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Community Article What is the Platinum Collection: MSI — Micro Center Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker {$smarty.capture.menu} Activity Categories Discussions Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker Home › What's Trending What is the Platinum Collection: MSI SeanM admin October 21 edited October 22 in What's Trending Whether you’re a high-speed esports gamer or someone who enjoys the more single-player-focused AAA and narrative games, you want a gaming PC or laptop that gives you great performance so you can enjoy them to their fullest. Building your own PC is one way to get that, but it can feel a little daunting. So can searching through the many hundreds of similar-looking and sounding gaming laptops and PCs available.  That’s why Micro Center created the Platinum Collection. It’s a range of PCs and laptops that you can rest assured are built with quality components, by quality brands. They’ll not only give you great performance in whatever task you set them, but they can guarantee great build quality, solid features, robust warranties, and just as important, a competitive price.  If you’re looking for a new gaming laptop or desktop PC, then consider a Platinum Collection system. It takes the stress and confusion out of picking your next upgrade.   MSI Katana GF66 11UD  One of the best examples of Platinum Collection hardware today is the MSI Katana GF66. It’s a gaming laptop fitted with the latest generation components from the top manufacturers all packed inside a sturdy chassis. It’s also extremely cost competitive with its contemporaries, making it an excellent choice for an entry level gaming laptop.  The MSI Katana GF66 has, at its heart, the Intel Core i7 11800H. That’s an eight-core processor that supports up to 16 simultaneous threads, and has a maximum boost speed of 4.6GHz. It’s blazing fast, and offers amazing performance whether you’re gaming, browsing the web, or transcoding video.  It’s paired with Nvidia’s RTX 3050 Ti graphics chip, a serious upgrade over its predecessor and one of the best entry-level gaming GPUs you’ll find in gaming laptops today. It gives you more than enough graphical power to run any esports game at high frame rates, but it’s also capable of handling higher-fidelity games like Borderlands 3, or Horizon: Zero Dawn without much difficulty. You might not always get a consistent 60 FPS, but if you play around with the settings, it should be more than capable of delivering solid, smooth frame rates at 1080p.  That’s good, because the display in this laptop isn’t just 1080p, it has a 144Hz refresh rate, so if you’re playing at 60 FPS and above, you’ll be able to really enjoy the additional smoothness in animation and fluidity of gameplay at higher frame rates. That helps improve input lag and responsiveness in esports games too, helping you stay competitive.  Battery life for this laptop, like most entry-level gaming laptops, lasts a couple of hours at a time, so you’ll want to stay relatively near a power socket when gaming, but it’s enough to get you through a train journey or short stint in an airport terminal in a pinch.   MSI Katana GF66 11UE  If you need a little more graphical power, then the MSI Katana GF66 is also available with the higher-end Nvidia RTX 3060 graphics chip, too. This GF66 11UE model has the same Intel Core i7-11800H eight core processor and 16GB of high-speed DDR4-3200 memory, but the RTX 3060 gives it that bit more GPU processing power. That helps it deliver higher frame rates, handle extra detail, and take better advantage of both ray tracing and deep learning super sampling.  It’s game dependent, with some showing a more notable difference in power than others, but you can expect on average between a 10 and 20% performance uplift from the RTX 3060 versus the 3050 Ti. That’s most notable at higher detail settings, where the extra CUDA cores of the RTX 3060 can really get to work.  There are some games, however, like Assassin’s Creed Valhalla, and Cyberpunk 2077, where the difference can be far more stark. In those cases, the RTX 3060 can be almost 100% faster. If you have a particular game in mind you want to play with your next gaming laptop, it’s a good idea to see if it’s one of the titles where the RTX 3060 is significantly faster, as it may well be worth spending that bit more to get a much more capable gaming laptop in some cases.  That’s going to be especially true if you want to play games with ray tracing. While there is only a single step on the performance rankings between these two cards, the RTX 3050 Ti mobile GPU has just 20 RT cores, while the RTX 3060 mobile has 30. That’s an enormous increase in ray tracing performance potential, and it shows in benchmarks where the RTX 3050 Ti struggles to hit playable frame rates outside of low settings in games like Control. In comparison, the RTX 3060 has a much easier time maintaining 30-60 FPS in games with ray tracing enabled at various different detail settings.  That’s partly down to the RT cores, but it’s also partly to do with the Tensor cores. Those are what enable Nvidia’s deep learning super sampling (DLSS); that machine learning-driven upscaling technology is all but mandatory in higher fidelity games with ray tracing enabled. The RTX 3060 just does a better job of handling these higher detail games than its lower-end counterpart.  If you want to play prettier games with settings like ray tracing enabled, the MSI Katana GF66 11UE is well worth considering for that little extra graphical grunt.   MSI Sword 17  If you prefer to do your gaming in a relatively static location, but still want the portability of a gaming laptop, then you might want to opt for something with a larger screen. MSI has a great option for that in the Platinum Collection: the Sword 17. This MSI gaming laptop features the same internal hardware as the Katana GF66, but with a bigger display that can aid immersion in any game. It can also make it easier to see your opponents, lending you an extra level of competitiveness that just isn’t possible on smaller laptops.  That larger screen is powered by the same Intel Core i7-11800H and Nvidia RTX 3050 Ti as the Katana GF66 11UD, giving it great entry-level gaming ability at 1080p. That’s enough power to drive high frame rates in esports and older AAA games with ease, which you can take full advantage of thanks to this laptop’s 144Hz display. When you get over 100 FPS, games look much more fluid, and feel more responsive, making it well worth buying a gaming PC that has enough power to hit such frame rates if you’re playing faster paced games. That’s especially true in competitive games, where a higher frame rate and refresh rate can improve input lag, making you respond faster in turn.  Another advantage of the larger chassis on the MSI Sword is that it has the space for an HDMI output. That’s perfect if you want to occasionally play on a larger external display, as you can simply hook your MSI gaming laptop up to the bigger screen to take advantage of an even larger, or better monitor.  The extra physical size of the sword does mean that it’s a bit heavier too, but only by half a pound. A five-pound laptop isn’t particularly svelte by modern standards, but there are few gaming laptops that are both light and powerful, especially at this kind of affordable price.  One other reason you might want to opt for the MSI Sword 17 is its unique look. Where the MSI Katana GF66 laptops are quite understated and don’t stand out much, the MSI Sword 17 really makes its mark with its stark white and black paint job. The inside of the keyboard, and the outside of the lid are both white, while the monitor bezels and underside of the main body are black, giving it a great looking two-tone paint job that is really accented by the keyboard backlighting.  Like the other MSI gaming laptops in the Micro Center Platinum Collection, this model also enjoys support for Wi-Fi 5 and 6, and a Gigabit Ethernet port, for fast network connections. USB-A and USB-C ports also make it a cinch to connect all your most important external accessories and controllers, so you can game the way you want on your new portable gaming PC. Want more information on the Platinum Collection? Check out our breakdown over here. And if you're looking for more fantastic computers, be sure to check out our Platinum Collection, or visit us in person for even more options! 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Leave a Comment Rich Text Editor. To edit a paragraph's style, hit tab to get to the paragraph menu. From there you will be able to pick one style. Nothing defaults to paragraph. An inline formatting menu will show up when you select text. Hit tab to get into that menu. Some elements, such as rich link embeds, images, loading indicators, and error messages may get inserted into the editor. You may navigate to these using the arrow keys inside of the editor and delete them with the delete or backspace key. Comment As ... 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See other custom PC builds and get some ideas for what can be done View Build Showcase View builds by: AMD Processors Intel Processors RTX 3090 RTX 3080 RTX 2080 Ti RTX 2080 Super RTX 2070 Super RTX 2070 RTX 2060 Super Radeon RX 5700XT Radeon RX 5700 Air Cooled Liquid Cooled SAME DAY CUSTOM BUILD SERVICE If You Can Dream it, We Can Build it. Services starting at $149.99 More Details Micro Center Homepage Desktops Laptops Computer Parts Computer Accessories Custom PC Builder Build Showcase Networking Electronics 3D Printing Service, Upgrades & Repairs Laptop Battery Replacement Laptop Screen Repair Virus and Malware Removal Hard Drive Recovery and Backup Apple MacBook Repair Custom Built PCs Schedule an Appointment © Vanilla Foundation Theme 2021 Powered By Vanilla Community Article How to Choose PC Parts: The Processor — Micro Center Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker {$smarty.capture.menu} Activity Categories Discussions Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker Home › Reviews & Buying Guides How to Choose PC Parts: The Processor TSTonyV admin April 2020 edited May 1 in Reviews & Buying Guides If you’re reading this post, you’re probably here for one reason: you want to build a new PC. Whether it’s your first time building or you’re an experienced builder and just need some extra clarification, this post is for you. With all the options available on the market, it can be overwhelming, but we’re here to help break it down.   If you’re looking for other parts as well, be sure to check out some of our other guides: How to Choose PC Parts: The Video Card How to Choose PC Parts: The Motherboard How to Choose PC Parts: RAM How to Choose PC Parts: The Power Supply How to Choose PC Parts: SSDs and Hard Drives How to Choose PC Parts: The Case   But before we dive into picking our processor, or CPU, we need to answer some basic questions: What is your budget? The most basic and simple question that will determine everything about your build. For most of you out there, every single dollar counts, and squeezing as much value out of your build as you can will be the most important thing. If you only have a budget of $800, over-spending on one part can severely limit your other options or cause a mismatch in performance.  What are you using this computer for? Are you a competitive gamer that needs to have a perfectly stable 144Hz refresh rate in all your favorite FPS titles? Maybe you’re a video editor and looking to speed up your production workflow. How you’re using the system will be the other largest factor in determining what parts you should look at.  We’ve broken down our list by price and use case so it’ll be easy for you to jump right to the processor you need. But, there are a few other things you might want to know before picking a CPU. Things to Know When Picking a CPU: What are Threads and Cores?  Modern CPUs are packing in more cores and threads than ever, but if you don’t know what that means, it’s not exactly useful information. Put simply, while you have one single CPU, it will physically have multiple “cores” which are essentially mini-CPUs that can each perform tasks on their own. Hyper-threading divides each physical core into two “logical” cores (also known as threads) and basically tricks your operating system into thinking each individual core is actually two, which allows them to do more things simultaneously.  In other words, a CPU is kind of like an office. Each “core” is an individual worker performing tasks, and each “thread” would be like each person using one hand to do one thing, while the other hand does something else at the same time. How many workers you need and how many hands they should use depends on what you’re doing.  Video games historically have been single-thread reliant. Modern games have been getting better at utilizing more cores, but the benefits of more cores usually stop when you hit 6-8 cores total and beyond that you’ll see diminishing returns, at least for now.  The same is true for some professional applications like Adobe Photoshop and After Effects. Depending on exactly what you’re doing, after a certain number of cores you get diminishing returns and what’s most important is your single-threaded speed.  Other tasks care a LOT about having lots and lots of cores, like rendering with V-Ray or Cinema 4d. If you’re doing more than just gaming and other everyday tasks, it’s important to understand your workload and what it needs the most. That type of discussion could have it’s own dedicated article, but Puget Systems has a ton of great recommendations and explanations for all sorts of design, content creation and other professional workloads. If that’s the sort of detailed information you’re looking for, I’d definitely check them out.  How to Read Intel CPU Names: What does i7-10700k mean? To break it down, the first part designates the tier of the processor. These range from i3 at the entry level, i5 in the mid range, i7 on the high end and i9 at the top. The second part is the model number, which you can use to determine the generation, e.g. a 10### is a tenth-generation processor, a 9### is a ninth-generation. The last three digits, AKA the SKU, in the model number establish its spot in the product stack, higher being better (generally speaking), e.g the i5-10600k is higher than the i5-10400, though they are both mid-tier i5 processors from the 10th generation.  If you see a K at the end of the processor name, it means it’s unlocked and can be overclocked. All Intel CPUs come with integrated graphics unless you see an F at the end, which means the processor does not include integrated graphics.  How to Read AMD CPU Names: AMD follows a similar naming scheme as intel. The 7 in a Ryzen 7 5800X indicates the tier the CPU represents, Ryzen 3 being entry-level up to Ryzen 9 at the top. The 5### shows the current generation of processor. #600 is the model number, increasing with the power of the CPU. The X simply designates it as an ever-so-slightly faster counterpart to a CPU without the X (e.g., Ryzen 5 3600 vs 3600X).  Unlike Intel, all AMD Ryzen processors are unlocked by default. All AMD Ryzen processors come without integrated graphics unless you see a G at the end, which indicates ones that do include integrated graphics.  What is Overclocking? we have a full explainer of overclocking (link) if you want to get deep with it, but the gist is using your motherboard’s BIOS to push past the speed set by the CPU manufacturer to get more CPU power. However, it comes with risks and a lot of PC builders will never overclock, let alone need to overclock.  The Big Question: With those things in mind, let's dig into choosing your Processor. And of course, we have to start with The Big Question: Intel or AMD? If you’d asked that question 5 or 10 years ago, there was only one answer: Intel was the king and AMD was relegated to competing only in the super-budget areas. But a LOT has changed in the last four years. In 2017, AMD came back into the fold with their new Ryzen 1000 series CPUs, offering good enough single-threaded performance while offering a high number of cores/threads at great prices. They were a great value proposition for gamers and became competitive in multi-threaded workloads. AMD made iterative improvements until, with the latest Ryzen 5000 series, they’ve actually surpassed Intel in single-threaded and multithreaded performance. You have to pay a premium for the processors, but they are pretty much the best on the market right now.  So why choose Intel? Well, unless you have unlimited money, you should always go with whatever gives you the best value.  AMD’s 5000 series may be ahead of Intel, but the lead is not so significant that you should just ignore Intel entirely. Intel still offers good performance, even if it’s no longer chart-topping, and when you're on a budget, every dollar counts. Losing 5% performance to save 15% of the cost may be worth it.  Pay attention to prices and choose what gives you the most bang for your buck.    What CPUs should I buy? Updated 4/2/2021 for Intel 11th generation CPUs There’s a lot of CPUs to choose from, so we’ve tried to break it down into different price/performance tiers to make it easier for you to make a choice. Keep in mind that prices on these CPUs can change as sales come and go. These are rough recommendations for what to expect, and what kind of prices you should be targeting to make sure you get good value.  Under ~$200: Entry Level Gaming If you’re gaming on a budget, there’s a lot of solid options under $200 that will be plenty powerful. These days our general recommendation for gaming is that you should go for a CPU with at least 4 cores/8 threads. Modern games have been getting better at utilizing more cores/threads and this has become the baseline. Thankfully, most budget CPUs are now offering at least that many, with some in this category offering 6 cores/12 threads which has become the new sweetspot for modern titles.  Intel i4-11400: Say hello to the new budget king. The 11400 is the 6 core/12 thread followup to the 10400, and in gaming this CPU consistently beats the Ryzen 5 3600 while coming in at the same price point of ~$180-200. It can be upwards of 20% faster, though it varies depending on the game you're playing. The 11400 is arguably the best overall value from Intel's 11th generation when you consider the performance and price.  Ryzen 5 3600: Once the king of overall value, the Ryzen 5 3600 is still a good option but now sees hefty competition in the $180-200 price range. The 11400 is faster in gaming so for most people out there, it's the better buy. The 3600 does have one advantage in that if you're looking for multi-core performance and are on a very strict budget, it generally beats the 11400 in those types of workloads.  Intel i3-10100F: The i3-10100F usually sits around $100 and if you’re on a really tight budget, is a great choice. It hits our 4 core/8 thread “minimum,” so gets the job done for gaming. If you aren’t gaming but just need a CPU for general use, and therefore don’t need a video card, the i3-10100 has integrated graphics and is a great daily driver. Intel i5-10400F: The 10400F can be had for around $140 so this is still a good budget-gaming option, but with how close the 11400 is in price and the performance uplift you get, I would recommend spending the extra dollars on that instead if at all possible.  ~$200-350: The Sweetspot  This is where you start getting into the high-end gaming options. If all you’re doing is gaming, you don’t need to spend any more than this unless you have a ton of budget and really care about that last couple percentage points of performance. If you’re doing work that relies a lot on single-threaded performance like Photoshop and isn’t really multi-thread intensive, this is a great spot to be in without breaking the bank. It’s also a great entry point if you’re looking for multi-thread performance and can’t quite afford the higher tier options. For most users out there, you’ll never need to spend any more than this on a CPU.  Intel i5-11600k: The 11600k takes the fight back to AMD in the mid-range and is arguably the new "best all around gaming" CPU. It goes toe-to-toe with the 5600X in gaming, trading the lead depending on whether the title is AMD favored or Intel favored, and generally coming in at a lower price of $260-280. The one knock it has is that in multi-threaded/production type workloads, the 5600X will generally pull ahead, but if you don't care about that, this is a great choice.  AMD Ryzen 5 5600X: The 5600X is a great CPU: in gaming it has nearly chart topping performance, matching or within a few percent of the higher end 5900X and 5950X, but at a much lower price and therefore offering strong value. Generally you’ll find this CPU for $300. It's also a strong option if you're looking for gaming with some production/multi-threaded performance on the side, it will usually pull ahead of the 11600k in those categories.  Intel i5-10600k: The 10600k is the former best-all-around gaming CPU. While the 5600X and 11600k beat it, it’s still a strong choice and with the release of the 11600k can be found for close to $200, and at that price it's hard to beat. It also comes with integrated graphics if that’s something you want or need.  Intel i7-10700k: The 10700k basically occupies the same spot as the 3700X at 8 cores/16 threads, but it’s better in gaming and other single-thread reliant work . If you’re only gaming, then a 5600X or 10600k would be the better choice, but if you need a good balance of both, this is a compelling choice. With recent price cuts and the launch of the 11th gen Intel parts, the 10700k can be found under $300 and is a strong value at that price.  