited May 2020 Wommwalsh said: Maybe there will be a MC-Folders team discount sale someday… Starting with the 1st pick of open-box GPUs would be a good starting point.  &/or a sponsored rebate program for MCfolders perhaps?  Discount points for reaching folding plateaus?  MCfollder team face masks? Free gear for making foolish forum comments or senior-retiree folders?  (going for a double) 1 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Yellowbillycat ✭ May 2020 cine_chris said: The weather is starting to heat up in the ATL area, so I'll have to start throttling back on the [email protected] effort soon. @cine_chris One of the things I don't miss about living in ATL: Summer. I'm agonizing over how to get across the 5M PPD barrier.  I've hit a GPU ceiling.  I knew I was done when I pulled a GT 1030 out of the bottom of a box and slapped it in a Core2Duo. 1 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook kmiller922 Glenside, Pa ✭✭✭ May 2020 edited May 2020 I think the only way I can cross the 3M PPD is to get another system going just not sure if I should if a miner rig would be a good way to go about it since i don't know linix at all. I don't know if this would be the best way to dive into a operating system I've never used before. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook cine_chris Powder Springs, GA ✭✭✭ May 2020 @kmiller922 From what I read on the EVGA forum you don't go less than a 4x PCIE slot and they talk about running i3s with Linux.  On Win10, I see about 30% cpu utilization on an older i5 with one RTX GPU.   This system is running two GTX 1660s with a XEON E3-1230 v3; it gets about 30% cpu utilization.  NO folding on the older CPUs it just wastes watts.  Best GPU for me has been the MSI Ventus 2060 super. I'm buying another one tomorrow and returning two open-box 1660s.  I'm going to try and run two of these in an open-chassis over the summer.  That box should sustain ~3milPPD, likely more.  The EVGA guys talk about power capping their GPUs to control temp & power draw.  I use MSI Afterburner to do that and set a fan profile that minimizes thermal fluctuations during checkpoints and WU cycling HTH 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook cine_chris Powder Springs, GA ✭✭✭ May 2020 Yellowbillycat said: @cine_chris One of the things I don't miss about living in ATL: Summer. I'm agonizing over how to get across the 5M PPD barrier.  I've hit a GPU ceiling.  I knew I was done when I pulled a GT 1030 out of the bottom of a box and slapped it in a Core2Duo. @Yellowbillycat LOL & LOL   I had two 1050Ti w/i7 cpu running until very recently chasing you guys.  I still have some Core2 Duo too... found a local group that'll take donations and currently collecting all that into boxes, A4,A6 AMDs too.  I'd try to add a RTX 2060 super in an open-chassis.  I've gutted two old tower systems down to their bare chassis.  I'll get some pictures to post.  I'm planning to tread water until we see what AMD & Nvidia will unveil in the fall. PCIe4, lower pwr consumption & anticipated huge performance jump in GPU tech, I'm trying to curb my enthusiasm      0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook kmiller922 Glenside, Pa ✭✭✭ May 2020 Then I might be better off trying to vertical mount my 980 ti and get another 2080ti then if I'm understanding that correctly @cine_chris. I've managed to keep my gpu nice and cool no higher than 66c and running a I-9 9900 processor to my surprise has been not to far behind on the wu's. Since getting the aoi cooler for the cpu it has been running smooth as glass. Might try to go that route power use has been running at a steady 95% efficiency.  0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Yellowbillycat ✭ May 2020 cine_chris said: @kmiller922 From what I read on the EVGA forum you don't go less than a 4x PCIE slot and they talk about running i3s with Linux. Interesting.  I have a 1x PCIe riser on the way ($6) to get an idle P106-90 running.  I'll have to compare it to the other P106 that's in an 8x slot right now.  4x risers are cheap, but out of China, so sloooow delivery. Currently running: R7 1700 + RTX 2070 Ubuntu 18.04 i5-6600K + GTX 1070 + P106-90 Ubuntu 18.04 i5-2400 + GTX 1650 (when it itsn't running Zwift) Windows 10 Core2Duo + GT 1030 Ubuntu 20.04 P71 Laptop i7-7700HQ + Quadro M620 Windows 10 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook kmiller922 Glenside, Pa ✭✭✭ May 2020 edited May 2020 The other system I have up and running is my sons gamming laptop mobil 1080ti nvida and I9 8950hk processor. Both systems running windows 10 pro  So yeah I guess I should get more systems up and running as well when I can aquire them lol. But one other thing I noticed is that gpu usage is only about 30-40% avg sometimes 50% is there a way to get it to use all of it or at least more? 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook cine_chris Powder Springs, GA ✭✭✭ May 2020 @kmiller922 A 2080Ti, at 300 watts power draw is a lot of heat & requires a big pwr supply.  The latest Folding spreadsheet says 2.7M PPD for the 2080Ti!  I suspect I could get ~3M PPD on avg from two 2060 Super for near the same power & <2/3 $$$, but I have several boxes to hold stuff.  Right now the 2060 is running 1.34M PPD & the 2070 is at 1.87M PPD.  The 2060 is usually higher, around 1.5 , but WUs vary.  11748 project is the one that's pulling down the 2060.  I complained about another project & got a response from the proj mgr.      0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook ChrisHarshman ✭✭ May 2020 edited May 2020 Yellowbillycat said: Currently running: R7 1700 + RTX 2070 Ubuntu 18.04 i5-6600K + GTX 1070 + P106-90 Ubuntu 18.04 i5-2400 + GTX 1650 (when it itsn't running Zwift) Windows 10 Core2Duo + GT 1030 Ubuntu 20.04 P71 Laptop i7-7700HQ + Quadro M620 Windows 10 funny... glad to see I'm not the only one running some old garbage CPU just to hold another graphics card to get a few more points.  Did you try 20.04 just for the challenge?  I've read there are a lot of broken dependencies with the drop of Python2 support.  Setup I have currently: Ryzen 5 1600 + GTX 1660 TI  (open box deal!)  dual boot Windows 10 and LUbuntu 18.04 Ryzen 5 1600 + GTX 1660 super  running LUbuntu 18.04 FX-8320 + GTX1650 super  (only folding on GPU)  running LUbuntu 18.04 Core 2 Duo + GTX 1060  (only folding on GPU)  running Debian Buster ...and I've been trying to talk myself out of getting another graphics card for my Celeron J3450 processor machine ;-) Also @MightyMayfield, congrats on the billion mark! 2 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook cine_chris Powder Springs, GA ✭✭✭ May 2020 @Yellowbillycat , I'm a Zwifter too. Going to add a GTX 1050Ti to that box to run the video, which I can just pause for Zwift. That box will be close to 1M PPd with everything running smoothly & none of the WU that have been choking the 1660s. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook kmiller922 Glenside, Pa ✭✭✭ May 2020 edited May 2020 My mistake I think was not keeping another copy of a os for another system, I just kept doing upgrades when it was time and didn't think I was going to need another system so that's why I only have my one tower and laptop here. That and I would need a crash course on linux for dummies as well if i go that route on a system solely for folding. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook cine_chris Powder Springs, GA ✭✭✭ May 2020 cine_chris said: @Yellowbillycat , I'm a Zwifter too. Going to add a GTX 1050Ti to that box to run the video, which I can just pause for Zwift. That box will be close to 1M PPd with everything running smoothly & none of the WU that have been choking the 1660s. About as anticipated, that system is runnng in the 900k PPD area.  I'm thinking about trying to sustain 3-4M PPD over the summer months with two systems.  Adding the GTX 1050Ti paused running video, allowed me to run Zwift w/o crashes with the CPU & !660 super at full.  Sometimes I get lucky and my ideas actually work.  0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Kirito ✭✭ May 2020 kmiller922 said: My mistake I think was not keeping another copy of a os for another system, I just kept doing upgrades when it was time and didn't think I was going to need another system so that's why I only have my one tower and laptop here. That and I would need a crash course on linux for dummies as well if i go that route on a system solely for folding. Linux is easy.  I am using Fedora on three of my four folding machines.  I like it because of the support I get and the way I can make it look like Windows when I build machines for other people who are unfamiliar with Linux.  My daughter ran a machine for four months before she knew I had switched her off of Windows.  Go to www.distrowatch.com and find a flavor of Linux you like.  Ubuntu looks like Mac.  Mint is easiest and can look either way.  (You can make any Linux distro look like anything).  And best of all it's all free.  I chose Fedora and then googled "28 things after Fedora install" which gives you a command line walk through on what you need to do next.  Then google FAH for Linux and follow the instructions. Just don't start with Arch as a distro unless you really do want to play at the deeper end of the pool.  If all you have known is Windows then use something easier with more built in GUI's.  That said, once you get into the habit of doing your routine maintenance from the command line you might find it faster and easier.  JMHO. Kirito 2 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook kmiller922 Glenside, Pa ✭✭✭ May 2020 Well we may be down to 48.6% of the total users we had but we are still turning and burning   GO TEAM 2 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook ryau ✭✭✭✭✭ May 2020 BTW a new Windows client is available: 7.6.13 https://foldingathome.org/start-folding/ 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Wommwalsh Minnesota ✭ May 2020 ryau said: BTW a new Windows client is available: 7.6.13 https://foldingathome.org/start-folding/ I thought I saw a bunch of bug reports on that version – but I can’t seem to find them now. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook ryau ✭✭✭✭✭ May 2020 Wommwalsh said: ryau said: BTW a new Windows client is available: 7.6.13 https://foldingathome.org/start-folding/ I thought I saw a bunch of bug reports on that version – but I can’t seem to find them now. I ran it overnight with no issues, but I'm running it on a single machine, no complex set up here. 1 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook ChrisHarshman ✭✭ May 2020 Yes Linux can be easy.  One of the reason I have 3 machines folding on LUbuntu 18.04 is because how quick it is to setup a new machine, plus it operates more efficiently.  A number of people online report that you will earn more points folding on Linux. I've been running the 7.6.13 client on Linux for a couple of weeks now, it's been fine there. 1 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook ryau ✭✭✭✭✭ May 2020 Interesting, not sure I want to switch to Linux, but I did manage to fine tune my config to get about a 20-25% increase in PPD. I have a 3950X (16C/32T) and found running multiple CPU slots with 4 threads each seems optimal. I've also applied a mild CPU OC, but am leery of pushing it too much as temps climb pretty high for not much performance gain. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook MissingNOLA ✭ May 2020 Question for those who know better than I: I've gotten an old Core2Duo system resurrected with a Linux OS.  The graphics card is too ancient to fold and this CPU doesn't eek out enough points to justify its power drain.  Anyone know of a cheap PCIe GPU that would work in this clunker to make it worthwhile?  Don't want to spend much since folding is the only use this box will ever get. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook MissingNOLA ✭ May 2020 kmiller922 said: My mistake I think was not keeping another copy of a os for another system, I just kept doing upgrades when it was time and didn't think I was going to need another system so that's why I only have my one tower and laptop here. That and I would need a crash course on linux for dummies as well if i go that route on a system solely for folding. I was in the same boat, but was able to find enough info online to get an old PC running without too much trouble, and I'm no techie.  You'll need a blank thumb drive (8gb should be plenty).  Pick your Linux flavor (I'm using Mint; best? Maybe not, but I don't really care right now) from a distro (previous reply to you had good direction there).  Download the Linux file and find the Rufus app (also free - this let's you make a bootable thumb drive).  Once you've saved the Linux download to your current PC, put in the thumb drive and run Rufus; it will ask you to point it to that Linux file, which it will use to make the Linux thumb drive.  You can then boot another machine from that thumb drive and the OS will run from it.  You can install on a HDD from there, if you like.   There are plenty of online videos demonstrating how to do this, just find one that speaks to your level. 1 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook «1…6789101112…26» Categories 7K All Categories 1.1K The Blog 38 What's Trending 167 How to & Technical Guides 11 Computer Hardware 119 Software 3 Home Office 6 Networking Audio/Visual 2 Home Automation 16 3D Printers 10 Maker 16 PC Build Guides 96 Reviews & Buying Guides 34 Build Showcase 17 Contests 39 Past Contests 1K The Community 1.8K General Discussion 84 New Members 127 Consumer Tech 42 Prebuilt PCs and Laptops 78 Software 4 Audio/Visual 13 Networking & Security 1 Home Automation 2 Digital Photography 3 Content Creators 22 Hobby Boards & Projects 26 3D Printing 53 Retro Arcade/Gaming 86 All Other Tech 1.4K Store Information and Policy 52 Off Topic 6 Community Ideas & Feedback 114 Your Completed Builds 2.7K Build-Your-Own PC 1.7K Help Choosing Parts 227 Graphics Cards 175 CPUs, Memory, and Motherboards 63 Cases and Power Supplies 19 Air and Liquid Cooling 17 Monitors and Displays 30 Peripherals 10 All Other Parts 23 Featured Categories We love seeing what our customers build Submit photos and a description of your PC to our build showcase Submit Now Looking for a little inspiration? See other custom PC builds and get some ideas for what can be done View Build Showcase View builds by: AMD Processors Intel Processors RTX 3090 RTX 3080 RTX 2080 Ti RTX 2080 Super RTX 2070 Super RTX 2070 RTX 2060 Super Radeon RX 5700XT Radeon RX 5700 Air Cooled Liquid Cooled SAME DAY CUSTOM BUILD SERVICE If You Can Dream it, We Can Build it. Services starting at $149.99 More Details Micro Center Homepage Desktops Laptops Computer Parts Computer Accessories Custom PC Builder Build Showcase Networking Electronics 3D Printing Service, Upgrades & Repairs Laptop Battery Replacement Laptop Screen Repair Virus and Malware Removal Hard Drive Recovery and Backup Apple MacBook Repair Custom Built PCs Schedule an Appointment © Vanilla Foundation Theme 2021 Powered By Vanilla Community Article Multiple Monitor build — Micro Center Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker {$smarty.capture.menu} Activity Categories Discussions Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker Home › Help Choosing Parts Multiple Monitor build hammond2003 ✭ January 2020 in Help Choosing Parts I'm interested in building a machine that is capable of running 6-8 monitors, preferably at 4k, 60hz resolution. Anybody know if I need multiple video cards to do so, and if so, is there a way to get it done for less than ~$1,500 total for both cards? 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Comments TSMichaelB admin January 2020 Welcome to the forum Hammond. Luckily the only real requirements are going to be ports for HDMI 2.0 or DisplayPort 1.2 or higher. Luckily most modern graphics cards meet this requirement, so we have many options available to us. There are cards such as the NVS 810 that support 8 displays natively: https://www.microcenter.com/product/469172/pny-nvs-810-single-fan-4gb-ddr3-pcie-30-video-card, however their implementation is a little tricky. They are technically 2 graphics cards on a single PCB. This card by itself can support 4 displays running at 4k 60hz, or 8 displays running at 4k 30hz. Since you need all 8 to be running at 60hz, you would have to go with 2 of these cards to achieve that goal. With that in mind, I think there are more economical options available to meet your requirements. This GTX 1660 supports 4 displays, each of which can have a resolution up to 7680x4320 @ 120Hz: https://www.microcenter.com/product/604243/msi-geforce-gtx-1660-ventus-xs-overclocked-dual-fan-6gb-gddr5-pcie-30-video-card. This is thanks to the cards multiple DisplayPort 1.4 ports and HDMI 2.0B port. You will have plenty of bandwidth to drive 4 x 4k60hz monitors on a single card. Simply add a second card and you can drive another 4 displays. This setup would be around $400-$450, which is still cheaper than the NVS 810 option, but it takes up more space and may use a little extra power. If you need the extra horsepower, you can definitely invest in faster cards given your budget overhead. If you don't plan on gaming or video editing on these displays and are simply using the cards to output a video signal, then the GTX 1660 with the 3x DP 1xHDMI configuration is likely your most economical option. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Categories 7K All Categories 1.1K The Blog 37 What's Trending 167 How to & Technical Guides 11 Computer Hardware 119 Software 3 Home Office 6 Networking Audio/Visual 2 Home Automation 16 3D Printers 10 Maker 16 PC Build Guides 96 Reviews & Buying Guides 34 Build Showcase 17 Contests 39 Past Contests 1K The Community 1.8K General Discussion 84 New Members 127 Consumer Tech 42 Prebuilt PCs and Laptops 78 Software 4 Audio/Visual 13 Networking & Security 1 Home Automation 2 Digital Photography 3 Content Creators 22 Hobby Boards & Projects 26 3D Printing 53 Retro Arcade/Gaming 86 All Other Tech 1.4K Store Information and Policy 52 Off Topic 6 Community Ideas & Feedback 114 Your Completed Builds 2.7K Build-Your-Own PC 1.7K Help Choosing Parts 227 Graphics Cards 175 CPUs, Memory, and Motherboards 63 Cases and Power Supplies 19 Air and Liquid Cooling 17 Monitors and Displays 30 Peripherals 10 All Other Parts 23 Featured Categories We love seeing what our customers build Submit photos and a description of your PC to our build showcase Submit Now Looking for a little inspiration? See other custom PC builds and get some ideas for what can be done View Build Showcase View builds by: AMD Processors Intel Processors RTX 3090 RTX 3080 RTX 2080 Ti RTX 2080 Super RTX 2070 Super RTX 2070 RTX 2060 Super Radeon RX 5700XT Radeon RX 5700 Air Cooled Liquid Cooled SAME DAY CUSTOM BUILD SERVICE If You Can Dream it, We Can Build it. Services starting at $149.99 More Details Micro Center Homepage Desktops Laptops Computer Parts Computer Accessories Custom PC Builder Build Showcase Networking Electronics 3D Printing Service, Upgrades & Repairs Laptop Battery Replacement Laptop Screen Repair Virus and Malware Removal Hard Drive Recovery and Backup Apple MacBook Repair Custom Built PCs Schedule an Appointment © Vanilla Foundation Theme 2021 Powered By Vanilla Community Article B830 upgrade — Micro Center Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker {$smarty.capture.menu} Activity Categories Discussions Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker Home › General Discussion B830 upgrade jfeuer ✭ July 2020 edited January 15 in General Discussion I have a B830 and am interesting in upgrading the graphics card and the memory.  Is this possible on this particular model?  