AMD Ryzen 7 3700X: The 3700X is not as strong in gaming as the 5600X or 10600k, but since this packs 8 cores/16 threads, it will beat them in multi-threaded scenarios. If you’re not super concerned with maximum FPS and think you need those extra cores, this chip offers some excellent overall value around ~$300. It also comes with a pretty solid stock cooler which adds to its value proposition, since a decent aftermarket cooler is going to run $30+ normally. Intel i7-9700k: The 9700k used to be arguably the best gaming processor on the market right behind the i9-9900k, and is still a great choice, especially with how low the prices can be at times. Gaming performance will be about the same as 10600k, but the 9700k does not have hyper-threading so it’s only 8 cores/8 threads so it lags behind competitors like the 3700X in multi-threaded work. So if you’re only gaming, this is worth a look and can be found close to $200.    $400-500: Hardcore gamer/editor Now you’re playing with the real big boys. This is where you start to see some chart-toppers for gaming and single-thread performance, and where the CPUs really pack in the cores/threads for people that are doing a lot of multi-threaded work.  AMD Ryzen 7 5800X: The 5800X is in a weird spot. It has great performance when you just look at the numbers: near chart-topping gaming performance, while handily beating the 10700k and 3700X in multi-threaded scenarios. But at nearly the same price, the 10900k packs in an extra two cores while matching it in gaming performance. If you’re really after multi-threaded performance, the 3900X is also nearly the same price but has four more cores. At ~$450, this is hard to recommend.  Intel i9-10850k: This is exactly the same as the 10900k, but slightly slower because it can’t quite hit the same clock speeds consistently. However, unless you really care about that extra couple percent of performance, this is the better value. Typically it's around $400 but Micro Center has recently listed this even as low as $320 which is an absolute steal.  Intel i9-10900k: Formerly the best gaming CPU, the 10900k packs in 10 cores/20 threads with great single-threaded performance. If you care a lot about gaming performance and multi-threaded capabilities, but can’t quite afford something like a 5900X, this is the next best thing and can be had for ~$470, Micro Center has listed this part as low as $400.  AMD Ryzen 9 3900X: The 3900X packs in 12 cores/24 threads, two more than its closest competitors in the same tier, while still being pretty good in the single-threaded/gaming department. Under $500, this processor is the king of multi-thread performance, so if that’s what you want, this is where you should look. It used to be commonly available for $400 which was crazy value, but nowadays is usually around ~$450.  Intel i7-11700k: If the 5800X is in a weird spot, the 11700k is in an ever more weird spot. Unlike the 11600k that saw meaningful improvement over it's previous gen counterpart, the 11700k sees virtually no tangible/consistent performance increase over the 10700k. On top of that, the 5800X beats it in most scenarios. Intel's 11th gen parts do support PCIe 4.0 and AVX512, so if you need those two things, then maybe this is worth consideration, but otherwise, at ~$400 you might as well save your money and buy a 10700k or 10850k instead.  $500+: Elite gaming/workstation powerhouse This is the top of the ladder. The cream of the crop.  Whether you’re a hardcore gamer who needs to squeeze out every last frame, or you’re a designer/professional needing to optimize your workflow, these are the best of the best for a consumer platform.  AMD Ryzen 9 5900X: The 5900X is just a monster. It’s arguably the best gaming CPU on the market now with blistering single-core performance, and still packs in 12 cores/24 threads so it still maintains really impressive multi-core performance. It’s priced right at ~$550 and at that price point, nothing really matches it.  AMD Ryzen 9 5950X: The 5950X packs a whopping 16 cores/32 threads under the hood. It also costs a whopping $800. With that in mind, this is a processor specifically for doing a lot of multi-core intensive work. It’s a chart-topper for single-threaded and gaming performance, so if you also do that, then you can’t go wrong. But if gaming/single thread is your main/only focus you should just get a 5900X instead of this. This a processor for enthusiasts or professionals who are doing lots of work that can fully utilize all 32 of those threads.  AMD Ryzen 9 3950X: Also with 16 cores/32 threads, the Ryzen 9 3950X falls into the same category as the 5950X, but with slower single-threaded speed.  If you can’t quite afford the 5950X, but still need as much multi-core performance as possible, you can find this around ~$680. Intel i9-11900k: The 11900k is... not good. It's basically the 11700k with a mild boost in clock speed that sees you gain a couple percent of performance in the best case scenario. It's down to 8 cores vs the 10 of the 10900k/10850k and loses to those in multi-thread reliant scenarios, let alone the 12 core 5900X. At $550, there's no reason to buy this compared to the current competition, or even compared to it's previous generation counterparts.  If you have follow-up questions feel free to comment below, and if you’re still looking for part recommendations, we have guides for Video Cards, Motherboards, RAM, Power Supplies, Hard Drives, and Cases. 2 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Comments JasonA ✭ May 2020 There doesn't seem to be a dedicated article in this series that gives advice regarding selection of cooling fans or liquid coolers. In particular I'm looking for something to go with an i7-9700K setup designed to run Adobe Lightroom Classic and Photoshop. Any suggestions ? 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook TSMichaelB admin May 2020 JasonA said: There doesn't seem to be a dedicated article in this series that gives advice regarding selection of cooling fans or liquid coolers. In particular I'm looking for something to go with an i7-9700K setup designed to run Adobe Lightroom Classic and Photoshop. Any suggestions ? Great question. In regards to fans, it will depend on the intended use of the fans. If they are simply going on a chassis for additional airflow, then look for fans specifically rated for high airflow or a high CFM volume. I am a fan of Noctua's black industrial fans such as the Noctua NF-F12, but I do not believe we carry those particular fans anymore. A strong contender for second place would be Corsair's AF120/AF140's as they offer great airflow and are not all that loud.  If you are looking for radiator fans, you'll need static pressure fans. While you can use high airflow fans and run them at an extremely high RPM to force air through the fin stacks, it's going to be obnoxiously loud as they are not purpose built to force air through something with a lot of resistance. My favorite radiator fans are Corsair's MagLev series. They offer a strong static pressure rating AND high airflow, so you get the best of both worlds here. They also use a magnetic bearing and run extremely quiet. I have 18 of these in a push/pull configuration on a 1260mm radiator and cannot hear them running despite my radiator being external and on top of my desk. As for liquid cooler recommendations, this will depend on your chassis size. I personally recommend 240/280mm radiators depending on chassis support. 120mm radiators are no better than high end air coolers, and 360mm radiators suffer from diminishing returns due to the AIO's pump being the bottleneck in most situations. A larger radiator will help you stave off higher temperatures for a little longer, but once the liquid in the loop reaches thermal equilibrium, it won't matter at that point. I personally prefer AIO's that use Asetek pumps. This would be Corsair's H series AIO's, NZXT's Kraken series, EVGA's CLC series, and Thermaltake's Floe series. If you are looking for recommendations on a custom loop watercooling setup, then that will require a full list of your components so we can determine what needs cooled, how much space you have for radiators, pump/reservoir and tubing. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook JasonA ✭ May 2020 edited May 2020 Thanks @TSMichaelB ! What I'm really looking at are the fan + radiator combinations for the CPU. I really don't want to go down the liquid cooling path at this stage if I can get by without it. So I've been looking at the Noctua range, NH-U14S, NH-D15 or NH-D15S, which are in the $90-$115 range, but then I also see much cheaper options like the Cooler Master Hyper 212 series for $35 - $45. The last time I had a custom-built PC, it was a Pentium 4 3.0GHz with HyperThreading, and that worked perfectly well with a stock Intel fan and heatsink. Obviously a lot has changed since then in the last 15 years !!! So now I'm trying to play "catch up" on the technology !!! My current build parts list is as follows: https://www.microcenter.com/site/content/custom-pc-builder.aspx?load=80c7c09e-42a2-4a9b-add1-140cbb8d8d5c I am also thinking of using the Corsair SPEC-02 case. I like the look and the magnetic mesh on the cooling vents. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook TSMichaelB admin May 2020 JasonA said: Thanks @TSMichaelB ! What I'm really looking at are the fan + radiator combinations for the CPU. I really don't want to go down the liquid cooling path at this stage if I can get by without it. So I've been looking at the Noctua range, NH-U14S, NH-D15 or NH-D15S, which are in the $90-$115 range, but then I also see much cheaper options like the Cooler Master Hyper 212 series for $35 - $45. The last time I had a custom-built PC, it was a Pentium 4 3.0GHz with HyperThreading, and that worked perfectly well with a stock Intel fan and heatsink. Obviously a lot has changed since then in the last 15 years !!! So now I'm trying to play "catch up" on the technology !!! My current build parts list is as follows: https://www.microcenter.com/site/content/custom-pc-builder.aspx?load=80c7c09e-42a2-4a9b-add1-140cbb8d8d5c I am also thinking of using the Corsair SPEC-02 case. I like the look and the magnetic mesh on the cooling vents. Honestly for what you're describing, I think the Hyper 212 series would work fine. If you are overclocking, then I would recommend the Noctua D15's as they can compete with some of the higher end AIO liquid coolers and should be plenty for any overclocking you intend to do, but if you plan to run it at stock clock/turbo boost speeds and use it for content creation, the Hyper 212 Black Edition would be my recommendation. The stock fan that comes on it works perfectly fine, but if you wanted to replace it with anything, a Noctua NF-F12 would be great, or a Corsair ML120 would be my second recommendation. I'd start with the stock fan first and if you find its noise to be louder than your preferences.  If you do go with the larger NH D15, be very careful with your RAM heatspreaders. The fans will likely cover the first DIMM slot on your motherboard, and ram with tall heatspreaders will interfere with the fans.You can try to lift the fans up some more, but depending on your chassis, you may be limited on Z height depending on your side panel. As for the actual chassis, the Spec 02 is pretty solid. If you prefer a more minimalist design, I strongly recommend taking a look at this: https://www.microcenter.com/product/606985/cooler-master-nr600-masterbox-tempered-glass-atx-mid-tower-computer-case---black. The entire front panel is mesh and is designed for high airflow. I don't believe it has a magnetic dust filter, but the front panel is removable simply by pulling on it from the front and is extremely easy to clean. If you ever decided to go with liquid cooling in the future, it has support for several different radiator configurations. As for the rest of your build, your part selection looks very solid. 2 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Rinati75 ✭ August 2020 How do I get to Part 2? 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook TSPhillipT admin August 2020 Hello @Rinati75 You can find the whole series of posts here.   0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Leave a Comment Rich Text Editor. 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Categories 6.7K All Categories 1K The Blog 36 What's Trending 164 How to & Technical Guides 10 Computer Hardware 119 Software 3 Home Office 6 Networking Audio/Visual 2 Home Automation 15 3D Printers 9 Maker 15 PC Build Guides 81 Reviews & Buying Guides 27 Build Showcase 13 Contests 35 Past Contests 824 The Community 1.7K General Discussion 105 New Members 87 Consumer Tech 27 Prebuilt PCs and Laptops 75 Software 2 Audio/Visual 12 Networking & Security 1 Home Automation 2 Digital Photography 3 Content Creators 21 Hobby Boards & Projects 23 3D Printing 49 Retro Arcade/Gaming 80 All Other Tech 1.2K Store Information and Policy 49 Off Topic 5 Community Ideas & Feedback 111 Your Completed Builds 2.6K Build-Your-Own PC 1.7K Help Choosing Parts 220 Graphics Cards 161 CPUs, Memory, and Motherboards 61 Cases and Power Supplies 19 Air and Liquid Cooling 13 Monitors and Displays 29 Peripherals 9 All Other Parts 21 Featured Categories We love seeing what our customers build Submit photos and a description of your PC to our build showcase Submit Now Looking for a little inspiration? See other custom PC builds and get some ideas for what can be done View Build Showcase View builds by: AMD Processors Intel Processors RTX 3090 RTX 3080 RTX 2080 Ti RTX 2080 Super RTX 2070 Super RTX 2070 RTX 2060 Super Radeon RX 5700XT Radeon RX 5700 Air Cooled Liquid Cooled SAME DAY CUSTOM BUILD SERVICE If You Can Dream it, We Can Build it. Services starting at $149.99 More Details Micro Center Homepage Desktops Laptops Computer Parts Computer Accessories Custom PC Builder Build Showcase Networking Electronics 3D Printing Service, Upgrades & Repairs Laptop Battery Replacement Laptop Screen Repair Virus and Malware Removal Hard Drive Recovery and Backup Apple MacBook Repair Custom Built PCs Schedule an Appointment © Vanilla Foundation Theme 2021 Powered By Vanilla Community Article PowerSpec 1530 Review: Portable Powerhouse — Micro Center Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker {$smarty.capture.menu} Activity Categories Discussions Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker Home › Reviews & Buying Guides PowerSpec 1530 Review: Portable Powerhouse AlexS admin September 2020 edited May 1 in Reviews & Buying Guides Who is PowerSpec? PowerSpec is Micro Center’s in-house brand for a handful of products, focused primarily on pre-built gaming desktop computers and high-performance gaming laptops. Our goal has always been to provide you high-quality systems at a competitive price, with the support to back it up, and our most recent entry into the series is the PowerSpec 1530 laptop.  First impressions At first glance, the 1530 looks pretty standard, but there are some subtle hints you can pick up on that show what this system is all about. The orange trim around the sides adds a little bit of flair that you wouldn’t see on a laptop designed for business use. It’s thick and heavy when you pick it up, compared to other 15-inch laptops and everything on it just feels solid. Of course, the lightning-bolt P logo for PowerSpec is a giveaway that this isn’t your typical HP or Dell system.  Please use the links below to jump to different sections of this review Specifications Peripherals Performance As always, if you have any questions, feel free to post them on the comments below! Written by TSTonyV 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Comments AlexS admin September 2020 edited October 2020 Specifications We can’t talk about a high-powered gaming laptop without going over the specs, and the 1530 delivers. The i7-10875H is one of the most powerful consumer laptop CPUs that you can get, and the 2070 Super is a high-end GPU that should handle pretty much any game you throw at it. The 240Hz IPS panel is another big highlight here and will be fantastic for high refresh rate gaming. Top it off with 32GB of RAM and 1TB of NVMe SSD storage, and you have a blazing fast system front to back.  External Ports and Features I/O is nothing to scoff at either. Three USB 3.1 Type-A ports, one USB-C, and one Thunderbolt 3 port give you many options for connecting a multitude of peripherals. The Thunderbolt 3, mini DisplayPort 1.4, and HDMI 2.0 ports provide a wide range of connectivity for monitors along with that. The SD card reader is a nice bonus, as well. Overall, connectivity is good, and you have a range of options available.  0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook AlexS admin September 2020 edited October 2020 Peripherals Display The display is one of the most critical parts of a system, and I think you’ll be impressed with the 1080p/240Hz IPS display on the 1530. IPS panels have become very popular recently as a general use monitor due to the good balance between picture quality, color accuracy, refresh rate, and response times for various scenarios. This one is no exception. Brightness is good, and I never felt like I was in a situation where I needed more. Picture quality was good as expected and matched my expectations for the display on a laptop like this. At 15 inches, I think 1080p is the right mark for resolution as well. Overall this is a high quality display.  Keyboard The keyboard is pretty standard as far as laptop keyboards go and uses the typical chiclet membrane style keys. I can type 110-120 words per minute on my desktop keyboard and hit that mark on this keyboard pretty consistently. The keyboard is RGB backlit, and you can customize and control the lighting through the Control Center software included with the system. You can choose from several pre-set effects and individually set static colors for keys on the keyboard. The backlight can be very bright if you need it to be.    Touchpad I was very surprised by the touchpad. It’s glass and incredibly smooth to the touch, and may be my favorite touchpad I’ve used on any laptop. The buttons for right and left click feel solid, and I never had any issues with weird sensitivity or inconsistencies when moving my mouse around. Palm rejection was also good, as I never found myself accidentally clicking and dragging the cursor while typing. There’s a built-in fingerprint reader if you want to use that feature to sign in to Windows. Webcam The webcam is pretty standard as far as laptops go. It operates at 1280x720p resolution and can record video at 30FPS. It will work perfectly fine if you need it for zoom meetings and the like.  Speakers The speakers on the laptop are good for general daily use. They can get quite loud and I didn’t experience any distortion or issues with audio. Being laptop speakers they’re not going to have the same quality as a pair of dedicated desktop speakers or a pair of headphones, but they’ll work just fine otherwise. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook AlexS admin September 2020 edited October 2020 Performance   Daily Use For general daily use, it’s blazing fast with the hardware included. The main question you probably have is battery life. At max brightness on the display and keyboard, while set to the “entertainment” power mode in Control Center, I ended up with about 3 hours of battery life when running a handful of browser tabs open and playing YouTube videos in the background. With reduced brightness/backlight and battery saver settings on, you should be able to extend that further. At stock settings the fan can get fairly loud when it kicks in, so you may also want to consider setting a custom fan curve to help reduce noise during everyday use.  Gaming As you might expect based on the specs, this system should perform very well in games, and I’d say overall it did very well. All testing was conducted on “performance” power mode in the Control Center software, with fan speed control set to “automatic.” I tested a handful of popular titles to try and give a wide range of experiences. All temperatures and CPU frequency figures were obtained from Intel Extreme Tuning Utility running the background.  Response times in general were good and felt on par with the desktop displays I’ve used for gaming. The fan kicks up to 100% speed immediately once a game is open, which is to be expected. It comes with the territory on gaming laptops, but I’d definitely recommend using headphones if you’re gaming because the fan will be quite loud when running at max speed.  Call of Duty: Modern Warfare Modern Warfare was the first game to test on my list. Graphics settings were set to maximum wherever possible, with 100% render resolution and 100% field-of-view. Motion blur, ray tracing, and v-sync were all disabled.  In standard multiplayer matches (no ground war), I achieved anywhere from 110-130FPS, varying a bit depending on which map I was playing on. In Warzone, it was mostly the same, FPS generally hovered around 120FPS with spikes up or down depending on the specific area. The CPU hit 100C and throttled down to 3.6-3.7GHz in regular multiplayer, but throttled down to 3.4-3.5 in Warzone.  Overwatch Overwatch was the second game on the list, representing a bit of a lighter but well optimized title in comparison to Call of Duty. Testing was done at Epic settings with V-sync disabled.  I was able to achieve 110-130FPS, with the CPU throttling down to 3.8-3.9GHz and hitting 80-90C. Keep in mind with Overwatch that “Epic” settings don’t have a drastic increase in visual quality over “Ultra” settings. You’ll be hard pressed to notice the differences and you can gain quite a bit of FPS by running at Ultra settings instead. On Ultra settings depending on the map/area FPS should be able to go over 200.  