0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Comments TSMichaelB admin July 2020 Welcome to the forum, @jfeuer. The B830 can definitely be upgraded with a new graphics card and some memory, but there are a couple things to keep in mind. First, the included power supply is only 300W and does not include any additional power cables. This will limit your options considerably, but with modern hardware you can still see a very strong performance boost. If you do not intend to upgrade the PSU, I'd strongly recommend a GTX 1650: https://www.microcenter.com/product/606545/msi-geforce-gtx-1650-ventus-xs-overclocked-dual-fan-4gb-gddr5-pcie-30-graphics-card. These are going to be the fastest graphics cards you can use without a 6 pin PCIe power cable and are priced quite well for their performance. Secondly, memory is going to be limited to a max configuration of 4x8GB and up to DDR3 1600mhz speed. Here is a list of DDR3 1600mhz memory we carry: https://www.microcenter.com/search/search_results.aspx?Ntk=all&sortby=match&N=4294966965+4294821353+4294820831&myStore=false. Lastly, make sure you install new drivers when you upgrade your graphics card. With such a large jump in graphics generations, your current drivers may not support the newer GPU's. If you have any further questions, let us know! 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook jfeuer ✭ July 2020 And if I upgrade the PSU, what card could I upgrade to?  And what power supply would you recommend that MicroCenter carries? 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook TSMikeW admin July 2020 @TSMichaelB Made a good recommendation with the GTX 1650. It's a solid upgrade for you, and it's not limited very much by the CPU in your system. Above that, you're going to run into a more serious CPU bottleneck and you're not going to get as much performance for your dollar out of it. As for the power supply, 400W+. Availability is pretty limited right now. If you want to do more upgrades down the road and plan to keep the power supply I would go with 650W unit. Our Powerspec brand PSU's work just fine. EVGA and Corsair are always solid choices. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Categories 7K All Categories 1.1K The Blog 37 What's Trending 167 How to & Technical Guides 11 Computer Hardware 119 Software 3 Home Office 6 Networking Audio/Visual 2 Home Automation 16 3D Printers 10 Maker 16 PC Build Guides 96 Reviews & Buying Guides 34 Build Showcase 17 Contests 39 Past Contests 1K The Community 1.8K General Discussion 84 New Members 127 Consumer Tech 42 Prebuilt PCs and Laptops 78 Software 4 Audio/Visual 13 Networking & Security 1 Home Automation 2 Digital Photography 3 Content Creators 22 Hobby Boards & Projects 26 3D Printing 53 Retro Arcade/Gaming 86 All Other Tech 1.4K Store Information and Policy 52 Off Topic 6 Community Ideas & Feedback 114 Your Completed Builds 2.7K Build-Your-Own PC 1.7K Help Choosing Parts 227 Graphics Cards 175 CPUs, Memory, and Motherboards 63 Cases and Power Supplies 19 Air and Liquid Cooling 17 Monitors and Displays 30 Peripherals 10 All Other Parts 23 Featured Categories We love seeing what our customers build Submit photos and a description of your PC to our build showcase Submit Now Looking for a little inspiration? See other custom PC builds and get some ideas for what can be done View Build Showcase View builds by: AMD Processors Intel Processors RTX 3090 RTX 3080 RTX 2080 Ti RTX 2080 Super RTX 2070 Super RTX 2070 RTX 2060 Super Radeon RX 5700XT Radeon RX 5700 Air Cooled Liquid Cooled SAME DAY CUSTOM BUILD SERVICE If You Can Dream it, We Can Build it. Services starting at $149.99 More Details Micro Center Homepage Desktops Laptops Computer Parts Computer Accessories Custom PC Builder Build Showcase Networking Electronics 3D Printing Service, Upgrades & Repairs Laptop Battery Replacement Laptop Screen Repair Virus and Malware Removal Hard Drive Recovery and Backup Apple MacBook Repair Custom Built PCs Schedule an Appointment © Vanilla Foundation Theme 2021 Powered By Vanilla Community Article Gaming Laptop to match specs — Micro Center Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker {$smarty.capture.menu} Activity Categories Discussions Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker Home › General Discussion Gaming Laptop to match specs Rickplaysbass ✭ March 10 edited June 2 in General Discussion Hi there, I'm having a hell of a time finding a GPU anywhere to run a new simulator. I'm hoping I can find a decent price on a laptop capable of running these minimum specs at the recommended or high end level. Thanks! Minimum: 4 Cores Some Examples (but not limited to): AMD FX-6300, Intel Core i5-4430, Intel Core i5-2320, AMD Ryzen 3 1200 Recommended: 6 Cores Some Examples (but not limited to): Intel Core i7-8700K @3.70 GHz, AMD Ryzen 7 3700X or AMD Ryzen 5 3600 or better High End: 8+ Cores Some Examples (but not limited to): Intel Core 9-10980XE @ 3.0GHz, Intel i9-9900KS @ 4.00 GHz, AMD Ryzen 9 3900X or AMD Ryzen 3950X Memory (RAM) Minimum: 16GB Recommended: 16GB High End: 32+GB Graphics (GPU) A gaming graphics card with dedicated memory (vRAM) is required. Minimum: 2GB Dedicated vRAM Some Examples (but not limited to): Nvidia GeForce GTX 660 @ 2 GB / GTX 1050 or ATI Radeon HD 7850 @ 2GB / AMD RX 550 or better Recommended: 6GB Dedicated vRAM Some Examples (but not limited to): GeForce GTX 1060 with 6GB or AMD RX 580 or better High End: 8+GB Dedicated vRAM Some Examples (but not limited to): Nvidia 2080 TI or AMD Radeon VII or better 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Comments TSTDavey admin March 10 Hello @Rickplaysbass and thanks for posting on the Microcenter Community Forum. Per your specs, we'd advise to stick with the simulation recommended or high-end requirements. So for a 6 core processor and 16 gigs of ram on a laptop will cost more than the slightly higher than average laptop pc. You can find the following laptop computers on Microcenter.com, just type in the SKU number and search: Lenovo Legion Y740 refurbished gaming laptop sku# 111682 Lenovo Legion 5 sku# 105304 Msi Gf65 thin 10ue-97 gaming laptop sku# 237701 Dell XPS 15 9500 Sku# 137844 Take a look at those and let us know what you think. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Categories 7K All Categories 1.1K The Blog 37 What's Trending 167 How to & Technical Guides 11 Computer Hardware 119 Software 3 Home Office 6 Networking Audio/Visual 2 Home Automation 16 3D Printers 10 Maker 16 PC Build Guides 96 Reviews & Buying Guides 34 Build Showcase 17 Contests 39 Past Contests 1K The Community 1.8K General Discussion 84 New Members 127 Consumer Tech 42 Prebuilt PCs and Laptops 78 Software 4 Audio/Visual 13 Networking & Security 1 Home Automation 2 Digital Photography 3 Content Creators 22 Hobby Boards & Projects 26 3D Printing 53 Retro Arcade/Gaming 86 All Other Tech 1.4K Store Information and Policy 52 Off Topic 6 Community Ideas & Feedback 114 Your Completed Builds 2.7K Build-Your-Own PC 1.7K Help Choosing Parts 227 Graphics Cards 175 CPUs, Memory, and Motherboards 63 Cases and Power Supplies 19 Air and Liquid Cooling 17 Monitors and Displays 30 Peripherals 10 All Other Parts 23 Featured Categories We love seeing what our customers build Submit photos and a description of your PC to our build showcase Submit Now Looking for a little inspiration? See other custom PC builds and get some ideas for what can be done View Build Showcase View builds by: AMD Processors Intel Processors RTX 3090 RTX 3080 RTX 2080 Ti RTX 2080 Super RTX 2070 Super RTX 2070 RTX 2060 Super Radeon RX 5700XT Radeon RX 5700 Air Cooled Liquid Cooled SAME DAY CUSTOM BUILD SERVICE If You Can Dream it, We Can Build it. Services starting at $149.99 More Details Micro Center Homepage Desktops Laptops Computer Parts Computer Accessories Custom PC Builder Build Showcase Networking Electronics 3D Printing Service, Upgrades & Repairs Laptop Battery Replacement Laptop Screen Repair Virus and Malware Removal Hard Drive Recovery and Backup Apple MacBook Repair Custom Built PCs Schedule an Appointment © Vanilla Foundation Theme 2021 Powered By Vanilla Community Article Need help choosing parts on a $1000 budget — Micro Center Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker {$smarty.capture.menu} Activity Categories Discussions Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker Home › Help Choosing Parts Need help choosing parts on a $1000 budget Sphericus91 ✭ April 2020 in Help Choosing Parts I have played on console for years and want to change that in the very near future but I am having trouble choosing parts, I have seen the CPU (AMD Ryzen 3600) and the GPU (msi geforce gtx 1080 ti) but I also need to choose every other part including monitor, mouse and keyboard. Also wireless network adaptor or something of the sorts if you have suggestions please let me know. (If you can do something with the CPU and GPU or just change it if you want, its a gaming pc btw, also would like 1440p if possible)  P.S already have a headset 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Comments AlexS admin April 2020 Greetings @Sphericus91.  Welcome to the community!  Just off the bat, if you're looking to aim to game at 1440p, a monitor itself is going to chunk you about 20-25% of that budget (perhaps an investment that can be made at a later time?).  While the AMD R5 3600 has been a fairly popular CPU, you could adjust by opting for a 2600X so you can divert some money towards a decent card that'll put you in a position for quality 1440p gaming in the future. I'm not sure if you've seen our Custom PC Builder but it's quite helpful in visually seeing the cost of the build vs the budget! https://community.microcenter.com/discussion/2476/1000-pc-budget#latest This post includes a build that just touches the $1k mark but it's set for some solid 1440p gaming but does put you in the position to wait on getting a monitor, keyboard, and mouse that you may desire. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook AlexS admin April 2020 edited April 2020 Additionally, if you're open to the idea of getting a pre-built, if you see this model available at your local Micro Center, I would consider it a viable option as it includes an i5-9400F processor, GTX 1660 TI, and a 500GB SSD and it's only $799.99 currently.  That frees up ~$200 of your budget to invest towards the monitor. Powerspec G227 Here's a video that compares 1080p/1440p with multiple titles with the i5-9400F + GTX 1660Ti setup https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EnDpikjANIA 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Categories 7K All Categories 1.1K The Blog 38 What's Trending 167 How to & Technical Guides 11 Computer Hardware 119 Software 3 Home Office 6 Networking Audio/Visual 2 Home Automation 16 3D Printers 10 Maker 16 PC Build Guides 96 Reviews & Buying Guides 34 Build Showcase 17 Contests 39 Past Contests 1K The Community 1.8K General Discussion 84 New Members 127 Consumer Tech 42 Prebuilt PCs and Laptops 78 Software 4 Audio/Visual 13 Networking & Security 1 Home Automation 2 Digital Photography 3 Content Creators 22 Hobby Boards & Projects 26 3D Printing 53 Retro Arcade/Gaming 86 All Other Tech 1.4K Store Information and Policy 52 Off Topic 6 Community Ideas & Feedback 114 Your Completed Builds 2.7K Build-Your-Own PC 1.7K Help Choosing Parts 227 Graphics Cards 175 CPUs, Memory, and Motherboards 63 Cases and Power Supplies 19 Air and Liquid Cooling 17 Monitors and Displays 30 Peripherals 10 All Other Parts 23 Featured Categories We love seeing what our customers build Submit photos and a description of your PC to our build showcase Submit Now Looking for a little inspiration? See other custom PC builds and get some ideas for what can be done View Build Showcase View builds by: AMD Processors Intel Processors RTX 3090 RTX 3080 RTX 2080 Ti RTX 2080 Super RTX 2070 Super RTX 2070 RTX 2060 Super Radeon RX 5700XT Radeon RX 5700 Air Cooled Liquid Cooled SAME DAY CUSTOM BUILD SERVICE If You Can Dream it, We Can Build it. Services starting at $149.99 More Details Micro Center Homepage Desktops Laptops Computer Parts Computer Accessories Custom PC Builder Build Showcase Networking Electronics 3D Printing Service, Upgrades & Repairs Laptop Battery Replacement Laptop Screen Repair Virus and Malware Removal Hard Drive Recovery and Backup Apple MacBook Repair Custom Built PCs Schedule an Appointment © Vanilla Foundation Theme 2021 Powered By Vanilla Community Article GPU for Star Wars Squadrons PC upgrades — Micro Center Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker {$smarty.capture.menu} Activity Categories Discussions Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker Home › Help Choosing Parts GPU for Star Wars Squadrons PC upgrades Crom ✭ July 2020 in Help Choosing Parts Hello all! after the trailer drop for squadrons I decided it was finally time to gear up for VR. And I’ve been scouring the web and cooked up a few part lists. I’ll post what I came up with on my own, as well as a “Rev 2” build list based on input. One aspect I’m totally, utterly lost on is GPU, and the back and forth between what’s specified on the games