Valorant Valorant is the new kid on the block in the competitive FPS sphere, and as expected, it performed very well as it’s relatively light on your system,  the lightest title of the games I tested. Testing was done at high settings with v-sync disabled, MSAA 4x, and 8x anisotropic filtering. I could get anywhere from 220-300FPS, fluctuating frequently, but I did not experience any screen tearing or stuttering: everything was very smooth and responsive. The CPU hit 80C and throttled down to about 3.6-3.8GHz.  Apex Legends Apex Legends, the second battle royale on this list, is somewhere in between Call of Duty and Valorant with how heavy it is on your system. Testing was done at max settings with max field-of-view and v-sync disabled.  The CPU hit 100C in this title and throttled down to about 3.5-3.6GHz; I could get anywhere from 130-250FPS depending on what location of the map I was in. Like in Valorant, there was no stuttering or screen tearing, so the fluctuations in FPS didn’t have any detrimental effects on my gameplay experience.  Horizon Zero Dawn Horizon Zero Dawn made it to PC recently on Steam and is more representative of a graphically intense title than the lighter competitive FPS titles. Plus, the game is just gorgeous, so I thought it’d be an excellent way to round out our testing. Graphics were set to the “favor quality” pre-set in-game, putting most of the settings at “high.” V-sync and motion blur were disabled.  During general gameplay, I achieved roughly 80FPS, fluctuating up and down depending on the specific area. The CPU only hit 2.5-3.0GHz in this title at 80C, which I found interesting. I’m not entirely sure why this occurred, but my experience was smooth, and I didn’t experience any weird stutters or frame drops during my play session. I assume that the CPU simply didn’t need to boost any higher with this game generally being more GPU bound, but I don’t know the specifics. Overall the gameplay experience was very good.  0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook AlexS admin September 2020 edited October 2020 Conclusion Overall, this is a powerful gaming system that I think anybody will be thrilled to have. It performed very well, and overall build quality is good. It also comes in at an excellent price compared to other laptops with similar specs. If you’re looking for a high-powered gaming laptop at a reasonable price, I recommend the PowerSpec 1530. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Leave a Comment Rich Text Editor. To edit a paragraph's style, hit tab to get to the paragraph menu. From there you will be able to pick one style. Nothing defaults to paragraph. An inline formatting menu will show up when you select text. Hit tab to get into that menu. Some elements, such as rich link embeds, images, loading indicators, and error messages may get inserted into the editor. You may navigate to these using the arrow keys inside of the editor and delete them with the delete or backspace key. Comment As ... Categories 6.7K All Categories 1K The Blog 36 What's Trending 164 How to & Technical Guides 10 Computer Hardware 119 Software 3 Home Office 6 Networking Audio/Visual 2 Home Automation 15 3D Printers 9 Maker 15 PC Build Guides 81 Reviews & Buying Guides 27 Build Showcase 13 Contests 35 Past Contests 824 The Community 1.7K General Discussion 105 New Members 87 Consumer Tech 27 Prebuilt PCs and Laptops 75 Software 2 Audio/Visual 12 Networking & Security 1 Home Automation 2 Digital Photography 3 Content Creators 21 Hobby Boards & Projects 23 3D Printing 49 Retro Arcade/Gaming 80 All Other Tech 1.2K Store Information and Policy 49 Off Topic 5 Community Ideas & Feedback 111 Your Completed Builds 2.6K Build-Your-Own PC 1.7K Help Choosing Parts 220 Graphics Cards 161 CPUs, Memory, and Motherboards 61 Cases and Power Supplies 19 Air and Liquid Cooling 13 Monitors and Displays 29 Peripherals 9 All Other Parts 21 Featured Categories We love seeing what our customers build Submit photos and a description of your PC to our build showcase Submit Now Looking for a little inspiration? See other custom PC builds and get some ideas for what can be done View Build Showcase View builds by: AMD Processors Intel Processors RTX 3090 RTX 3080 RTX 2080 Ti RTX 2080 Super RTX 2070 Super RTX 2070 RTX 2060 Super Radeon RX 5700XT Radeon RX 5700 Air Cooled Liquid Cooled SAME DAY CUSTOM BUILD SERVICE If You Can Dream it, We Can Build it. Services starting at $149.99 More Details Micro Center Homepage Desktops Laptops Computer Parts Computer Accessories Custom PC Builder Build Showcase Networking Electronics 3D Printing Service, Upgrades & Repairs Laptop Battery Replacement Laptop Screen Repair Virus and Malware Removal Hard Drive Recovery and Backup Apple MacBook Repair Custom Built PCs Schedule an Appointment © Vanilla Foundation Theme 2021 Powered By Vanilla Community Article EVGA Gaming Z15, Z20 and X17 Peripheral Review — Micro Center Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker {$smarty.capture.menu} Activity Categories Discussions Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker Home › Reviews & Buying Guides EVGA Gaming Z15, Z20 and X17 Peripheral Review SeanM admin March 19 edited April 21 in Reviews & Buying Guides EVGA recently launched three new peripherals: two mechanical gaming keyboards, the Z15, and the Z20, and a versatile gaming mouse, the X17. I got to spend a week or so with each and unpack what makes each of them unique and worthy additions to your desk. EVGA Z15 Mechanical Gaming Keyboard EVGA’s new Z15 mechanical gaming keyboard is the most instantly recognizable of the three. It's fairly unassuming, only slightly larger than your average membrane keyboard, clocking in at a sleek and simple 5.94”x17.52”x1.48”. But don’t let its modest appearance fool you, the EVGA Z15 comes prepared to work. Built on top of a solid chassis, the metal plating under the keys offers both an unbendable base for heavy gaming sessions and a great reflective surface for the Z15’s per-key RGB lighting. And since it is per-key RGB lighting, you can make the Z15 uniquely yours by customizing each and every key with EVGA’s RGB Unleash Software (we’ll get to that in a bit), even adding patterned color shifting and reactive lighting. The EVGA Z15 feels built with convenience in mind. The wrist rest that it comes with is magnetic, so it’s not sliding away from the keyboard with every keypress. It has onboard dedicated media keys and a volume scroll wheel. No more closing Warzone to change Spotify songs. And if you, like me, get killed from hitting the “Windows” key every other game, you can turn on gaming mode with a quick FN+G to disable it and save a life. I got to work with the clicky version of the Z15, which means that at its actuation point, or where the keypress registers for the computer, there’s an audible “click.” That actuation point sits at 1.1mm of the total 3.5mm travel distance and requires 50g of force, enough to not accidentally press a key, but not enough to fight back. These clicky-style mechanical switches tend to be the preferred style for gamers, as the tactile “click” helps increase response times. I spent most of my time with the keyboard typing at work, where the click is a bit less appreciated by my coworkers, but I still loved it - when you’re typing all day, that satisfying “click” is a nice, constant reminder of progress. The clicky Z15 comes with Kailh Mechanical Speed Bronze Switches, but EVGA also offers a silent linear version of the Z15 with Speed Silver switches. The Speed Silvers offer the same responsiveness and durability (70 million keypresses!), but without that click that’ll annoy your coworkers and housemates. And if your roommates do complain about the clicky Speed Bronze switches, the Z15’s switches are easily swappable for any of Kailh’s other 3pin mechanical switches thanks to the included switch puller and easy swap design. EVGA Z20 Gaming Mechanical Keyboard The EVGA Z20 Gaming Mechanical Keyboard takes everything great about the Z15 and just adds more. The metal plate and media keys are still there, but now so is a USB and headphone pass-through - no more reaching to plug in headphones or flash sticks. Much like the Z15, the Z20 comes in both a clicky and linear variety, but the Z20 ups the switches to LK Light Strike Optical Mechanical Switches. Where traditional mechanical switches use mechanical elements throughout the whole switch, optical-mechanical switches add a sensor to each switch.  While optical switches are still mechanical, and will still provide that same tactile feedback (or silence, depending on your switch type), the optical sensor reduces wear from daily use, increasing their lifespan to a whopping 100 million keypresses. Optical-mechanical switches also decrease reaction time from keypress to response, making every movement feel more instantaneous. Plus, the EVGA Z20’s switches are a bit shallower than the Z15, with a total travel distance of only 3.0mm, though the actuation distance is a bit further, 1.5mm. They’re also lighter, requiring only 40g of force, making it slightly snappier than the Z15. But let’s not bury the lede too much - the big thing the EVGA Z20 brings to the table is the Time-Of-Flight sensor, or ToF sensor. The Z20's ToF sensor is proximity-based and can pull off some pretty neat tricks, like locking your computer when you step away and waking it from sleep when you sit down at your desk. The EVGA Unleash RGB software offers an impressive range of options for the ToF sensor, allowing you to set time and distance requirements so that you don’t accidentally put your computer to sleep when you casually lean back at your desk. And if you really want to make a splash when you return to your desk, you can have it create a cascade of light across the Z20. But the ToF Sensor is far from the only thing the EVGA Z20 adds to the Z15 base. The left side of the keyboard has been extended to make room for five fully programmable dedicated macro keys and a game mode button - no need to hit FN+G, now a single keypress disables the Windows key. These extra buttons bring the Z20’s size up to 5.94”x18.58”x1.48”, adding a fairly noticeable (but worthwhile) inch to the length of the keyboard.  Also in that added inch are light bars on either side of the keyboard. They’re purely aesthetic, but if you’re looking to light up your whole room with your keyboard, the EVGA Z20 is the way to go. Like the rest of the keyboard, the side lightbars are fully RGB and aren’t constrained to a single color - multiple LEDs on each side allow the sides to be pink up top and deep blue on the bottom. The X17 Gaming Mechanical Mouse EVGA’s X17 Gaming Mouse is, arguably, the most unique of their new peripherals. While it might not have a ToF sensor or optical switches, The X17 stands out thanks to a deep slope to the right side of the mouse and a large hump at the back left. This shape creates a natural cradle for your hand, rising to meet your palm and angling your wrist in a way to rest more naturally. And while a claw grip is theoretically doable on the EVGA X17, it’s definitely more comfortable with a palm grip, fully resting your hand on the mouse. Despite the gaming mouse moniker, the EVGA X17 is fairly low-key. It does have by-zone RGB and a slew of programmable buttons, but it keeps a minimal look. It integrates and hides its plethora of macro buttons and tools across the mouse. On top of the conventional left, right, and scroll-wheel click, the X17 has the still-fairly-common dual side buttons, perfect for both gaming and casual use. But hidden in the scroll wheel is tilt scrolling - pushing the scroll wheel to the left or right - and both directions are completely programmable. Tucked above the two side buttons is the gamer-focused “sniper button,” which drops your DPI while it’s being pressed. But, like everything else, it’s rebind-able for daily use or more personalized gaming. If your EVGA X17 gaming mouse is moonlighting as a working mouse, directly under the scroll wheel is a profile selector, offering a hot-swap through up to five programmable profiles. Set up one for Warzone, one for World of Warcraft, and one for Excel spreadsheets, then swap between them with a single press. And don’t worry - there’s a DPI swap button underneath it as well. It’s still a gaming mouse first and foremost, though. The EVGA X17 comes with three discreet sensors, a main Pixart 3389, and two LOD, or lift-off-distance, sensors. The Pixart 3389 is the X17’s main sensor and delivers up to 16,000 DPI, while the LOD sensors disable the Pixart as soon as you lift it up (as little 0.279mm of elevation!) so you don’t miss your shot adjusting your mouse. And while the X17 weighs a fairly standard 103 grams out of the box, if you find yourself lifting it too easily, it comes with five 5 gram weights to add some heft. Of course, it’s not a gaming mouse without RGB and by-zone RGB lights up the scroll wheel, EVGA logo on the palm rest, and the front of the mouse. And, like the Z15 and Z20 keyboard, it’s adjustable with the EVGA Unleash RGB software. The Software: EVGA Unleash RGB If you’re decking your desk out in EVGA keyboards and mice, you won’t have to worry about cluttering your PC desktop as well; the Z15, Z20, and X17 all use the same EVGA Unleash RGB software.  Unleash RBG is minimal and easy to use. All attached peripherals are shown at the top of the program for easy swapping. The majority of the space is filled with easy-to-understand diagrams of your mouse or keyboard, so you know exactly what you’re changing when you make your sniper button open your email instead of DPI Shift. Macros carry over between peripherals, meaning you only need to program a macro once and you can use it on any EVGA keyboard or mouse. And it is easy to use - simply create an empty macro then hit the record button. It’ll pick up every action you make, including mouse clicks and how long you held a key. No more mistimed ult drops when you time every keypress to be perfect! The RGB editor is just as simple to use but also offers some depth. All three peripherals come with several color profiles pre-loaded, but if you want to make your own, you have a swath of options. Not only is it by-key RGB, but also by-key RGB effects, meaning you can set your WASD to flash rainbow colors while the rest of the keyboard maintains a static white hue. Final Word: The EVGA Z15 Mechanical Gaming Keyboard is an easy recommendation, offering an incredibly solid and satisfying standard-issue keyboard. The EVGA Z20 Mechanical Gaming Keyboard is a bit more niche, but if you’re looking for a niche keyboard with neat tricks like a ToF sensor, you can’t go wrong with it. Lastly, the X17 Gaming Mouse is a great mouse for work and play, but I would recommend stopping by a Micro Center store to feel it before you pick it up, just to make sure it fits your grip. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Leave a Comment Rich Text Editor. To edit a paragraph's style, hit tab to get to the paragraph menu. From there you will be able to pick one style. Nothing defaults to paragraph. An inline formatting menu will show up when you select text. Hit tab to get into that menu. Some elements, such as rich link embeds, images, loading indicators, and error messages may get inserted into the editor. You may navigate to these using the arrow keys inside of the editor and delete them with the delete or backspace key. Comment As ... Categories 6.7K All Categories 1K The Blog 36 What's Trending 164 How to & Technical Guides 10 Computer Hardware 119 Software 3 Home Office 6 Networking Audio/Visual 2 Home Automation 15 3D Printers 9 Maker 15 PC Build Guides 81 Reviews & Buying Guides 27 Build Showcase 13 Contests 35 Past Contests 824 The Community 1.7K General Discussion 105 New Members 87 Consumer Tech 27 Prebuilt PCs and Laptops 75 Software 2 Audio/Visual 12 Networking & Security 1 Home Automation 2 Digital Photography 3 Content Creators 21 Hobby Boards & Projects 23 3D Printing 49 Retro Arcade/Gaming 80 All Other Tech 1.2K Store Information and Policy 49 Off Topic 5 Community Ideas & Feedback 111 Your Completed Builds 2.6K Build-Your-Own PC 1.7K Help Choosing Parts 220 Graphics Cards 161 CPUs, Memory, and Motherboards 61 Cases and Power Supplies 19 Air and Liquid Cooling 13 Monitors and Displays 29 Peripherals 9 All Other Parts 21 Featured Categories We love seeing what our customers build Submit photos and a description of your PC to our build showcase Submit Now Looking for a little inspiration? See other custom PC builds and get some ideas for what can be done View Build Showcase View builds by: AMD Processors Intel Processors RTX 3090 RTX 3080 RTX 2080 Ti RTX 2080 Super RTX 2070 Super RTX 2070 RTX 2060 Super Radeon RX 5700XT Radeon RX 5700 Air Cooled Liquid Cooled SAME DAY CUSTOM BUILD SERVICE If You Can Dream it, We Can Build it. Services starting at $149.99 More Details Micro Center Homepage Desktops Laptops Computer Parts Computer Accessories Custom PC Builder Build Showcase Networking Electronics 3D Printing Service, Upgrades & Repairs Laptop Battery Replacement Laptop Screen Repair Virus and Malware Removal Hard Drive Recovery and Backup Apple MacBook Repair Custom Built PCs Schedule an Appointment © Vanilla Foundation Theme 2021 Powered By Vanilla Community Article computer wont post so changed motherboard and CPU and now turns on for 30s and then off and on. — Micro Center Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker {$smarty.capture.menu} Activity Categories Discussions Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker Home › General Discussion computer wont post so changed motherboard and CPU and now turns on for 30s and then off and on. sparkie22 ✭ April 2020 edited May 2020 in General Discussion I built computer with specs below. I turned on the power and nothing happens execept power to fans etc.  550 Watt 80 Plus Bronze ATX Non-Modular Power Supply 1 of (SKU) 402396  512GB SSD 3D NAND M.2 2280 PCIe NVMe 3.0 x4 Internal Solid State Drive 1 of (SKU) 860304  Windows 10 Home 64-bit OEM DVD - English 1 of (SKU) 805424  Ripjaws V 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR4-3200 PC4-25600 CL16 Dual Channel Desktop Memory Kit F4-3200C16D-16GVKB - Black 1 of (SKU) 348201  H510 Tempered Glass ATX Mid-Tower Computer Case - Black 1 of (SKU) 937268  Ryzen 3 3200G Picasso 3.6GHz Quad-Core AM4 Boxed Processor with Wraith Stealth Cooler 1 of (SKU) 951897  B450-Plus Prime AMD AM4 ATX Motherboard 1 of (SKU) 802512  So I returned the motherboard and CPU and replaced with the following:  Ryzen 3 3200G Picasso 3.6GHz Quad-Core AM4 Boxed Processor with Wraith Stealth Cooler 1 of (SKU) 951897  B450M Pro4 AMD AM4 mATX Motherboard 1 of (SKU) 802579  I turn it on and it runs for 30s before turning on and going back on again. I have tried taking out the ram and going to single stick of ram and also moved the m2 SSD to the other slot.  0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Comments TSTonyV admin April 2020 Hello @sparkie22! Welcome to the Community. I closed your other post in PC Builds since you posted this thread here and Troubleshooting is a little more appropriate for your questions.  Did your motherboard box have a label stating it was Ryzen 3000 desktop ready? If not, you may need to update the BIOS on your motherboard. If so, we actually have a guide here that will run you through the troubleshooting steps for a new build that doesn't want to boot: https://www.microcenter.com/tech_center/article/5715/how-to-troubleshoot-a-new-build-that-will-not-post I'd run through that and see if you can get it working.  1 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook sparkie22 ✭ April 2020 Thanks @TSTonyV !Good question! I did go through that guide but didnt think about your suggestion. I might have to just bring it in and have it looked at.  0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook TSTonyV admin April 2020 edited April 2020 Yeah, if you tried everything in the guide I'd say either something's been assembled incorrectly, or there's some type of compatibility/hardware issue.  If the motherboard box doesn't have that Ryzen 3000 ready label, I'm pretty confident you'd just need a BIOS update.  0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook sparkie22 ✭ April 2020 @TSTonyV. I went to ASUS website and looks like it has been validated since the 1201 version which was back in 2017 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook TSTonyV admin April 2020 Hm, I guess the 3200G is really just an updated 2200G, so that makes sense.  It's hard to say exactly what the cause is then. If you have other components you could swap out that's what I'd do, otherwise i would either exchange parts or let our service desk take a look. Just keep in mind if you want the service desk to look at it they will charge for labor.  0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook sparkie22 ✭ April 2020 @TSTonyV Undertand. I will swing by tomorrow and decide what my best option is. Thanks for the help! 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook sparkie22 ✭ April 2020 @TSTonyV. If I exchange parts it probably would be the motherboard and or the CPU. Can I return items like that if they were already installed? 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook TSTonyV admin April 2020 You can return parts even they've been opened, but if you can we'd like you to put them back in the original packaging.  1 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook sparkie22 ✭ May 2020 edited May 2020 @TSTonyV So I returned the motherboard and CPU and replaced with the following:  Ryzen 3 3200G Picasso 3.6GHz Quad-Core AM4 Boxed Processor with Wraith Stealth Cooler 1 of (SKU) 951897  B450M Pro4 AMD AM4 mATX Motherboard 1 of (SKU) 802579  I turn it on and it runs for 30s before turning on and going back on again. I have tried taking out the ram and going to single stick of ram and also moved the m2 SSD to the other slot.  