website and what users are saying about their GPU’s with VR. for reference, the games system requirements. Shooting for “Recommended” category in VR. https://www.ea.com/games/starwars/squadrons/overview/pc-system-requirements Current Box: Cyber Power Gamer Ultra from 2016. thermaltake case (I like the case, super ventilated and will be re-using for this build). Am3+ socket Mobo by gigabyte (mATX size). Since new processors have a different socket, I realized pretty much immediately I’d need a new Mobo and thus this project began. So this is Not getting re-used). AMD FX-4300 quad core GeForce GTX 950 ATNG 600w PSU - mentioning this because I’ve heard some less than stellar things about these. All forum chatter mind you. So looking to replace for system safety. I’m trying to hit a budget of $600+ PSU (but still don’t want to spend a ton here, 125ish? If possible). build 1 ROG Strix B-450 F AMD Ryzen 7 2700x AMD RX 570 16GB Corsair RAM based on input from people, I’ve also got  build 2: Auros Pro B550M Ryzen 5 3600 EVGA GeForce GTX 1660 Super T-Force Vulcan 16GB ram Replacement PSU for both builds Fractal Design ION+ 560w Platinum Build 2 seems to accomplish more for less, but I’m really stuck on what GPU to go for to see High settings at launch and for VR butter smooth even if it’s on low. Thanks for any thoughts input suggestions and advice, and for also taking the time to read all this. cheers (I’m stoked for this game in case you couldn’t tell, and I haven’t dabbled in PC upgrades in over a decade, so I’m trying to learn as I go). 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Best Answer TSMichaelB admin July 2020 Accepted Answer BubbleMax said: Build 2 sounds lovely just maybe go up to a 650 psu just to be safe cause the super series of GTX's sometimes can be power hungry. With PSU's its often best to treat them like what is suggested for Ram go a bit over and not under. A little bit of head room is always nice ya never know if some bad driver update suddenly makes a card draw more power or not. Can always if you can save up money also go up to a 2060 GTX. >.>. The super series is mostly a marketing term to reference a slight difference in core counts/VRAM/clock speed on these cards. The 1660 Super doesn't pull much more power than the original 1660: https://www.anandtech.com/show/15010/the-nvidia-geforce-gtx-1660-super-review-feat-evga/15.  Keep in mind this is total system power consumption, not power consumption from the card itself. A 560W PSU is plenty of power for this card, you could even run it on a 400W PSU with no issues assuming you paired it with a lower end CPU (sub 100W).  When you factor in power consumption of graphics cards, there are a few things to keep in mind. A 6 pin connector on a GPU is normally wired to handle 75W. An 8 pin is wired to handle 150W (ignoring wire gauge). If you have a GPU with a single 6 pin connector, it can only pull 150W at most if it adheres to the ATX/PCI-SIG specifications, as the PCIe slot itself will provide up to 75W of power. With that in mind, you can safely assume your 6 pin GPU will not pull more than 150W under worse case scenarios. If you have a card with two 8 pin connections, then 375W is the max the card could potentially pull, though you'd be hard pressed to reach that power consumption without shunt mods or VBIOS power limit modifications. TL:DR: Unless he is pairing this GPU with an Intel X299 processor or AMD Threadripper, he should be fine. Crom said: Hello all! after the trailer drop for squadrons I decided it was finally time to gear up for VR. And I’ve been scouring the web and cooked up a few part lists. I’ll post what I came up with on my own, as well as a “Rev 2” build list based on input. One aspect I’m totally, utterly lost on is GPU, and the back and forth between what’s specified on the games website and what users are saying about their GPU’s with VR. for reference, the games system requirements. Shooting for “Recommended” category in VR. https://www.ea.com/games/starwars/squadrons/overview/pc-system-requirements Current Box: Cyber Power Gamer Ultra from 2016. thermaltake case (I like the case, super ventilated and will be re-using for this build). Am3+ socket Mobo by gigabyte (mATX size). Since new processors have a different socket, I realized pretty much immediately I’d need a new Mobo and thus this project began. So this is Not getting re-used). AMD FX-4300 quad core GeForce GTX 950 ATNG 600w PSU - mentioning this because I’ve heard some less than stellar things about these. All forum chatter mind you. So looking to replace for system safety. I’m trying to hit a budget of $600+ PSU (but still don’t want to spend a ton here, 125ish? If possible). build 1 ROG Strix B-450 F AMD Ryzen 7 2700x AMD RX 570 16GB Corsair RAM based on input from people, I’ve also got  build 2: Auros Pro B550M Ryzen 5 3600 EVGA GeForce GTX 1660 Super T-Force Vulcan 16GB ram Replacement PSU for both builds Fractal Design ION+ 560w Platinum Build 2 seems to accomplish more for less, but I’m really stuck on what GPU to go for to see High settings at launch and for VR butter smooth even if it’s on low. Thanks for any thoughts input suggestions and advice, and for also taking the time to read all this. cheers (I’m stoked for this game in case you couldn’t tell, and I haven’t dabbled in PC upgrades in over a decade, so I’m trying to learn as I go). I would personally go with build 2. You get slightly more cores with build 1, but build 2 offers a huge architectural improvement with the Ryzen 3000 series, and you'll absolutely feel the benefits when gaming. I'd go as far to say that even in multi-threaded workloads, the Ryzen 5 3600 would trade blows with the 2700X thanks to the improvement in IPC (Instructions Per Clock) and the improved memory controller. One recommendation would be to pair it with 3600mhz memory if you can, as you'll see a hefty performance boost as it will allow your infinity fabric to run at a 1:1 ratio with an FCLK of 1800. Get yourself a cheap 1080p 144hz G-Sync compatible monitor, and you have yourself a solid gaming experience on a great budget. 5 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Answers BubbleMax MN ✭ July 2020 Build 2 sounds lovely just maybe go up to a 650 psu just to be safe cause the super series of GTX's sometimes can be power hungry. With PSU's its often best to treat them like what is suggested for Ram go a bit over and not under. A little bit of head room is always nice ya never know if some bad driver update suddenly makes a card draw more power or not. Can always if you can save up money also go up to a 2060 GTX. >.>. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Crom ✭ July 2020 So I also started looking into the used GPU market. Found some 1070’ti’s used for about the price of the 1660 Super (little less depending on brand). Opinions? my gut instinct is to be leery of used because who knows what kind of abuses the card may have seen. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook TSMichaelB admin July 2020 Crom said: So I also started looking into the used GPU market. Found some 1070’ti’s used for about the price of the 1660 Super (little less depending on brand). Opinions? my gut instinct is to be leery of used because who knows what kind of abuses the card may have seen. A 1070 Ti would definitely be faster, but there are some things to consider. First and foremost, understand that the used GPU marketplace is far riskier now with the recent trend with crypto currency mining, so you'll definitely be rolling the dice in that regard. There are things you can do to minimize your risk, like ask for a copy of the original invoice to prove date of purchase, as some companies like EVGA allow the original manufacturer warranty to be transferred to a second party. If it has any warranty remaining, you at least have that extra peace of mind. If possible, have them send a video of the GPU installed in a system and running a benchmark like 3DMark, Superposition, etc along with a paper displaying their name and date. It's not enough that a card is booting to a desktop, as the 2D clock rate can function fine, but crash when under 3D load. It's also helpful to know that the proof of operation you received is coming from the person you are actually dealing with, not from some random google search online. Lastly, if you are meeting at their place, see if they are comfortable letting you test the card prior to purchasing. For the most part, GPU's are pretty durable, and as long as they hold their clock speed and don't crash after a few minutes of gaming, you stand a pretty good chance at having a stable card.  You can also check on various manufacturers website, as they sell factory refurbished "B-Stock" cards at a discount all the time. I scored a B-Stock 980 Ti for $120 and it is still alive and kicking after 3 years now. Do keep in mind that older architecture cards may have less features than newer cards, even if they are technically faster. It's important to factor in different feature support as well as driver longevity when you make long-term component purchases. Hopefully this helps with your decision making process. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook AlexS admin October 2020 Necropost but @Crom, have you had a chance to play Squadrons and experience it's VR yet?   0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Crom ✭ October 2020 AlexS said: Necropost but @Crom, have you had a chance to play Squadrons and experience it's VR yet?   Yes! It’s absolutely fantastic! and runs great on the rig I put together.  1 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Categories 7K All Categories 1.1K The Blog 38 What's Trending 167 How to & Technical Guides 11 Computer Hardware 119 Software 3 Home Office 6 Networking Audio/Visual 2 Home Automation 16 3D Printers 10 Maker 16 PC Build Guides 96 Reviews & Buying Guides 34 Build Showcase 17 Contests 39 Past Contests 1K The Community 1.8K General Discussion 84 New Members 127 Consumer Tech 42 Prebuilt PCs and Laptops 78 Software 4 Audio/Visual 13 Networking & Security 1 Home Automation 2 Digital Photography 3 Content Creators 22 Hobby Boards & Projects 26 3D Printing 53 Retro Arcade/Gaming 86 All Other Tech 1.4K Store Information and Policy 52 Off Topic 6 Community Ideas & Feedback 114 Your Completed Builds 2.7K Build-Your-Own PC 1.7K Help Choosing Parts 227 Graphics Cards 175 CPUs, Memory, and Motherboards 63 Cases and Power Supplies 19 Air and Liquid Cooling 17 Monitors and Displays 30 Peripherals 10 All Other Parts 23 Featured Categories We love seeing what our customers build Submit photos and a description of your PC to our build showcase Submit Now Looking for a little inspiration? See other custom PC builds and get some ideas for what can be done View Build Showcase View builds by: AMD Processors Intel Processors RTX 3090 RTX 3080 RTX 2080 Ti RTX 2080 Super RTX 2070 Super RTX 2070 RTX 2060 Super Radeon RX 5700XT Radeon RX 5700 Air Cooled Liquid Cooled SAME DAY CUSTOM BUILD SERVICE If You Can Dream it, We Can Build it. Services starting at $149.99 More Details Micro Center Homepage Desktops Laptops Computer Parts Computer Accessories Custom PC Builder Build Showcase Networking Electronics 3D Printing Service, Upgrades & Repairs Laptop Battery Replacement Laptop Screen Repair Virus and Malware Removal Hard Drive Recovery and Backup Apple MacBook Repair Custom Built PCs Schedule an Appointment © Vanilla Foundation Theme 2021 Powered By Vanilla Community Article My 1st PC build (work in process) — Micro Center Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker {$smarty.capture.menu} Activity Categories Discussions Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker Home › Help Choosing Parts My 1st PC build (work in process) tubster217 Rochester NY ✭ October 2020 edited January 5 in Help Choosing Parts Hello everyone! I’m new to the PC building community and know few things about pcs. I was wondering if one of you could tell me if all of my parts work together and are not a bottleneck. Thank you to anyone who helps me!  PART w/ LINK Amd Ryzen 5 3600 w/ DDR4 Ram 2 sticks of 8GB https://www.newegg.com/Product/ComboDealDetails?ItemList=Combo.4104109 Gigabyte B450M DS3H motherboard https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07FWY246F/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_i_DD1IFbR05N171 MSI GeForce GTX 1660 Gaming X https://www.newegg.com/msi-geforce-gtx-1660-gtx-1660-gaming-x-6g/p/N82E16814137401?Item=N82E16814137401&Source=socialshare&cm_mmc=snc-social-_-sr-_-14-137-401-_-10172020 Western Digital 500GB WD Blue 3D NAND Internal PC SSD https://www.amazon.com/dp/B073SBX6TY/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_i_gFbuFbX72J7GS 600W 80+ Gold Power Supply Segotep https://www.amazon.com/dp/B0832KN3RV/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_i_LolLFb3XKD4H7?