Any other suggestions? Also I put in a new power supply which is the same one that worked on the first computer i built. This is the 2nd computer I built. First one was with a ASUS Z390-A board and intel processor and all the other same components. That one worked right away.  0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook TSTonyV admin May 2020 I think we might be a looking at a potential BIOS issue for that ASrock board. Does the box say it's Ryzen 3000 desktop ready? The 3200G requires at least BIOS version P3.30 to be installed, but if that label is on the box it should be installed already.  0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook sparkie22 ✭ May 2020 edited May 2020 @TSTonyV    It does say that. I tried to make sure it was this time and also when i selected a CPU I went to accessories this time and this board was an option so figured they would work.  Below is the box. I also talked to someone in line and they said go to pcpartspicker.com and select stuff there. They did give this warning. I also found this link: https://www.amd.com/en/support/kb/faq/pa-100 I sent a request to AMD and see what they say. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook TSMikeW admin May 2020 We'll need some more information to see what the board is doing with no debug LED's. Do you peripherals power up? Also, disconnect the case fans for now. Listen to the CPU fan. Does it spin up and then slow down, or does it stay at a constant speed during that 30 second window? 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook sparkie22 ✭ May 2020 @TSMikeW Good question. So the ASUS board i had in previously LEDs lit up and so did the LAN port LED. I cant remember if the mouse did. I did what you instructed above to ASRock board and I am not getting any LED at the LAN and i plugged in mouse and nothing there. I unplugged the fans. The processor fan seems to say consistent and doesn't ramp up or down. You thinking it is the motherboard? 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook TSMikeW admin May 2020 It's possible. When a system POST's a few things happen in a specific order. CPU initialization is first. At this port the board is initialized and usually the first indication is the thermal fan control. So you'll hear the fan RPM's drop. It's a good way to tell what's going on when you don't have debug LED's or a case speaker. Second is DRAM, and if you pass that stage you go into GPU and initialization of USB/SATA devices, which is where your peripherals would power. So based on what you're getting we look at the motherboard and CPU. You don't have any expansion cards to rule out and it's more likely the CPU being faulty. You have CPU 8 pin connected. I'd say your motherboard is the most likely part at this point. Swapping it out would be my first step. 1 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook sparkie22 ✭ May 2020 @TSMikeW Thanks for the detailed information. I am going to try and pick up an new motherboard tomorrow.  0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook sparkie22 ✭ May 2020 @TSMikeW I replaced the motherboard and the CPU...the same two components before and it is doing the same thing. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook TSTonyV admin May 2020 So it's extremely unlikely to get two bad parts in a row. Not impossible, but very, very rare. It's most likely something else causing the issue at this point.  Do you have another set of RAM you can try, or another PSU? Those are the next two things I'd swap at this point.  1 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook TSMikeW admin May 2020 All we can really say at this point is that the board can't initialize your CPU. The 30 second turn off seems more like a timeout due to lack of input. Which indicates it starts to initialize it then fails with an error code, it's not just stuck on a 00 as an example. We don't have a debug LED to tell us more. I'd try it out of the chassis on a piece of cardboard, The box for the motherboard would work just fine. Don't use the anti-static bag, it's conductive. 1 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook sparkie22 ✭ May 2020 @TSTonyV @TSMikeW I understand all you can do at this point is go by what I am telling you. I haven't swapped RAM out yet. I had a different PSU when this all started. I switched to a different PSU right before i had this run/stop issue. It is the same brand PSU I used on my first build. That one worked right away. I did have a different mobo and an intel processor. I will try and start it up outside the case and might try and get some different RAM otherwise I dont know what to do. Thanks for all the help! 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook TSTonyV admin May 2020 If all else fails, you have the option of letting the service desk at your local store taking a look at it, though there would be diagnostics/labor charges for that. Let us know if you have any other questions! 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook sparkie22 ✭ May 2020 @TSTonyV Thanks! I might have to do that at this point.  0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook sparkie22 ✭ May 2020 @TSTonyV @TSMikeW I replaced the RAM to see if that would work nothing changed...I bought another PSU might try that. Havent tried the board outside the chassis yet. I will try both those otherwise i will just have to bring in. Dont know what else to do at this point haha. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook sparkie22 ✭ May 2020 edited May 2020 @TSTonyV @TSMikeW Update as it is working now I changed out the ram but one of the sticks must be bad...well i hope that is it instead of the motherboard slot. it wasnt working when i placed one stick in but when i put two in it worked. I just tried reinserting the one but computer still is only reading one. I went with crucial ram this time. Do you think the motherboard slot could be damaged? I will take back the memory when i have a chance. I just installed windows and doing the updates for that. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook TSMikeW admin May 2020 It's possible. Make sure your cooler isn't over tightened. We've seen that happen and bow a board, with the result of knocking out a channel. Way to test it use the stick on the far right, that's what's being detected. Boot with the known working stick in each slot. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook sparkie22 ✭ May 2020 @TSMikeW nevermind i played around with inserting the memory and it recognizes it now. Thanks for all the help. Windows is loaded and running 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook TSMikeW admin May 2020 Good to hear. Check your frequency, make sure it's running at the rated frequency and timings. If not, load your XMP  in the BIOS. Let us know you have any other questions. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook sparkie22 ✭ May 2020 ok I have the XMP on auto. So I will look into it. Sounds like i need to modify something. Thanks @TSMikeW 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook sparkie22 ✭ May 2020 i read on it and looks like i will need to change it to profile one. I had it on auto because it said next to it that would go to the frequency optimization. But i will look into it some more. 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Services starting at $149.99 More Details Micro Center Homepage Desktops Laptops Computer Parts Computer Accessories Custom PC Builder Build Showcase Networking Electronics 3D Printing Service, Upgrades & Repairs Laptop Battery Replacement Laptop Screen Repair Virus and Malware Removal Hard Drive Recovery and Backup Apple MacBook Repair Custom Built PCs Schedule an Appointment © Vanilla Foundation Theme 2021 Powered By Vanilla Community Article [CLOSED] Share your PC Building Horror Story and enter to win a 3070 Graphics Card! - Page 3 — Micro Center Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker {$smarty.capture.menu} Activity Categories Discussions Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker Home › Contests › Past Contests [CLOSED] Share your PC Building Horror Story and enter to win a 3070 Graphics Card! «1234567…10» Comments Shatter ✭ January 14 edited January 14      A Half-Life Time Ago............ , I had finally convinced my wife to let me spend $700 of our tax return to purchase PC parts. In my attempts to build the best pc I could, I decided to buy some parts used on Ebay, some new parts from Newegg and a few from local PC conventions. (For those who are too young to remember, Yes they had Computer conventions where vendors competed for you business to sell parts) I was very proud of the rig I had built with my purchases. It was Glorious. I built the PC on a Friday night and spent all day Saturday installing Windows. (Once again for those not old enough, Internet was slow in those days, so downloading windows update took forever) After that I installed my games and was ready to play Half-Life online.      My excitement was overwhelming as I decide before I played to launch my Favorite benchmarking tool from Mad Onion. I started the benchmark and about half way through my wife asked if I needed to shut down my PC because a Thunderstorm was coming. I had never had any issue with weather, so decide to continue on. Within a few minutes of that conversation the power surged and went out along with my new gaiming PC. It never saw life again. A lightning strike close to the house took out a Transformer which surged to my house. No surge protector meant my PC got fried. It took out the PS, MB, and the Nic as well as my Monitor.        I use a surge protectors on everything since that day.  And Yes my wife has used this as one of her many,  "I told you so"  examples since that day.        0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Nick_Burns ✭ January 14 The best horror story when building a computer comes from when I was about 10 back in 1999.  A computer I helped my dad build stopped booting after a RAM upgrade.  we tried to swap back to the original RAM but it would not boot.  Upon further inspection we realized the RAM that was ordered was HP only RAM and the notch didn't quite line up like normal DDR2.  during installation the RAM damaged the slot on the mother board and it had to be replaced.  That lesson stuck with me my whole life.  On a scarier note though it was nothing compared to what happened to about 5 machines while I was in Iraq.  I worked with another Marine that thought if at first you don't succeed try and try again. Back in 2007 I was deployed to Iraq.  We kept having issues with Machines that my fellow Marine was trying to set up.  They all kept coming into the shop with bad power supplies.  It took me about 6 hours to realize that when he was plugging in the machines he was not switching the power supplies from 110 to 220 in the back of the power supplies and he was letting the magic smoke out of the power supplies.  We had to RMA about 5 computers and wait for replacements from state side.  Luckily I brought a few spares.   0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Jtomtb Fredericksburg, VA ✭ January 14 I built my first PC 2 years go and it turned into a major hobby of mine. Pre-COVID, I had gotten into purchasing used hardware for good deals and creating budget builds to sell and make a few bucks....more so out of the craving to build than the desire to make money. I had just completed my third flip PC and was showing it to a buddy over beers, extremely proud of how cheap I had built it for and how awesome the RGB looked. I awkwardly leaned over the top of the PC to flip the PSU power switch, and my freshly opened beer decided to cartwheel out of my left hand, landing perfectly upright on the mouth of the bottle like some sort of Internet bottle flip challenge. IPA proceeded to flood the interior of the Corsair Carbide case, drenching everything inside. I looked at my buddy and said "welp...guess I need to clean this thing". He looked at me and said "yeah man...better HOP to it". He laughed. I laughed. The PC cried. Fun times. It took a week of scrubbing and a whole bottle of alcohol before I finally trusted that it was clean enough to attempt a boot. She booted just fine on the first try! I didn't feel right selling it after what happened so now it functions as a HTPC in my basement. When it warms up, it emits the slight scent of skunked beer. It makes for a great story when asked "dude, what is that smell?". 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook MaaliMachine ✭ January 14 I decided my first build would be a no compromise system with the latest and best cpu and gpu. I picked fall of 2020 to do this. If you've tried to buy computer parts in the last few months I don't have to say any more.  0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook alisalim ✭ January 14 My story begins as I decided to switch from my gaming laptop to a pc. It was my first pc and I was so excited about it, I started ordering the parts last December and as I got all of the parts I called a friend of mine, and we started to put everything together. It came our really beautiful. I had set a budget for it but I forgot to add the monitor to the build, I obviously spent the entire budget on pc parts, so I had to buy a used monitor. I went up on offer up and surprisingly I found me a new lg 34' ips monitor, it was spectacular and for half the price of a new one. So it was a fantastic deal. I took it and I want home, when I was moving the box to put it on the table so I can take the tape off I accidentally pumped the box to the table, I didn't think much of it at the time, the monitor looked amazing and beautiful, but when I turned it on the was the bummer. The screen had a crack on the side. The crack had me thinking my entire lifestyle lol. It totally ruined my mood for days, then I got over it and now I'm sort of used to it I guess.  0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Hanval ✭ January 14 About 4-5 years ago I was working as an I.T at a mortgage company and decided to go on vacation. The computers we had to run our software and multiple screens were horrible, the boutique company who sold my boss the computers before I was hired screwed him over. They would overheat, underperform , the PSU would die randomly, and I would be to blame since I couldn't fix dead hardware. Well I had ordered new heatsinks for all our PC's about 30+ of them since the one that was on the PC's was a low form factor heatsink with a 90mm fan for a FX-8350 in a case with no airflow and for some reason our offices even though they seemed clean the computers would act like vacuum cleaners as I would need to dust them almost every week, no exaggeration... Well when I got back from my week long vacation, our coolers had arrived. I went to my office to get started on the project. Well when I walked into the room all, ALL of the computers in our office was in MY OFFICE. Not only that they were OPENED, with NO CPU. As confused as I was since I was not messaged about what I was looking at I started looking around and in one huge box were all, ALL of the CPU's with the Coolers attached to it by the thermal paste. When I looked at the first one what I had feared the most had happened, the pins were bent, ripped out, or broken... All of them were dead. I stood there with a hand over my mouth just running scenarios in my mind as to what the heck I was looking at. Suddenly my boss walks by and sees my door open and just peaks in and says "Hey my kid helped you out by taking out the coolers from the computer so you can just install the new ones today as I need them all ready by tomorrow" then gives me a thumbs up and keeps walking to the kitchen for some coffee. At that moment I didn't know if either to just quit on the spot or attempt to salvage the CPU's with bent tips and get started. I walked out of the office and politely informed my boss of how all of them were now trash and we either had two choices, buy 30+ FX8350 to keep using the computers in the room or to allow me to request new computers to fix the issues that were slowing us down and causing me to waste my time in these repairs. Well 30+ new and used FX8350's later I got all of our PC's working with new coolers and placed my two weeks after I finished putting together the last computer. Till this day I think this kid watched a video on how to install a CPU cooler and freaked out once he saw the CPU stuck on the cooler and decided to tell his dad that he helped me get the ball rolling. Working there was a nightmare every day. But it helped build my work history so I guess it was worth it the end lol. This is my work PC horror story.  My Home gaming PC one is truly freaky. I had been upgrading my Graphics Card through the years from a GTX 560 to a GTX 970 and into what I'm currently using which is a RTX 2060 Super. Well the rest of my PC hardware was a bit old when this issue happed I was running an i7-2600 with two different types of ram from corsair on an Asus P8P67 Deluxe motherboard. Everything was running well and my 9 year old computer was still running games ok but the bottleneck of the old hardware was super obvious now and I had been thinking of upgrading. Well the day AFTER I decided to look into parts and such, my computer suddenly goes crazy, it freezes and sometimes just doesn't boot. I started troubleshooting and it got to the point where I had 3 systems in my home from my friends swapping out parts figuring out why my PC does not want to work. After many tests we came to the conclusion my graphics card would some how do something to windows files were after trying to boot just ONCE with the 2060 Super FE/Reference card in ANY system regardless of hardware, would destroy windows to the point we had to install the OS fresh into the systems and try it again. The card was still under warranty so I contacted NVIDIA and sent them more proof than possibly they ever needed that this Card was a serial PC killer and had it RMA. The new card works fine, and since then I have recently upgraded my pc as of about a month ago into a i7-9700k with 16G of ram by Crucial in a MSI Z390-A Pro all thanks to Microcenter. And that is the story of my Graphics Card the PC Serial Killer.  0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Zidia ✭ January 14 My horror story is simply this, I have a brand new computer I just built.  Best cpu, motherboard, memory and case I could get locally at Microcenter.  The horror is utterly no gpus to be had, none.  I now have this screaming super machine up and running on a GeForce 550 ti that I found in a pile of junk in my basement.... 2 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook AlexS admin January 14 Zidia said: My horror story is simply this, I have a brand new computer I just built.  Best cpu, motherboard, memory and case I could get locally at Microcenter.  The horror is utterly no gpus to be had, none.  I now have this screaming super machine up and running on a GeForce 550 ti that I found in a pile of junk in my basement.... 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook kngspace ✭ January 14 edited January 14 Not sure if this is exactly the same. But I learned the Lenovo t420 Laptops could be upgraded by flashing the bios to Coreboot and then you could run an Intel extreme cpu I7 3920xm, and then buy a display lvds adapter guy, to add a 1080p panel in place of the original. Pretty awesome setup for a used $50 dollar ebay buy, I thought.    Then after several busted motherboards later, from burning up the lcd lvds diode I finally gave up. But I do still have several t420 laptop motherboards with vga out only, and the coreboot. bios.  One I hooked up bare and used it to run [email protected], at least it could do something. And I can now flash a bios pretty confidently with a CH341a too.  0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook potatohead ✭ January 14 Not nearly as grand as the other stories, but this was terrifying nonetheless. I was carrying a Lian Li O11 XL case up the stairs when my cat decided it'd be the perfect time to walk in between my legs... I ended up tripping and dropping the case down an entire flight of stairs. Though, by some miracle of God, all the glass stayed intact despite the box looking like it had been delivered by Ace Ventura himself! If anyone's wondering, my cat was fine although I nearly had a heart attack because of him :P 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook kopas ✭ January 14 In the early 2000s... CPU retention mechanisms weren't nearly as reliable as they are today. I had just put the finishing touches on a Pentium 4 build. Perched atop my CPU was a massive hunk of copper, held in place by metal clips and a dainty bit of plastic on either side of the socket. As Windows was installing away, my attention was now on cleaning up the mess I hade made to the dining room and surrounding area. BAM! Thudda thudda thudda... ka-CHONK! I looked up to see my mid-tower case leaning slightly to one side and righting itself back. The monitor then went dark and small puff of smoke wisped out from the power supply. Upon further investigation, the plastic bits on the CPU socket had broken. The heatsink, now free of it's restraints, saw fit to lay waste to the internals of my brand new PC. I ended up having to RMA everything except the optical drive. (Remember those?) 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Oblivious_Earth ✭ January 14 A couple of years ago I was building a new PC for my parents. I was using the Cryorig Taku case to give their PC desk a cleaner look. I got it booted and everything working, the last thing to was stick in their old SSD so I could copy any last set of personal files over to their new PC.  