_encoding=UTF8&psc=1 Cudy WE3000 AX 3000mbps Wireless WiFi 6 PCle card w/ Bluetooth 5.0/4.2/4.0 https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B082NZYDDM/ref=ox_sc_saved_title_1?smid=A28ACUCUGPGKAB&psc=1 NZXT H510 Compact ATX Mid-Tower case https://www.newegg.com/matte-white-black-nzxt-h-series-h510-atx-mid-tower/p/N82E16811146317?Description=h510&cm_re=h510-_-11-146-317-_-Product 3 pack 120mm fans https://www.amazon.com/dp/B072LDYKQ6/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_i_GR1IFbG3Z784Y 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Comments TS_EmileC admin October 2020 Welcome to the community! This build looks great. The one thing I would upgrade is your power supply. For future upgrades, you would run into incompatibility for graphic cards. Here is an updated build through our PC builder. https://www.microcenter.com/site/content/custom-pc-builder.aspx?load=dd2a0a4b-e3e3-41a4-8276-c9aa5a12a1b5 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook LandShark admin October 2020 Hello @tubster217 I'd also recommend upgrading your storage in the future. Some games like COD:MW use around 200GB of your storage. Because of that, I'd have to recommend adding at least a 1TB storage drive to your current selection. If you're looking for speed I'd go with https://www.microcenter.com/product/502942/samsung-860-evo-1tb-ssd-3-bit-mlc-v-nand-sata-iii-6gb-s-25-internal-solid-state-drive If you're looking for the budget option, I'd go with this. https://www.microcenter.com/product/600551/seagate-barracuda-2tb-7200rpm-sata-iii-6gb-s-35-internal-hard-drive Hope this helps! 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Lateral Rockville ✭ November 2020 "And at this moment I realized that you fricked up" You shouldn't have gotten a DS3H, they bad. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook LandShark admin November 2020 MightyD said: "And at this moment I realized that you fricked up" You shouldn't have gotten a DS3H, they bad. Why do you think the DS3H is a bad board? 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Categories 7K All Categories 1.1K The Blog 37 What's Trending 167 How to & Technical Guides 11 Computer Hardware 119 Software 3 Home Office 6 Networking Audio/Visual 2 Home Automation 16 3D Printers 10 Maker 16 PC Build Guides 96 Reviews & Buying Guides 34 Build Showcase 17 Contests 39 Past Contests 1K The Community 1.8K General Discussion 84 New Members 127 Consumer Tech 42 Prebuilt PCs and Laptops 78 Software 4 Audio/Visual 13 Networking & Security 1 Home Automation 2 Digital Photography 3 Content Creators 22 Hobby Boards & Projects 26 3D Printing 53 Retro Arcade/Gaming 86 All Other Tech 1.4K Store Information and Policy 52 Off Topic 6 Community Ideas & Feedback 114 Your Completed Builds 2.7K Build-Your-Own PC 1.7K Help Choosing Parts 227 Graphics Cards 175 CPUs, Memory, and Motherboards 63 Cases and Power Supplies 19 Air and Liquid Cooling 17 Monitors and Displays 30 Peripherals 10 All Other Parts 23 Featured Categories We love seeing what our customers build Submit photos and a description of your PC to our build showcase Submit Now Looking for a little inspiration? See other custom PC builds and get some ideas for what can be done View Build Showcase View builds by: AMD Processors Intel Processors RTX 3090 RTX 3080 RTX 2080 Ti RTX 2080 Super RTX 2070 Super RTX 2070 RTX 2060 Super Radeon RX 5700XT Radeon RX 5700 Air Cooled Liquid Cooled SAME DAY CUSTOM BUILD SERVICE If You Can Dream it, We Can Build it. Services starting at $149.99 More Details Micro Center Homepage Desktops Laptops Computer Parts Computer Accessories Custom PC Builder Build Showcase Networking Electronics 3D Printing Service, Upgrades & Repairs Laptop Battery Replacement Laptop Screen Repair Virus and Malware Removal Hard Drive Recovery and Backup Apple MacBook Repair Custom Built PCs Schedule an Appointment © Vanilla Foundation Theme 2021 Powered By Vanilla Community Article Parkville, MD location shipments. — Micro Center Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker {$smarty.capture.menu} Activity Categories Discussions Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker Home › General Discussion Parkville, MD location shipments. sooapo ✭ December 2020 edited June 7 in General Discussion I'm looking to get a GTX 1660 Super but it's no where in stock so I'm wondering what are the shipment days for the Parkville location. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Comments Ian admin December 2020 sooapo said: I'm looking to get a GTX 1660 Super but it's no where in stock so I'm wondering what are the shipment days for the Parkville location. We expect a shipment very soon but are not sure on an exact stock time. To check our latest stock/availability, visit www.microcenter.com, select your local Micro Center at the top of the page and you can view their stock. Store stock is updated regularly during business hours online. You can view all the items our store locations sell directly on our website. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Categories 7K All Categories 1.1K The Blog 37 What's Trending 167 How to & Technical Guides 11 Computer Hardware 119 Software 3 Home Office 6 Networking Audio/Visual 2 Home Automation 16 3D Printers 10 Maker 16 PC Build Guides 96 Reviews & Buying Guides 34 Build Showcase 17 Contests 39 Past Contests 1K The Community 1.8K General Discussion 84 New Members 127 Consumer Tech 42 Prebuilt PCs and Laptops 78 Software 4 Audio/Visual 13 Networking & Security 1 Home Automation 2 Digital Photography 3 Content Creators 22 Hobby Boards & Projects 26 3D Printing 53 Retro Arcade/Gaming 86 All Other Tech 1.4K Store Information and Policy 52 Off Topic 6 Community Ideas & Feedback 114 Your Completed Builds 2.7K Build-Your-Own PC 1.7K Help Choosing Parts 227 Graphics Cards 175 CPUs, Memory, and Motherboards 63 Cases and Power Supplies 19 Air and Liquid Cooling 17 Monitors and Displays 30 Peripherals 10 All Other Parts 23 Featured Categories We love seeing what our customers build Submit photos and a description of your PC to our build showcase Submit Now Looking for a little inspiration? See other custom PC builds and get some ideas for what can be done View Build Showcase View builds by: AMD Processors Intel Processors RTX 3090 RTX 3080 RTX 2080 Ti RTX 2080 Super RTX 2070 Super RTX 2070 RTX 2060 Super Radeon RX 5700XT Radeon RX 5700 Air Cooled Liquid Cooled SAME DAY CUSTOM BUILD SERVICE If You Can Dream it, We Can Build it. Services starting at $149.99 More Details Micro Center Homepage Desktops Laptops Computer Parts Computer Accessories Custom PC Builder Build Showcase Networking Electronics 3D Printing Service, Upgrades & Repairs Laptop Battery Replacement Laptop Screen Repair Virus and Malware Removal Hard Drive Recovery and Backup Apple MacBook Repair Custom Built PCs Schedule an Appointment © Vanilla Foundation Theme 2021 Powered By Vanilla