Alas I couldn't find a sata power cable with the right length and angle from the modular PSU I was using to reach to where I needed to place the SSD. Fortunately the old PSU had a sata power cable that fit the new PSU and would reach long enough. So I plug it in and the PC doesn't detect the old SSD. Weird, let me try plugging it back in to the old PC, also not detected! That was the day I learnt that the PSU end of power cables are not standardized and I likely shorted something inside the SSD and it remains a paperweight to this day. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook nworbcire ✭ January 14 edited January 14 Decided to build my first computer maybe 5-6 years ago, no experience other than online research/tutorials. I get all the parts and start assembling slowly, carefully, making sure not to discharge static electricity, keep uninstalled parts on their anti-static packaging, using "operation" style care moving my fingers/screwdriver/components. Everything went together quickly and was simple and intuitive like legos, or that box you play with as a kid where you push shapes through corresponding shaped holes. The only thing I needed instruction on was how to set up the jumpers for the front panel connectors on the case to the mobo, and I had to take the mobo back out after mounting because there wasn't room enough in the case to manipulate certains cables I hadn't yet attached. Finally I finish. No static discharge. No spills/drops. No kids around to throw a nerf football at the open case. Seems like it was easier than I thought! Almost too easy. I go to power on my brand new comp (i5-4690k, gtx 960, 8gb ram, 250 ssd, 2 tb hd, things that at the time were a step above what i was used to which set the bar for my excitement) she beeps once and starts to whir as the cooling fans power on, my graphics card lights up, I wait for the screen so I can start loading games/updates but nothing happens..... I double check all the cables are tight. I double check the gpu/ram/monitor on a separate comp. All are verified good and working. I worry now that I got in too deep on my own. Did I just spend 1k on a machine that I can't make work? What an idiot I was for thinking it was going well. I take everything apart and put it back together again. Beep, whir, lights, nothing. I try what I think is everything I could possibly try. Beep, whir, lights, nothing. I curse the gods. Beep, whir, lights, nothing. After torturing myself in this fashion for several hours I come to find that my stupidity was even greater than I could have imagined and I was simply plugging the monitor into the mobo and not the gpu. I had done everything else perfectly. Twice. TL;DR spent an afternoon rebuilding a computer that was functioning fine because I plugged the monitor into the mobo and not the gpu.... 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook TheKeybinder ✭ January 14 It was my first build ever of a pc. I had a fairly large budget and knew what I was doing. Of course, the first thing I should have installed was my CPU. But, even though I wasn't going to install It I wanted to look at my graphics card. It was an ASUS GeForce GTX 1650. When I looked at it it seemed fine. When I got to open the CPU I was very excited. The CPU was a Ryzen 9 5900X. I don't know why, but the packaging was tough to open. When I finally got the cover off, the CPU landed pins first on the hard floor. When I picked it up every single one of the pins was flattened. I ended up getting a replacement. When I got the replacement I installed everything and it didn't post. Turns out the metal on the insert port for the graphics card was just a bunch of plastic painted gold. Then I got a different graphics card and IT STILL DIDNT POST. To this day I have no idea what happened. I ended up buying a rebuild from Alienware. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Faux ✭ January 14 Long time ago, a friend was getting ready to upgrade the system I'd built him previously to a new version of Windows which promised better video graphics. But the motherboard chipset didn't support it without a BIOS upgrade, so I grabbed it online and went to help out. It was accepted without any problem ("Choose file, upload, install, success!") until I rebooted and got a black screen. Nada. Contacted the manufacturer only to find out that another (Asian) company had a motherboard with the same name and I'd gotten their BIOS upgrade instead. No way to uninstall; bricked. I haven't even seen their brand on the market in years now... So drove back home (lived in another state about 45 minute drive each way). Grabbed a compatible motherboard out of a spare system, drove back down, installed it, and ended up spending the night, it was so late (I think it was 2am when all was stable and running). That was around 1999. I have not done BIOS upgrades since... if it's not broke, don't fix it. If it's broke, replace it. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Incred ✭ January 15 So, back in the early 2000s I almost summoned Raiden and burned down the house. Let me explain. I had just gone through the journey of buying all the components needed to build a new gaming PC. I was still pretty new to the whole thing, but this wasn't my first build. The power of naïve confidence allowed me to rush the build together in no time, and I was pretty proud of myself. I simply had to power it up and behold the results. With the PC case laying on its side, I gave it a go.   The motherboard lights twinkled with life and the fans whirled for about half a second and for the span of a heart beat, I thought I had been successful. Then, the system fell dark. Strange. What's going on? I hit the power switch again and got the exact same results. A flicker of life, then nothing. I peered into the case and carefully checked every connection. I tried removing a stick of RAM. Nothing. Trying older RAM. Nothing. Same with the GPU. Same with just about every component. Same results. Nothing.   Why does it power up for only half a second and then die when I hit the power button? After all the trouble of swapping and reseating components, I was perplexed. I don't know what possessed me, but in the name of insanity I decided to flip the switch one more time. This time, the motherboard was not having it.  A piercing arc of light flashed from my motherboard and nearly reached the ceiling with a loud snap. This brief burst of angry electrons was short-lived, but I remember it vividly. It sparked upward from the motherboard and came crashing down against it. The event left in its wake a burning smell and a small puff of ominous smoke. That board was dead. Mercifully, my house was spared.     In the aftermath of depressing disassembly, I found the problem - one that I would have found if I had just been more careful and less rushed. I never put standoffs underneath the motherboard. That's right, it was sitting directly on a metal chassis and it shorted. If there was anything to be gained from that day, it was that I learned to prepare myself for a long building session. No hurrying, no skipped steps. Just do it right. I've never had such a problem again, but to this day I put the standoffs in FIRST.   You may now laugh at my bumbling youth. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Phork ✭ January 15 Back in the early 1990's I was just getting into computers.  I had an old IBM 13mhz 386 and an IBM 20Mhz 386 which I installed a math co processor in myself!  Those were my entrance into the PC world.  I browsed local shops for parts which we had 2.  The guy had a used motherboard with memory and a bad "processor" in it.  So I bought that for $40!!!  I remember the day I bought it.  The other shop had a 486DX2 50mhz!  I was stoked!  I had in hand a paradise 2mb video card and I was ready for that 3d epicness.  I get home, slam everything together.   Turned it on and it ran for about 20 seconds before I had one of the most odd smells I've ever witnessed enter my nose.  Most of the younger crowd will never know about the Socket 7 and earlier era.  Putting a CPU into your socket wasn't the only necessary steps you needed to take.  On the motherboard I had; it had 7 "dip switches" that needed to be selected correctly for the processor you're using.  Well..  I just so happened to tell it that I was using a 100mhz chip.  At the time, I'm not sure if it was more voltage or just the speed that killed that processor.  I can tell you this however, that smell is something you'll never forget.  I learned that making sure to read the manual has stayed in my PC building methods since.  I ended up picking up a motherboard with a Pentium 100mhz in it 2 weeks later and that's where my real "gaming" builds started.  From there I went from being super scared of processors and setups to overclocking a Pentium 3 450Mhz at 633Mhz for years, to an Athlon XP 1700+ at ALMOST 2Ghz to my previous 6700k which daily ran 4.8Ghz for years.  Moral of the story, always double check your parts are compatible and if they need setup in a certain way before turning on.  Could be something stupid; could be something expensive..  Taking an extra 2 seconds to double check things can save you a ton of money later on. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Jaycat ✭ January 15 I'm a beginner PC Builder and I'm almost celebrating my 1 year anniversary as a builder. My first build went perfectly well even though I had no idea where everything needed to go. I have a experienced lot of wild journeys not even on PC on consoles as well. I had a decent system 2700x with a 1660 super pretty good for what I was doing. My case EHHH wasn't the best Thermaltake Level 20 MT but I learned my lesson Any who, one year past and over that time bent some pens on the CPU when I installed a new cooler got that figured out. Where it gets interesting is this past month I cleaned my pc and everything boots up and at the time there was a new GPU Driver for my pc I performed a clean install and my screen went into a black screen and never came on. I went into full panic mode and I restarted my PC nothing; took out my Ram and Graphics Card and CPU nothing. I inspected my motherboard and didn't notice physicals damage so I was lost. Went to my local Microcenter to see if they could try, they tried everything and nothing even the PSU so on that day my Motherboard was sent to afterlife and to this day I have no idea what the problem is .I still believe that it can be fixed but I don't know what or where the issue is. I'm still scared that the new Build I made would do the same luckly I managed to get Lian Li lancool 2 mesh and a new motherboard and cpu but my wallet didn't like it.  0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook fools33 ✭ January 15 My horror story is an everyday affair right now, I'm trying to build my first gaming PC and have almost everything but a GPU is that big part that is currently missing. The main part of my horror story is I am currently on my second gaming laptop which is not even 1 year old yet and already dying, the first ROG laptop had the keyboard completely die on me and would need a motherboard along with the keyboard so I took advantage of the warranty and paid an extra 400-500 for my current ROG laptop... Was more convenient traveling (by car) from South Eastern US to Toronto all the time to have the laptop over a PC. Now my less than a year old laptop is having issues loading programs, communicating with the hard drive and is constantly not responding. I need to get this pc built and ditch the laptop before it completely breaks down. I'm pretty much stuck unable to play games for more than 20 min at a time. Would be awesome to win but at this point I would settle for being able to buy at retail prices instead of resell prices.  0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Arnavsareen ✭ January 15 edited January 15 Oh, you want a horror story? Imagine being totally new to the PC world. I could barley tell RAM apart from an SSD and yes, I decided I wanted my own gaming PC. I researched for a few hours, deciding on a perfect setup. Of course it would per perfect if the MOBO supported an intel CPU. I didn't find this out till it had came in the mail. Of course, me being the cocky guy I am, I decided to make it a challenge for myself and not watch any videos on how to assemble and set it up during the build. When I popped the CPU in the MOBO, I quickly realized my mistake. I looked at the CPU for any bends in the pins. To my great sadness, yes I bent a couple pins. The Amazon team wouldn't refund me a broken product, so I was forced out another $300 to but a new CPU and replace the MOBO. The rest of the build went "smoothly" (I didn't break anything surprisingly.) But of course, this was not the end. The PC powered on to my great surprise, and In the coming days, everything seemed fine. All in till, my GPU started majorly sagging. Me not knowing of GPU supports, I just ignored it and thought of it as normal. Also, for some reason, I wasn't reaching the advertised FPS on games. All I could wonder was why. I decided to buy a new GPU and return the old one, but of course, the GPU actually gained quite a lot of damage from sag. I had to buy a completely new one and soon realized that the whole time I used PCI3 on a PCI4 card. (Oh and the ram was in the wrong place SMH) 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Zhalo2722 ✭ January 15 For a good while I was thinking wether I should build myself a gaming pc or not. What finally got me to build one was when Henry Cavill posted a video of himself building a gaming pc on his Instagram. It looked so nice I just had to build one. I started doing research on the parts I needed and that’s when I learned about microcenter and I fell in love so fast. I went down to micro center and spent about half my day enjoying everything the store had to offer and buying all the parts I needed. Soon after I went home and started up the YouTube videos to start the build. After a long and slow process I was finally done and all I had to do was install windows and that’s where it went down hill. You see my room wasn’t big enough to build the computer so I built it in the living room so all I had to do was carry it to my room and plug it in. I started carrying it to my room until suddenly I trip over something and drop the whole rig shattering the glass and cutting myself in the process. I look back to see what I tripped on and saw the evil eyes of my dog’s duck toy looking at me. At least I learned one thing that day Always buy warranty. . 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Kade7596 Ohio ✭ January 15 edited January 15 Some definite "first-world"-type problems. Nothing major, just... a little embarrassing and frustrating... The only thing to go wrong during my most recent build... and this is the first time this has ever happened, I swear!... is that I forgot to remove the little cellophane sticker/cover from the 'coldplate' on the AIO and smeared Arctic MX-4 all over the place. Had to clean it up and re-apply. I think I was red-faced the entire time even though literally nobody was around to see it. lol The second thing to go wrong was one of the AIO fans chirps VERY audibly and MSI has yet to reply to my RMA request... 🙄 ...so I bought two Silverstone ARGB fans that got good reviews... and one of them has a slightly more reddish hue. I bought two. I have no idea which one has the problem, and so no idea which one to send back. 🙄 The fan in the SFX EVGA power supply is usually silent, because it's usually not spinning... but when it kicks on, it spins up to what seems like at least 1400RPM and vibrates the whole chassis in an otherwise now silent-at-idle build. Wonderful. 🙄 The last nuisance affects us all... there are no GPU's. Winning a 3070 would be nice... otherwise, I think I'm going to be using my previous build's GTX 1070 from 2016 for a LONG time. Maybe even until my next PC is built. Not sure yet. It's fine for now, though. I guess. Sigh. 🙄 Fortunately I have a lot else to be thankful for and I really am not sweating these things too much. lol 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Kidz PA ✭ January 15 Typically, you imagine horrific, drastic stories when a build goes wrong. You know, broken side panels, leaking coolant, shorts and fires sort of thing. But in reality, those pale in comparison to the worst type of build failure... the elusive instability that is impossible to find and hard to diagnose. I've been though it all, but this is the story of the build that nearly broke me. In middle school I dreamt of a new gaming computer, but my Dad insisted he'd only buy me parts. Being new to this world, I instead completely smashed my piggybank from years of allowances to purchase an Alienware system (the pre-Dell era, with a first-gen blower GPU and flat CRT... the works!). It was heaven, until one day it died. A technician came out under warranty and I watched as he changed out the power supply. And that was it, I was hooked! "I can totally do this!", I said to myself. So down the rabbit hole I went, building computers, modding cases, watercooling, overclocking, and pouring over every new issue of CPU magazine. But all this while, I never built a computer for my father, and he never asked.  Until finally, one day after he had retired, over a decade since I started building, he was due for an upgrade and I offered. With my spare parts, I could easily beat any prebuilt prices and I was determined to give him a bang-for-the-buck rig that showed him what he was missing! I selected parts so carefully, built with extra care, and did 3 phases of stress testing and tweaking to balance performance, thermals, and noise. I cut my own logo in vinyl and adorned the case and box. I was so proud, and wanted to make him proud as well. This is where the disaster strikes. I leave my parents home, the pandemic strikes, and so does failure. The computer has an instability that I missed and reboots randomly, but I can't get back to them as they are older and in quarantine. The guilt swells inside me. I finally got the chance to make my Father a computer... and blew it. He's living with a rig that quits at any given time, be it in the middle of editing family videos or a round of Civ V. I see him log into steam, suddenly leave, then come back on. Another crash. I tried to ask him about it and diagnose from afar, but it was no use. He said it was ok because the new SSD reboots so quickly, but I was not okay in the least. This ate away at me and went on for over 7 months. Finally, I would have a chance to safely visit them over the holidays. I packed a bag full of spare parts and diagnostic tools. I ended up gifting him my PSU and GPU, just in case his were failing. I planned tests and stayed up all night rebuilding this computer. Finally, I found something. Memtest had a single failure after testing into well into the next morning. Finally! I never suspected it as I used this memory in my prior personal build for several years with no problems, but in his computer it was not stable at XMP. How could I have missed this?!?  Exhausted, I regifted my Father a refurbished computer this Christmas. It cost me months of anxiety, my favorite GPU and PSU, an all-nighter over the holidays... but it finally worked without issue. At this very moment, I can see that he's on Steam enjoying a game of Civ. I can't be more thankful for a Father who not only introduced me to computers, but had the patience to support me even when I felt that I let him down. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Yang ✭ January 16 My story was pretty simple. I needed to update the BIOS. While it's updating, my son came into the room and like, "what does this switch do, dad?". I need a new motherboard after that. Can't blame him. He was not old enough.  0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook cartime99 ✭ January 16 so I have 2 the first one actually starts at Micro Center. so it was black Friday(2020) I woke up at 4:00 am to go and get in line to wait for a 3080. when I got there I saw that there were already like 15 people there that had been there since like 10:00 pm the previous day. anyway, I was in line for like 3 hours and that's when I notice the horde the line had started to wrap around the parking lot there were so many people there. at around 8 they started letting people into the store they didn't hand out graphics card waivers like previous days which had me worried id be coming back the next day. I got inside and walk straight to the GPU section. I asked a guy if they happened to have any 3080s in stock I was almost 100% sure that like every other time the answer would be no, it wasn't. he said they had some went got one and I was shocked, I couldn't believe it.  Anyway fast forward to later that day. I got home and immediately moved my pc onto the "operating table". I took out my gtx 1650 put it in its box, then I grabbed the 3080 and admired its brick-like size. I went to put it in and it was like a child putting a cylinder in a triangle hole, it didn't fit. I had been a little worried about this for a while but I never really cared about it too much. it took some geometry skills to do but I decided to move my front aio inside the front panel area. it worked I was just able to fit my GPU with maybe a cm of room between it and the aio fans. I was so releived  some pictures  in the top pic I was pushing the GPU back into the cables. the second 2 are an after then a before. the second story is a bit shorter than the first one and takes place about a month after the first.  basically, I had been trying to oc my "Asus tuf RTX 3080 oc edition" I was trying different software and when I tried afterburner it somehow broke my pc. it would crash and then restart but one time it didn't turn the display back on. I had ended up using intel integrated graphics for like an hour before I noticed a red light on my GPU. I googled it and it came up with stuff about power. I opened my case and just tapped the power cable for the GPU and the light went away and everything went back to normal. I was so stressed for an hour about such a minor problem/fix.  Oh and I just remembered one time I spilled thermal paste on my GPU but that's a story for not at 1:00 am on a work night.  0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Cark ✭ January 16 My dad needed a case for a home server he was setting up so he went out to buy a new one and offered to take my old case since it'd just be in corner all neglected-like. I accepted. At the very start of switching all the components out I had to take a break and go tend to something else and just left it for about an hour. I come back to a normal case, mostly everything's installed, the PSU's already locked in place, everything's dandy and pretty it's all set up and I'm happy. Computer starts black screening under load. GPU's getting a little toasty so I scrounge an extra fan. It keeps black screening. Until it no longer wants to black screen and just artifacts. And now I smell hot thermoplastic. The pcie power cable wasn't seated all the way in the PSU, it over-currented my vega 64 crippling it and fried the connector on my PSU. After Christmas in peak GPU drought. I've yet to score a replacement. Also my case rgb doesn't work now. :V 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook plainviewhawk ✭ January 16 In the summer of 2019, I was convinced by my friends to buy a computer so that I can spend more time with them via games and discord. I personally wasn't a big gamer before this but after I purchased my very first computer, I got addicted to it. We spent countless nights playing until the sun came up just to see our ranks in each game to stay the same. Now that I got my love for my computer out of the way, let me tell you the horror to the ending of my PC.  Around a year ago, my dog was in severe heat so any "living" thing was a playmate for him. The "purring" of the computer from the fans may have been a go sign for him or something because one day I came home to my computer a bit.... wet. Yes. My dog may have had sex with the PC. After that, I couldn't look at my dog nor my broken PC the same way. If someone else wins this prize, congratulations to them, but just know that this new graphic card may erase my trauma from my dog with my computer. Thank you. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Pacman1994 ✭ January 16 I’ll start at the beginning when the Cambridge store still ran B&W cameras (I had a friend in LP there). My first “gaming” PC was before dual core chips came out and I played on AOL dial up. Since then I’ve built probably a dozen systems. My last about five years ago was pieced together at Microcenter and was my happy place. I7 6700k, three Asus 27” monitors and a 980ti, water cooler etc. Fast forward a bit and I get divorced. I lost the PC in the divorce!!! My son was playing on it while I was in a one bedroom dive apartment. My dog Tyson, who I also lost in the divorce, knocked over a drink apparently and fried the cooler and the mobo. Eventually the GPU and PSU went as well. I’m still gaming on a laptop but slowly buying parts for a desktop. Guys prenup your gaming PC! Either way see you soon Cambridge store! 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook aspa_pasta ✭ January 16 My first build was last summer--my girlfriend and I were building a gaming rig together and went to Microcenter to buy all of the parts. We went back home to start the build. First mistake: I forgot to get an SSD, so I ran back out to grab one. We install the SSD, finish building the PC, and try to get it to post. Nothing. We realize that the monitor's HDMI cable is plugged into the wrong port after 20 minutes. Seeing some hope, we plug it into the right spot and try again to post. Nothing. TWO HOURS LATER, we're finally able to start up the PC (I can't even remember what the problem was but it all worked out). Then, fast forward to a week later, and I'm playing Overwatch. Suddenly, the screen freezes and my GF swears she heard a popping sound. Turns out the GPU was completely fried! (we got a replacement to test to see if it was the GPU or motherboard). We were able to return the faulty GPU and got a new one--everything works great now but we were terrified of having ruined our PC for basically the first month of its existence.  0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook SakuraFroggy ✭ January 16 When building my first pc, some of the pins in my cpu were bent (hand me down), but trying to do surgery on a cpu was the scariest thing especially when you're just starting out with pc building lol. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook «1234567…10» This discussion has been closed. 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It's funny how every memory kit I bought, it comes with a badge for advertising. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Comments TSTonyV admin May 2020 edited May 2020 G.Skill has some pretty high quality memory available. Like with any manufacturer there are some kits that aren't "great" per se and others that are, but in general I'd say G.Skill is one of the better RAM manufacturers.  Thankfully RAM is one of those things where it's not hard to find good kits from almost any manufacturer.  1 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook C0v3rt_X ✭ May 2020 Agreed. I am a Corsair, Kingston and Crucial lifelong customer for customer service and warranty. G.Skill was my recent addition and zero issues with compatibility. I am sure they have great support as well. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook TSMichaelB admin May 2020 I've used G Skill for a very long time, back when their heatspreaders were so gaudy and made installing tower coolers an absolute chore. While I've had issues with their... aesthetic decisions, their performance was always a huge factor in my decision. It was not uncommon to buy a cheap DDR3 1333mhz G Skill kit and manually overclock it to 2400mhz with just 1.65V. Now with DDR4, G Skill appears to have some of the best access to Samsung's B Die memory, making them a very sought after brand on the high end. That, and they often have memory overclocking competitions to show off their insanely fast kits. Nowadays I use a Patriot kit myself, mostly because of the aesthetics, but I still have all of my old G Skill kits as backups, even some from my DDR2 days. Despite me abusing my ram with aggressive overclocking, I've never had a single DIMM die on me, so G Skill gets my respect for durability. That, and the tame aesthetics of the Ripjaws V is worthy of some praise in a world dominated by RGB. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook TSMikeW admin May 2020 I'm a fan of G.Skill, currently running Trident Z DDR4-3600 CL16. Never had a problem with their products, but I'm not loyal to any manufacturer for memory. I do respect companies like Corsair for being a premium brand, offering a good product and service. However, with memory, it's always about finding out which models are using the best IC's, then you find the best deal that you can. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook C0v3rt_X ✭ May 2020 Michael and Mike, thank you both for your input. I cannot count how many systems I have built but there was zero complaints with the manufacturers I chosen.  Yeah RGB isn't really my thing but I can always leave it at a static color. To me having too much light can ruin the looks. G.Skill Ripjaws V was used in several systems both Intel and AMD with no issue so they deserve a spot in my brand selections. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook BubbleMax MN ✭ May 2020 From what I've read, from googling and reading up about G. Skill its pretty much a high quality enthusiast level memory. That is pretty optimistic and most definitely fits most of the bells and whistles of a solid third party PC equipment in terms of being both reliably identified by many different Motherboards. To go along with being well balanced in terms of compatibility the G.Skill memory is also pretty good at being reliable/durable in terms of performance and lifespan as hardware. (As a side note I wouldn't say its the overall best but its quality made and reliable two things that might to the right customer justify such purchase.) The only real cons from a customer stand point would be the outrageous RGB with some of G Skills build designs and the price can be a bit high tier if you start looking for ram above 3200 mhz.  0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook C0v3rt_X ✭ May 2020 BubbleMax said: From what I've read, from googling and reading up about G. Skill its pretty much a high quality enthusiast level memory. That is pretty optimistic and most definitely fits most of the bells and whistles of a solid third party PC equipment in terms of being both reliably identified by many different Motherboards. To go along with being well balanced in terms of compatibility the G.Skill memory is also pretty good at being reliable/durable in terms of performance and lifespan as hardware. (As a side note I wouldn't say its the overall best but its quality made and reliable two things that might to the right customer justify such purchase.) The only real cons from a customer stand point would be the outrageous RGB with some of G Skills build designs and the price can be a bit high tier if you start looking for ram above 3200 mhz.  RGB is so overrated man. The only lighting I have in my case now is the motherboard lighting, GPU lighting and a rear 120mm exhaust fan. My system can be a show case since I have a side panel window but I build her to be my workstation and gaming machine. Not too long ago I purchased their Ripjaws V 32GB 3600MHz memory for a great price. I reserved a RTX 2070 Super that I am going to pickup tomorrow as well. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook BubbleMax MN ✭ June 2020 C0v3rt_X said: BubbleMax said: From what I've read, from googling and reading up about G. Skill its pretty much a high quality enthusiast level memory. That is pretty optimistic and most definitely fits most of the bells and whistles of a solid third party PC equipment in terms of being both reliably identified by many different Motherboards. To go along with being well balanced in terms of compatibility the G.Skill memory is also pretty good at being reliable/durable in terms of performance and lifespan as hardware. (As a side note I wouldn't say its the overall best but its quality made and reliable two things that might to the right customer justify such purchase.) The only real cons from a customer stand point would be the outrageous RGB with some of G Skills build designs and the price can be a bit high tier if you start looking for ram above 3200 mhz.  RGB is so overrated man. The only lighting I have in my case now is the motherboard lighting, GPU lighting and a rear 120mm exhaust fan. My system can be a show case since I have a side panel window but I build her to be my workstation and gaming machine. Not too long ago I purchased their Ripjaws V 32GB 3600MHz memory for a great price. I reserved a RTX 2070 Super that I am going to pickup tomorrow as well. Woah no need to attack me over my opinion I never ONCE said you HAVE to get RGB. I also said its "enthusiast" level RAM. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook TSMichaelB admin June 2020 edited June 2020 BubbleMax said: C0v3rt_X said: BubbleMax said: From what I've read, from googling and reading up about G. Skill its pretty much a high quality enthusiast level memory. That is pretty optimistic and most definitely fits most of the bells and whistles of a solid third party PC equipment in terms of being both reliably identified by many different Motherboards. To go along with being well balanced in terms of compatibility the G.Skill memory is also pretty good at being reliable/durable in terms of performance and lifespan as hardware. (As a side note I wouldn't say its the overall best but its quality made and reliable two things that might to the right customer justify such purchase.) The only real cons from a customer stand point would be the outrageous RGB with some of G Skills build designs and the price can be a bit high tier if you start looking for ram above 3200 mhz.  RGB is so overrated man. The only lighting I have in my case now is the motherboard lighting, GPU lighting and a rear 120mm exhaust fan. My system can be a show case since I have a side panel window but I build her to be my workstation and gaming machine. Not too long ago I purchased their Ripjaws V 32GB 3600MHz memory for a great price. I reserved a RTX 2070 Super that I am going to pickup tomorrow as well. Woah no need to attack me over my opinion I never ONCE said you HAVE to get RGB. I also said its "enthusiast" level RAM.  I didn't perceive his response to be an attack, just an expression of his opinion as well. Text can be pretty tricky when conveying tone, but I wouldn't sweat it. You are correct in that RGB is typically seen as synonymous with "enthusiast" or "gamer-grade" components mostly due to recent marketing trends. Most of the older enthusiasts have grown quite tired of the trend, as we miss our dull, "neutral" color tones, but luckily most RGB hardware gives you the option to disable the lighting. When all else fails, there's always a dremel, lol. Its also important to keep in mind that while brand names can be good for judging quality based on the history of their products, it's not always a simple comparison either. While a brand may have an extremely reliable halo/enthusiast tier product, their budget offerings may not be as reliable, or might be poorly reviewed in comparison. When I shop for memory, I pay less attention to brand names and more attention to the quality of the DRAM IC's themselves. Do they have Samsung B-Die, Micron E-Die, Hynix CJR? etc. Afterwards comes aesthetics, then pricing. This order will differ depending on your priorities. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook C0v3rt_X ✭ June 2020 BubbleMax said: C0v3rt_X said: BubbleMax said: From what I've read, from googling and reading up about G. Skill its pretty much a high quality enthusiast level memory. That is pretty optimistic and most definitely fits most of the bells and whistles of a solid third party PC equipment in terms of being both reliably identified by many different Motherboards. To go along with being well balanced in terms of compatibility the G.Skill memory is also pretty good at being reliable/durable in terms of performance and lifespan as hardware. (As a side note I wouldn't say its the overall best but its quality made and reliable two things that might to the right customer justify such purchase.) The only real cons from a customer stand point would be the outrageous RGB with some of G Skills build designs and the price can be a bit high tier if you start looking for ram above 3200 mhz.  RGB is so overrated man. The only lighting I have in my case now is the motherboard lighting, GPU lighting and a rear 120mm exhaust fan. My system can be a show case since I have a side panel window but I build her to be my workstation and gaming machine. Not too long ago I purchased their Ripjaws V 32GB 3600MHz memory for a great price. I reserved a RTX 2070 Super that I am going to pickup tomorrow as well. Woah no need to attack me over my opinion I never ONCE said you HAVE to get RGB. I also said its "enthusiast" level RAM. Not attacking you brother. I speak with a calm level head 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook BubbleMax MN ✭ July 2020 C0v3rt_X said: BubbleMax said: C0v3rt_X said: BubbleMax said: From what I've read, from googling and reading up about G. Skill its pretty much a high quality enthusiast level memory. That is pretty optimistic and most definitely fits most of the bells and whistles of a solid third party PC equipment in terms of being both reliably identified by many different Motherboards. To go along with being well balanced in terms of compatibility the G.Skill memory is also pretty good at being reliable/durable in terms of performance and lifespan as hardware. (As a side note I wouldn't say its the overall best but its quality made and reliable two things that might to the right customer justify such purchase.) The only real cons from a customer stand point would be the outrageous RGB with some of G Skills build designs and the price can be a bit high tier if you start looking for ram above 3200 mhz.  RGB is so overrated man. The only lighting I have in my case now is the motherboard lighting, GPU lighting and a rear 120mm exhaust fan. My system can be a show case since I have a side panel window but I build her to be my workstation and gaming machine. Not too long ago I purchased their Ripjaws V 32GB 3600MHz memory for a great price. I reserved a RTX 2070 Super that I am going to pickup tomorrow as well. Woah no need to attack me over my opinion I never ONCE said you HAVE to get RGB. I also said its "enthusiast" level RAM. Not attacking you brother. I speak with a calm level head Just seemed a bit aggressive with the wording. Man  0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Categories 6.7K All Categories 1K The Blog 36 What's Trending 164 How to & Technical Guides 10 Computer Hardware 119 Software 3 Home Office 6 Networking Audio/Visual 2 Home Automation 15 3D Printers 9 Maker 15 PC Build Guides 81 Reviews & Buying Guides 27 Build Showcase 13 Contests 35 Past Contests 823 The Community 1.7K General Discussion 105 New Members 87 Consumer Tech 27 Prebuilt PCs and Laptops 75 Software 2 Audio/Visual 12 Networking & Security 1 Home Automation 2 Digital Photography 3 Content Creators 21 Hobby Boards & Projects 23 3D Printing 49 Retro Arcade/Gaming 80 All Other Tech 1.2K Store Information and Policy 49 Off Topic 5 Community Ideas & Feedback 111 Your Completed Builds 2.6K Build-Your-Own PC 1.7K Help Choosing Parts 220 Graphics Cards 161 CPUs, Memory, and Motherboards 61 Cases and Power Supplies 19 Air and Liquid Cooling 13 Monitors and Displays 29 Peripherals 9 All Other Parts 21 Featured Categories We love seeing what our customers build Submit photos and a description of your PC to our build showcase Submit Now Looking for a little inspiration? See other custom PC builds and get some ideas for what can be done View Build Showcase View builds by: AMD Processors Intel Processors RTX 3090 RTX 3080 RTX 2080 Ti RTX 2080 Super RTX 2070 Super RTX 2070 RTX 2060 Super Radeon RX 5700XT Radeon RX 5700 Air Cooled Liquid Cooled SAME DAY CUSTOM BUILD SERVICE If You Can Dream it, We Can Build it. Services starting at $149.99 More Details Micro Center Homepage Desktops Laptops Computer Parts Computer Accessories Custom PC Builder Build Showcase Networking Electronics 3D Printing Service, Upgrades & Repairs Laptop Battery Replacement Laptop Screen Repair Virus and Malware Removal Hard Drive Recovery and Backup Apple MacBook Repair Custom Built PCs Schedule an Appointment © Vanilla Foundation Theme 2021 Powered By Vanilla Community Article Micro Center AMD Threadripper 3990X Build Guide — Micro Center Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker {$smarty.capture.menu} Activity Categories Discussions Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker Home › PC Build Guides Micro Center AMD Threadripper 3990X Build Guide ryau ✭✭✭✭✭ February 2020 edited February 2020 in PC Build Guides Micro Center AMD Threadripper 3990X Build Guide This guide will demonstrate the assembly process of the AMD Ryzen Threadripper 3990X display system. Please note: The steps below may depend on component availability and preference/experience of the person performing the assembly. The instructions below are to build a system using the following computer parts: AMD Threadripper 3990X CPU ASUS TRX40 ROG Zenith II Extreme Alpha AMD sTRX4 EATX Motherboard 128 GB G.Skill Trident Z Neo Series RGB (4 x 32GB) DDR4-3200 PC4-25600 CL16 Quad Channel Memory Kit EVGA GeForce RTX 2080 Ti FTW3 Ultra Gaming Triple-Fan 11GB GDDR6 PCIe 3.0 Video Card 2 x Samsung 970 EVO+ 1TB SSD V-NAND M.2 2280 PCIe NVMe 3.0 x4 Lian Li O11 Dynamic XL ROG eATX Mid-Tower Computer Case EVGA SuperNOVA 1600W Watt 80 Plus Titanium ATX Fully Modular Power Supply Load the list of components in our online PC Builder Additional water cooling components are show below. While our build used silver fittings, we have many other colors (black, white, black sparkle, and matte black) in stock so you can tailor the build to your own taste. Bitspower Touchaqua Tarasque 360mm Radiator (Top) Bitspower Leviathan XF360 Triple 360mm Radiator (Bottom) Lian Li O11D Distribution Plate G1 Bitspower Touchaqua Notos RGB 120mm Case Fan (5 pack) Bitspower Touchaqua Notos RGB 120mm Case Fan (Single) EKWB EK-Velocity sTR4 D-RGB CPU Block 3 x Bitspower G 1/4" Male to Male Fitting - Silver 4 x Bitspower G 1/4" 15mm Male to Female Extender - Silver 3 x Bitspower G 1/4" Thread 90° Adapter - Silver 24 x Bitspower G 1/4" Enhanced Straight Compression Fitting - Silver 4 x Bitspower G 1/4" 25mm Male to Female Extender - Silver 8 x Bitspower 90-Degree With Dual Inner G1/4" Extender - Silver Shining Bitspower X-Cross Fitting - Silver Bitspower G 1/4" Mini-Valve Straight - Silver Thermaltake V-Tubler PETG 1/2" (13 mm) x 5/8" (16 mm) Rigid Tubing 1000 mm - Clear If you want to use different fittings, tubing and add components such as a GPU water block, the following instructions may not reflect your modifications. All assembly and modification is done at your own risk. Contents Preparations & Tools (Step 1) Motherboard component installation (Step 2) Top & Side Panel Removal (Step 3) Internal HDD Bracket/Accessory Package (Step 4) Motherboard Installation (Step 5) Chassis Cable Shroud Removal (Step 6) Preliminary PSU Cable Routing (Step 7) Rear SSD Panel Removal (Step 8) Distro-Plate Installation (Step 9) RGB & Fan Controllers (Step 10) PSU Installation (Step 11) Lower Radiator & Fan Installation (Step 12) Upper Radiator & Fan Installation (Step 13) GPU Installation (Step 14) PSU Cable Management (Step 15) Distro-Plate Fitting Installation (Step 16) Tube Cutting & Loop Assembly (Step 16A) Optional Drain Valve (Step 17) Leak Test (Step 18) Filling the Loop (Step 19) Reassemble Panels & Install OS 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Comments ryau ✭✭✭✭✭ February 2020 Preparation and Recommended Tools: Large Anti-static work environment EK Leak Tester Screwdriver Set Water Coolant Fill Bottle Tape Measure/Ruler ASUS Motherboard Manual (pdf) Lian Li Chassis PDF Manual can be found at the bottom of their product page.  Saw/dremel for cutting PETG tubing PrimoChill PETG / Acrylic Reamer/Deburring Tool Eclipse Enterprise ESD Strap W/Velcro Adjustable Strap Safety glasses Grip Microfiber Cleaning Cloths 12" x 12" - 12 pack Tweezers ;-) Bawls Guarana - Cherry 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook ryau ✭✭✭✭✭ February 2020 Step 1: Motherboard Component Installation Prepare the motherboard outside of the chassis by installing the DDR4 memory, the CPU, and both M.2 SSD’s in the motherboard. Install the CPU water block, using an X pattern and 4 dots for thermal paste. Refer to section 2-1 of the motherboard manual for detailed step by step instructions on this process. NOTE: Due to clearance issues with the PETG tubing, do not use the DIMM.2 card for the SSD’s. Install the SSD’s underneath the motherboard “armor”. This requires loosening 4 captive screws and removing the armor to reveal the M.2 slots. Refer to section 2-11 of the manual for more detailed instructions. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook ryau ✭✭✭✭✭ February 2020 Step 2: Remove the top panel by loosening the captive thumb screws and pressing down on the rear latch on the back of the chassis. Afterwards, slide each side panel upwards to remove them from the chassis. Store in a safe location until the assembly is finished.  Please refer to the attached manual for more detailed instructions. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook ryau ✭✭✭✭✭ February 2020 Step 3: Loosen the captive screw on the plate covering the top internal hard drive bay. Next, loosen the screw on the bracket below the top bay and slide it towards the left. Finally, remove the hard drive rail to access the chassis accessory package. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook ryau ✭✭✭✭✭ February 2020 Step 4: Install the motherboard into the chassis using the screws provided in the accessory package. The standoffs should be preinstalled with no modifications required to install the board. Step 5: Remove the rear chassis cable shroud by removing two screws and lifting the bracket outwards. Refer to page 8 of the Lian Li manual for more detailed instructions. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook ryau ✭✭✭✭✭ February 2020 Step 6: Before installing the power supply, grab the cables you will need and start routing them to the necessary spots on the board throughout the chassis. You will need two 8-pin EPS cables for the CPU 12V ports, the 24 pin ATX cable for the motherboard main power, and three 8-pin VGA cables. Two for the graphics card, one for the CPU 12V auxiliary power. Two of the VGA cables should be routed through the bottom of the chassis to be positioned underneath the GPU for cleaner cable management. Route the front IO cables through the bottom rubber grommet and attach them to the motherboard. Refer to page 8 of the Lian Li manual for additional details on cable management. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook ryau ✭✭✭✭✭ February 2020 Step 7: Remove the top 3 SSD mounting panels on the left side of the chassis behind the motherboard tray. Leave the bottom panel connected as it will help hide cables from the front IO and distro-plate. Refer to page 7 of the Lian Li manual for additional details.  0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook ryau ✭✭✭✭✭ February 2020 Step 8: Mount the EKWB G1 Distro-Plate to the SSD mount location near the front IO. Be sure to lower the distro-plate until the pump is almost touching the bottom SSD mounting bracket. This will help line up the ports on the distro-plate with the ports on the CPU block and radiators. Fasten the distro-plate to the chassis using 8 screws included with the distro-plate. Attach the pump cable to the W_PUMP header on the board near the 24 pin ATX connector. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook ryau ✭✭✭✭✭ February 2020 Step 9: Install the fan & RGB controllers included with the Bitspower fans. Install the fan controller on the top HDD cage and the RGB controller on the bottom HDD cage. Install the 5V ARGB header to the bottom part of the motherboard where the GPU cables were routed previously. Install the fan controller cable into CPU_FAN1. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook ryau ✭✭✭✭✭ February 2020 Step 10: Install the PSU into the chassis. It’s a tight fit, however you do not need to remove the front panel LED controller. Simply angle the PSU in and side it towards the back. Secure with 4 screws included with the chassis accessory package. Leave the cables unplugged from the PSU until a later step, as it will help with routing cables later. Step 11: NOTE: Before proceeding, flush the radiator with warm water until flakes/debris are no longer present. Remove the bottom radiator mount from the chassis by removing 2 screws and depressing the clips at the bottom. Install the thicker radiator to this bracket using the smaller screws provided with the radiator. Make sure the inlet/outlet ports are towards the distro-plate installed in the chassis.  Make sure the radiator is slid to the right side of the bracket to line up with the ports on the right side of the distro-plate. Attach your fans to the radiator in an intake position (Bitspower logo facing down towards the radiator, voltage specifications facing up). Route the cables through the rubber grommet that your VGA cables are routed through, then reattach the bracket using the two screws and clips. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook ryau ✭✭✭✭✭ February 2020 Step 12: NOTE: Before proceeding, flush the radiator with warm water until flakes/debris are no longer present. Attach 3 of the Bitspower ARGB fans to the radiator in an exhaust configuration (Bitspower logo visible inside of the chassis, fan voltage specifications mounted towards the top radiator). Be sure to mount the fans so that the cables can be easily routed through the rubber grommet on the chassis. Make sure the thinner radiator inlet/outlet ports are mounted closest to the distro-plate installed in the chassis. Slide the radiator as far forward as it will go and attach to the chassis using the radiator screws supplied with the thinner radiator. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook ryau ✭✭✭✭✭ February 2020 Step 13: Remove the PCIe metal brackets and install the RTX 2080 Ti into the motherboard. Connect the cables that were routed previously to the GPU and make sure they are snug to keep them from touching the lower radiator fan. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook ryau ✭✭✭✭✭ February 2020 Step 14: Finish plugging all the cables into the PSU that were left hanging earlier. Use the Velcro cable ties to secure the cables to one another so that they are neatly confined within the space behind the PSU cable shroud that was removed in Step 5. After securing the cables in a bunch, attach the PSU cable shroud using 4 screws. Note: You may need to slide the PSU shroud into place due to lack of clearance. It will fit, just slide it in from the left to the right. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook ryau ✭✭✭✭✭ February 2020 Step 15: Prepare your fittings. Attach compression fittings to the distro-plate and lower radiator.  0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook ryau ✭✭✭✭✭ February 2020 Step 16: Cut PETG tubing in the following lengths for the respective bends. Keep in mind that you may need slightly more length on the tubing to make up for material lost when deburring: ·         Bend 1: 3 ⅞” – 2 ⅛” – 2” ·         Bend 2: 5 ⅞” – 4 ½” – 2” ·         Bend 3: 6” – 3 ⅛” ·         Bend 4: 5” – 2 ¾” ·         Bend 5: 2 ⅛” ·         Bend 6: 4 ⅜” Those bends will correspond with the image below: Attach the tubes and fittings to their exact locations referenced in the image above. Step 16A (OPTIONAL): Add a drain at the bottom of the distro-plate behind the SSD mounting plate. NOTE: This is very difficult to install due to the close proximity to the pump and requires tightening the fitting into the distro-plate with very little room to move. With that being said, this step is highly recommended to save time when draining & servicing the unit in the future. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook ryau ✭✭✭✭✭ February 2020 Step 17: Leak test the system using the EKWB Leak Test tool. Hand pump to 0.5-0.75 BAR and listen closely for any air leaks. It’s recommended to let the system sit for an hour to make sure it does not leak air over time.   Step 18: Fill the system with coolant using the fill port on the back of the distro-plate. A fill bottle will make this step easier. NOTE: Due to the lower speed of the pump, it is only recommended to use clear coolants such as EK CryoFuel Clear. Opaque fluids may gunk up and impede the flowrate of the pump. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook ryau ✭✭✭✭✭ February 2020 Step 19: Attach the side panels to the system and prepare your Windows 10 installation. The SSD’s will be configured in RAID 0, so you will need to have the RAID driver ready during installation. If you've reached this point, congrats! The system should be complete and ready for use. Micro Center offers custom PC build services from basic to high end system with custom hard tube water cooling. If you want a fully custom, high FPS gaming system, or business system with unique specifications, imagine it online using our PC builder, then stop by one of our stores and talk to one of our associates. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Leave a Comment Rich Text Editor. To edit a paragraph's style, hit tab to get to the paragraph menu. From there you will be able to pick one style. Nothing defaults to paragraph. An inline formatting menu will show up when you select text. Hit tab to get into that menu. Some elements, such as rich link embeds, images, loading indicators, and error messages may get inserted into the editor. You may navigate to these using the arrow keys inside of the editor and delete them with the delete or backspace key. Comment As ... Categories 6.7K All Categories 1K The Blog 36 What's Trending 164 How to & Technical Guides 10 Computer Hardware 119 Software 3 Home Office 6 Networking Audio/Visual 2 Home Automation 15 3D Printers 9 Maker 15 PC Build Guides 81 Reviews & Buying Guides 27 Build Showcase 13 Contests 35 Past Contests 824 The Community 1.7K General Discussion 105 New Members 87 Consumer Tech 27 Prebuilt PCs and Laptops 75 Software 2 Audio/Visual 12 Networking & Security 1 Home Automation 2 Digital Photography 3 Content Creators 21 Hobby Boards & Projects 23 3D Printing 49 Retro Arcade/Gaming 80 All Other Tech 1.2K Store Information and Policy 49 Off Topic 5 Community Ideas & Feedback 111 Your Completed Builds 2.6K Build-Your-Own PC 1.7K Help Choosing Parts 220 Graphics Cards 161 CPUs, Memory, and Motherboards 61 Cases and Power Supplies 19 Air and Liquid Cooling 13 Monitors and Displays 29 Peripherals 9 All Other Parts 21 Featured Categories We love seeing what our customers build Submit photos and a description of your PC to our build showcase Submit Now Looking for a little inspiration? See other custom PC builds and get some ideas for what can be done View Build Showcase View builds by: AMD Processors Intel Processors RTX 3090 RTX 3080 RTX 2080 Ti RTX 2080 Super RTX 2070 Super RTX 2070 RTX 2060 Super Radeon RX 5700XT Radeon RX 5700 Air Cooled Liquid Cooled SAME DAY CUSTOM BUILD SERVICE If You Can Dream it, We Can Build it. Services starting at $149.99 More Details Micro Center Homepage Desktops Laptops Computer Parts Computer Accessories Custom PC Builder Build Showcase Networking Electronics 3D Printing Service, Upgrades & Repairs Laptop Battery Replacement Laptop Screen Repair Virus and Malware Removal Hard Drive Recovery and Backup Apple MacBook Repair Custom Built PCs Schedule an Appointment © Vanilla Foundation Theme 2021 Powered By Vanilla Community Article Nanoleaf Shapes Breakdown & Showcase — Micro Center Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker {$smarty.capture.menu} Activity Categories Discussions Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker Home › Reviews & Buying Guides Nanoleaf Shapes Breakdown & Showcase SeanM admin April 9 edited October 22 in Reviews & Buying Guides If you’ve been spending time looking at top-of-the-line gaming rigs or expansive smart-home set-ups, you’ve undoubtedly seen walls covered in colored, light-up shapes. But, you might not be aware of what those are or how easy they are to implement in your own home. So, let us, with the help of some Micro Center fans who submitted their Nanoleaf set-ups, introduce: Nanoleaf Shapes. Instagram: RetroTurboTimmy  What are Nanoleaf Shapes? Nanoleaf Shapes are a lot of things: personal expression, room accents, computer highlights, and more. But mostly, Nanoleaf Shapes is customizable lighting beyond the RGB smart bulb, allowing for any number of combinations of lighting, colors, and design, anywhere you want them to be.  There’s a limit to how much you can do with the average RGB smart bulb. You can set schedules for when they turn on or off, you can have them glow any number of colors, and you can access them anywhere with a cell connection. But once they’re set up, they remain static in their lamp. Nanoleaf Shapes have all the features of the average RGB smart bulb - schedules, colors, remote access - plus complete customizability (and interactivity, which we’ll get to in a bit). Shapes come in three different styles: Hexagons, Triangles, and Mini Triangles. All three styles work with one another, so you can hook up your hexagons to your mini triangles and create something like Josh Beal did below: Facebook: Josh Beal What can Nanoleaf Shapes do? As I hinted at just a paragraph above, there’s a lot that Nanoleaf Shapes can do that the average RGB light bulb can’t do. The most visually striking is per-panel RGB, meaning that you can create a color scheme all your own. Mix purples with pinks and blues and spread them out in a honeycomb pattern, punctuated with mini triangles. Add on a layered dynamic scene so every third Shape slowly shifts colors, and you’ve got something entirely unique to your house. That customizability is far from the only thing Nanoleaf Shapes can do. Sync them up with your sound system, and they’ll react to music in a variety of different ways, depending on which dynamic scene you have on. They’ll pulse with the beat, pop into a shower of color at high points, and quietly shift to the rhythm. If you watch movies or play video games in the same room as your Nanoleaf Shapes, you can connect them to your device through Screen Mirror and have them match the colors of your screen. Make in-game explosions pop off your monitor as Shapes burst into vibrant reds. Expand your movies beyond the limits of your TV and watch the latest blockbuster fill your living room. Nanoleaf Shapes can even be set up to respond to touch, allowing for interactive light displays in your own home. Tap your Shape for a burst of color or a soft hue shift. And if you’re looking for even more interactivity, the Nanoleaf app enables games for your Shapes, including Simon, where you repeat patterns, Memory, where you find matching colors, and Whack-A-Mole, where the goal is to press Shapes as soon as they light up. Facebook - Steven Osborne Is it easy to set up Nanoleaf Shapes? Yes - from hanging the Shapes on your wall to connecting them to your phone, everything about Nanoleaf Shapes has been streamlined for ease of use.  Nanoleaf doesn’t use nails or any other wall-damaging hangars. Instead, Shapes are hung with wall-safe double-sided tape, included with every kit. It’s as simple as applying the tape to your Shape, then pressing it against the wall for thirty seconds. And if you’re looking to connect two Shapes together, it’s as easy as a snap. Pick a side, snap in the connector, then snap in the second shape. And if you decide you want to adjust your setup, Shapes and connectors easily snap apart for reuse! Connecting a new smart device to WiFi can be daunting, but Nanoleaf makes that a breeze as well, thanks to multiple connection methods. Every set comes with a QR pairing code printed in multiple locations, including the instruction manual, the power cord, and the controller. Scanning the QR code will automatically pair your device, so long as your smartphone is connected to your non-5G WiFi. Alternatively, if your smartphone has an NFC reader, just tap your phone to the controller to connect your Shapes set. And, if you don’t want to or can’t scan or tap, you can manually input your set’s code into your device. After that, you’re good to go! Twitter - GianniMenasa How do I control Nanoleaf Shapes? Nanoleaf Shapes can be controlled by any smart home device, such as Amazon Alexa or Apple HomeKit, as well as with the smartphone app. Once your Shapes kit has been connected to your WiFi, use your chosen smart-home app to link it to your smart devices. However, it is worth keeping the Nanoleaf app on your phone. While your smart home devices can be used to turn on your Shapes, change colors, and brighten/dim them, functionality is still a bit more limited than within the Nanoleaf app, which can delve far deeper into the personalization of your Shapes, including scenes and dynamic scenes.  Nanoleaf shapes also feature a controller that can be attached to the Shapes, and serves as a power button, dimmer, scene changer, and activates Rhythm, which allows Nanoleaf to react to music. Facebook - Jenna Washington Win your own Nanoleaf Smarter Kit! Getting excited about Nanoleaf Shapes and want a set for yourself? You’ve come to the right place! We’re giving away one of each of Nanoleaf’s Shapes Smarter Kits. That’s a Hexagon kit, a Triangles kit, and a Mini Triangles kit - and entering is incredibly easy. All you have to do is comment below what you’d like to do with a Nanoleaf Shapes set! Tell us about your dream living room setup, your gaming den, your under-lit media station, and maybe you’ll win a set of Nanoleaf Shapes to make that dream a reality! Nanoleaf-Triangles_Winner-Waiver.docx 1 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook «12345» Comments Codax ✭ April 9 Need more RGB in my life!! 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook cmoreira ✭ April 9 I’d like to hang them behind my monitors, on the wall so I can match them to the LED lights, ultimate gaming den  0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook doctormevans ✭ April 9 edited April 9 I would love a set of nanoleaf shapes for my office/rig! I hate the interior lights I’ve got in my office and would love something that added some light and color so I could forget about the overheads entirely! 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Ralph ✭ April 9 edited April 9 Would like to experience nanoleaf as i cant afford it atm. Would be a great addition to my set up.  0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook LuffySenpai ✭ April 9 Wanted to do lucid dreams in the theme of RGB all around my room and that setup will help me out with the help of Nanoleaf. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Avandas ✭ April 9 Would look great in the background, lighting up my office wall! 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Vincent_D Philadelphia, PA ✭ April 9 I would love to try all the different combinations and customization options with Nanoleaf panels. Customization is really important to me when it comes to tech like this. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook xNYARLATH0TEPx ✭ April 9 I’d do up the ceiling of my bathroom! 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Gabbyk ✭ April 9 Imy dream living room setup is to have everything wifi controler and have  so much rgb that you barth rainbow 🌈 🔥 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Garrettlr ✭ April 9 I would love a set to help provide some extra lighting for the room I study in. Being able to adjust the light remotely to what I need and what mood I am in would be really helpful! 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook dkreal1980 Ohio ✭ April 9 I've seen these things in so many setups and they look pretty neat. I wouldn't mind getting my hands on a set to mess around with.  0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Giganiky ✭ April 9 Oh wow my dream is to have a Nanoleaf set up that I can sync up to my music! All of my friends have some of their own and I would LOVE to join the club! They would look amazing in the music production videos I shoot. 🙏🙏🙏 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Keendom ✭ April 9 I would form a crown on top of my battlestation as my gamertag is "Keendom" 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Inspector ✭ April 9 I would love to hang a set in my room to set the setting for gaming. World sync well with my desk pc im currently building. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook DaWeeOos ✭ April 9 I have an empty space above my bed. So if i won i would put them above my bed to complete my bedroom. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Helli ✭ April 9 I just want to make an H with the lights. Then probably buy a custom neon sign that is an outline of a helicopter. I'm currently in the process of renovating my room so that I can have my own personal space and create the ultimate gaming/working station bedroom. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Hmmbop ✭ April 9 Would love to get a dynamic backsplash setup with Nanoleaf Shapes as the centerpiece. My setup is definitely lacking in RGB so these seem like a perfect way to dive in.  0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook FlashbackHumor ✭ April 9 I've been wanting some Nanoleaf panels for a while, but always found them a bit out of my price reach! My partner and I have been wanting some classier looking RGB panels for our shared office/game space to make it look fun but not too over the top, as we slowly decorate it. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook MasterPCBuilder Long Beach ✭ April 9 I would love to hang this in my @masterpcbuilder office and in my YT studio!! 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Kyra ✭ April 9 I want to make mine into the shape of a cat for the background of my twitch stream! 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Snailspray ✭ April 9 I would hang them around my bed, my walls are a bit empty and I could definitely use some decorations in my room 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook TerminatorX1 ✭ April 9 I have been adding stuff to my pc since last year I finally got my 3080 on the msi day that you guys did a couple of months ago and I just moved to my new apartment and would like to customize my room and add the nanoleafs as a final gadget to my room they would look so nice as a final addition.( I build my pc at the fairfax branch but I did a lot of customization ever since) 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook emilio_aguinaga343 ✭ April 9 I would love to add this to my battlefield themed setup. I have some Phillips tv and bowl lights and this will add to the wall illumination so well 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Anhernandez0823 ✭ April 9 This would make an awesome addition to our gaming room! I would put them behind our couch for some creative lighting on that side of the room. My husband and I have back to back gaming set ups with some tasteful RGB and smart lighting. The nanoleaf kit would be just... **chefs kiss** ... icing on the cake!!  0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Serff ✭ April 9 My son has been saving up for some nanoleafs to level up his streaming background. He would be so excited to be surprised with some from Micro Center! Help make his environment then best around! 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook arcaaron ✭ April 9 Need to add more RGB in my life and need to spice up my backgroujd for my streams. been loving micro center and probably visited over 20 times just since July 2020. been looking for nanos forever and this might be my only chance to get en 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Jules ✭ April 9 edited April 9 I made a DIY version so these would be awesome to have for my game room!  0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Underblu2 ✭ April 9 Would be an awesome addition to my home office/gaming rig, I have always wanted to use the shapes to make a back lighting system around my 32" monitor. Also the new baby loves the changing colors of my PC so I'm sure she would love these as well! 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Dougie23 ✭ April 9 I want to make a really cool dragon design with the Nanoleaf! I would put them on the wall behind my PC! 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook dml9254 ✭ April 9 I light up my room with a little lamp and some Christmas lights so it would be really cool to have some nanoleafs to brighten up my setup with a pop of color 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook «12345» Leave a Comment Rich Text Editor. To edit a paragraph's style, hit tab to get to the paragraph menu. From there you will be able to pick one style. Nothing defaults to paragraph. An inline formatting menu will show up when you select text. Hit tab to get into that menu. Some elements, such as rich link embeds, images, loading indicators, and error messages may get inserted into the editor. You may navigate to these using the arrow keys inside of the editor and delete them with the delete or backspace key. Comment As ... Categories 6.7K All Categories 1K The Blog 36 What's Trending 164 How to & Technical Guides 10 Computer Hardware 119 Software 3 Home Office 6 Networking Audio/Visual 2 Home Automation 15 3D Printers 9 Maker 15 PC Build Guides 81 Reviews & Buying Guides 27 Build Showcase 13 Contests 35 Past Contests 825 The Community 1.7K General Discussion 105 New Members 87 Consumer Tech 27 Prebuilt PCs and Laptops 75 Software 2 Audio/Visual 12 Networking & Security 1 Home Automation 2 Digital Photography 3 Content Creators 21 Hobby Boards & Projects 23 3D Printing 49 Retro Arcade/Gaming 80 All Other Tech 1.2K Store Information and Policy 49 Off Topic 5 Community Ideas & Feedback 111 Your Completed Builds 2.6K Build-Your-Own PC 1.7K Help Choosing Parts 220 Graphics Cards 161 CPUs, Memory, and Motherboards 61 Cases and Power Supplies 19 Air and Liquid Cooling 13 Monitors and Displays 29 Peripherals 9 All Other Parts 21 Featured Categories We love seeing what our customers build Submit photos and a description of your PC to our build showcase Submit Now Looking for a little inspiration? 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SeanE ✭ December 2020 edited December 2020 in General Discussion So here's my build: Case — Fractal Design Meshify C ATX Mid Tower CPU — AMD Ryzen 9 3900X CPU Cooler — Wraith Prism stock cooler GPU — Asus NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2060 Motherboard — Gigabyte B550 AORUS MASTER ATX AM4 PSU — Corsair RM (2019) 850 W 80+ Gold Certified Fully Modular ATX Power Supply RAM — G.Skill Trident Z Neo 32 GB (2 x 16 GB) DDR4-3600 CL16 Memory Storage — Samsung 970 Evo 1 TB M.2-2280 NVME SSD Case Fans — 2x Noctua NF-A14 PWM 140mm (intake), 2x Fractal Design stock fans (exhaust) But after the painful process of building this the first time and connecting all the cables, the PC booted up on my first try. For a moment, I was proud of myself to have even gotten that far. I accidentally bent my CPU's pins along the way but managed to bend them back into place, so I was relieved to found out that it worked without too much problem.This is my first build and I dropped around $2,500 for it, not counting the extras I purchased outside of Micro Center (speakers, extra case fans). It took me over 20 hours to assemble it. Mainly because I'm a complete noob at this. Also because I had to break up the actual building process into separate sessions, because I work full-time and I have a very small workspace. So I had to put everything away once I had to leave the house. I managed to install Windows 10 Pro on it. I installed the necessary drivers to get the Internet connection, sound and graphics settings working. And even now, I've been trying to take small steps in improving the PC, hopefully culminating into something truly special. Then I noticed the PC's CPU is running way too hot.  When I checked both the motherboard's BIOS and a monitoring software (NZXT Cam), the temperature was around 40 - 50°C when it's not under load. Sometimes, the PC would freeze up for no apparent reason, even though the CPU isn't even close to 20% load. Sometimes, the screen just freezes entirely and I can't do anything. Sometimes, my programs would just freeze and the Task Manager is unable to shut any of them down. I did try resolving this by deactivating a piece of software, which I believe is part of the problem (Razer Cortex, which installed from my mouse). For a time, my PC didn't freeze anymore. Over the days, the CPU's temperature has been climbing up to 60°C and even as high as 80°C for just having Discord and Microsoft Edge open. My house isn't even terribly hot (and it's winter). So I realized this is eventually going to be a major problem, so I bought two Noctua case fans (as intake fans) in hopes that it would cool everything down. I moved the two stock case fans as exhaust It seemed to work a tiny bit, but not a significant drop. It still sometimes climbs up to 75°C. Today, I tried launching Metro: Exodus on Steam, a game that's known to be resource-intensive. Almost immediately upon launching the game, the whole PC shut off. My GPU has never even come to close to having problems with its temperature, so I knew it had to be the CPU. I tried decreasing the clock rate and the voltage usage, and it seems to cool down the CPU somewhat (it went below 60°C). But I knew this is only a temporary solution, not for the long run. I figured I must've done something wrong with the CPU cooler installation, so I decided to take apart the PC today in hopes that I can resolve it. So I cleaned up the existing thermal paste (apparently, I used a tiny bit too much last time as it was dripping down from the CPU's sides). I applied new thermal paste and tried a different way of applying it (thin spread using an applicator). I made sure the CPU cooler is screwed onto the standoffs tight enough and that the latches are on the standoffs. I put everything back together and tried to test the PC to make sure the whole thing powers on. And then, the video card is the only part that showed an LED on when I turned on the case's power switch. Everything else, including the motherboard and all the smaller parts, never turned on. I pressed the case's power button several times, but nothing turns on. The RAM's LED lights are not on. The fans are not spinning. So I tried checking on my cables: the 24-pin and the 4+4-pin connectors and all the small ones like the power switch, reset switch, etc. They're all plugged in and not loose. I checked the connections on both the motherboard and the PSU. Nothing's loose. Since the video card's LED actually turned on, I figured the PSU isn't the problem. It still managed to provide power after all. It's most likely the motherboard, the one thing that's supposed to bring power to everything else. I don't know how it happened, but I think I somehow broke it. I tried to take every precaution possible to make sure the PC is in a good environment to be worked on. I stayed away from carpeting. I kept my hands on the case most of the time to keep myself grounded. I even worked on this shirtless, everything to prevent the risk of a static charge. The CPU cooler was a very tight fit, so I had to loosen the standoffs just to get it in (and out the first time) to begin with. I don't know when it happened, but I think the motherboard broke. I did buy a $299.99 2-year protection plan with Micro Center as a safeguard. It's on my receipt listed as TWG TWG-2YR BYO BNDLE 023101, and it shows it covers the CPU, the SSD, the RAM, the GPU, the motherboard, the PSU, the case and the PC monitor. I'm just... devastated now. I put in so much time and effort in trying to put this rig together and it also costed me about $2,500. I spent hours just trying to troubleshoot every little thing to make sure everything works fine. I don't even know if I resolved my CPU's heating issue since the PC won't even boot. It's been almost a month since I bought the parts (I bought them during Black Friday sales). I tried my absolute best to do everything correctly. I even had the PC running decently at one point, and now it's a big expensive piece of metal. EDIT: I should mention that I did take out the CPU out of the socket (to clean it more easily) and both RAM sticks so I can easily take the CPU cooler out. The Wraith Prism cooler is a bulky thing; hard to put in, hard to take out. I also tried to clear out the CMOS. Didn't do anything. I tried replugging the 24-pin and 4+4-pin connectors again. Didn't do anything.  However, I did find something odd. When I unplugged the PC and plug it back in, then turned on the case's power switch, I saw a white light flash at the upper left area on my motherboard for a millisecond. It ONLY shows up if I unplug the case and plug it back in again, then turned on the power switch. More specifically, the light flashed around the Aorus board's logo, the piece of plastic that sits to the left of the CPU. Does that mean my motherboard is still functional? EDIT 12/09/20 -  So I tried to jumpstart the motherboard by placing a flathead against the two POWER SW pins. Unfortunately, nothing turned on. Then  tested the PSU by connecting the 4th and 5th slots. I switched the PSU on and the fan is spinning. However, I flipped the switch off and turned it on again. It didn't do anything. So I unplugged the PSU and tried the process again. When I flipped the switch on, it worked. But once again, I flipped the switch off and tried turning it on again. The fan didn't spin. Is this normal behavior for a PSU? 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Comments TSPhillipT admin December 2020 Hello @SeanE Thank you for posting on the Micro Center Community!  First thing I would like to say is AMAZING DETAILS on the issue, the steps you took and did.  It is very helpful to have as much detail as you put in, thank you so much! Now onto the issue, the system doesn't seem to be booting up at all, it is very possible to be a motherboard issue.  A No Boot usually points to one of three things, the motherboard, the power supply or the case.  We can easily eliminate two of these options, first eliminating the case.  If it doesn't boot when pressing the power switch, one thing could be the power switch itself being the issue, so let's try jump starting the motherboard.  All you need to do is make sure all plugs are in besides the front panel, and then with the PSU turned on, connect the two pins where the POWER SW would go to with a piece of metal like a screwdriver.  This completes the circuit and tells the motherboard to try turning on.  If it does turn on, we may have a bad POWER SW, but if it doesn't turn it, it eliminates the case.   The next thing to test is the PSU, using the Paperclip Method!  As complicated as it looks, it's pretty easy to do!   Taking a look at the 24 pin layout, this is as if you have it facing you with the clip at the top.  All you need to do, with the Power Supply disconnected from everything and only connected to an electrical outlet, is connect the Green port to any Black Port with a paper clip.  So from the top left, the 4th pin and any pin from 5-7.  This should cause the fan to spin on the PSU.  From here, if the Fan Spins, we can rule out the Power Supply as well and look at getting that Motherboard replaced.   0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook SeanE ✭ December 2020 Hello @TSPhillipT So I tried to jumpstart the motherboard by placing a flathead against the two POWER SW pins. Unfortunately, nothing turned on. Then  tested the PSU by connecting the 4th and 5th slots. I switched the PSU on and the fan is spinning. However, I flipped the switch off and turned it on again. It didn't do anything. So I unplugged the PSU and tried the process again. When I flipped the switch on, it worked. But once again, I flipped the switch off and tried turning it on again. The fan didn't spin. Is this normal behavior for a PSU? 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook TSKyleH admin December 2020 SeanE said: Hello @TSPhillipT So I tried to jumpstart the motherboard by placing a flathead against the two POWER SW pins. Unfortunately, nothing turned on. Then  tested the PSU by connecting the 4th and 5th slots. I switched the PSU on and the fan is spinning. However, I flipped the switch off and turned it on again. It didn't do anything. So I unplugged the PSU and tried the process again. When I flipped the switch on, it worked. But once again, I flipped the switch off and tried turning it on again. The fan didn't spin. Is this normal behavior for a PSU? Thank you for the information, since the fans did spin, I suspect the issue is more likely the motherboard. We do normally offer a 15 day return/exchange period for the motherboard, however if it was purchased in November it would qualify for our extended return until January 15th. Details on the return policy can be found on our knowledge base at https://community.microcenter.com/kb/articles/24-can-i-return-a-product-that-is-defective. If possible your welcome to try testing the power supply in another build altogether or if you have a spare laying around you can try connecting it up as well. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook TSMikeW admin December 2020 @SeanE The RM850 supports Zero RPM cooling mode, so it's possible the fan just isn't running after the initial startup, because this has kicked in once the temperature wasn't detected. And this 'resets' when you discharge the power supply. Unfortunately, discharging the power supply only proves if the PSU is totally dead. It doesn't tell you if you have a bad rail. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook SeanE ✭ December 2020 TSKyleH said: Thank you for the information, since the fans did spin, I suspect the issue is more likely the motherboard. We do normally offer a 15 day return/exchange period for the motherboard, however if it was purchased in November it would qualify for our extended return until January 15th. Details on the return policy can be found on our knowledge base at https://community.microcenter.com/kb/articles/24-can-i-return-a-product-that-is-defective. If possible your welcome to try testing the power supply in another build altogether or if you have a spare laying around you can try connecting it up as well. Unfortunately, I don't have another build lying around. But I'll exchange the motherboard whenever I have the time. TSMikeW said: @SeanE The RM850 supports Zero RPM cooling mode, so it's possible the fan just isn't running after the initial startup, because this has kicked in once the temperature wasn't detected. And this 'resets' when you discharge the power supply. Unfortunately, discharging the power supply only proves if the PSU is totally dead. It doesn't tell you if you have a bad rail. I see. So, should I take my chances with the current PSU I have? Or exchange this one too? I was pretty good to make sure it's off or disconnected from the wall outlet whenever I work on the PC, so I find it strange that it could potentially break down on me already. There's one more thing. The reason I went through all this trouble is to drop the CPU temperature since it was running unusually high when not under load. So I was going to reapply the thermal paste to see if it changes anything. This is strange seeing as how I didn't overclock the CPU (and have no intention to). I did accidentally drop the CPU at one point and bent the pins and I did read stories of CPUs still being able to work with damaged pins (though running hotter than usual). I did make sure the CPU actually fits into the socket perfectly, so I didn't think I would encounter any significant problems with it. I'm told that the stock Wraith Prism cooler should be fine regardless of what I do on the PC, but it doesn't seem like that's the case for me. Should I upgrade to a more powerful aftermarket cooler? Or would the problem be likely the CPU itself? The reason I'm asking so many questions is because the nearest Micro Center is about 30 miles away from me, lol. It would be a major hassle if I had to constantly drive between home and the store if I keep encountering problems like these. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Categories 6.7K All Categories 1K The Blog 36 What's Trending 164 How to & Technical Guides 10 Computer Hardware 119 Software 3 Home Office 6 Networking Audio/Visual 2 Home Automation 15 3D Printers 9 Maker 15 PC Build Guides 81 Reviews & Buying Guides 27 Build Showcase 13 Contests 35 Past Contests 824 The Community 1.7K General Discussion 105 New Members 87 Consumer Tech 27 Prebuilt PCs and Laptops 75 Software 2 Audio/Visual 12 Networking & Security 1 Home Automation 2 Digital Photography 3 Content Creators 21 Hobby Boards & Projects 23 3D Printing 49 Retro Arcade/Gaming 80 All Other Tech 1.2K Store Information and Policy 49 Off Topic 5 Community Ideas & Feedback 111 Your Completed Builds 2.6K Build-Your-Own PC 1.7K Help Choosing Parts 220 Graphics Cards 161 CPUs, Memory, and Motherboards 61 Cases and Power Supplies 19 Air and Liquid Cooling 13 Monitors and Displays 29 Peripherals 9 All Other Parts 21 Featured Categories We love seeing what our customers build Submit photos and a description of your PC to our build showcase Submit Now Looking for a little inspiration? See other custom PC builds and get some ideas for what can be done View Build Showcase View builds by: AMD Processors Intel Processors RTX 3090 RTX 3080 RTX 2080 Ti RTX 2080 Super RTX 2070 Super RTX 2070 RTX 2060 Super Radeon RX 5700XT Radeon RX 5700 Air Cooled Liquid Cooled SAME DAY CUSTOM BUILD SERVICE If You Can Dream it, We Can Build it. Services starting at $149.99 More Details Micro Center Homepage Desktops Laptops Computer Parts Computer Accessories Custom PC Builder Build Showcase Networking Electronics 3D Printing Service, Upgrades & Repairs Laptop Battery Replacement Laptop Screen Repair Virus and Malware Removal Hard Drive Recovery and Backup Apple MacBook Repair Custom Built PCs Schedule an Appointment © Vanilla Foundation Theme 2021 Powered By Vanilla Community Article How to Choose PC Parts: The Case — Micro Center Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker {$smarty.capture.menu} Activity Categories Discussions Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker Home › Cases and Power Supplies How to Choose PC Parts: The Case TSTonyV admin May 2020 edited March 10 in Cases and Power Supplies If you’re reading this post, you’re probably here for one reason: you want to build a new PC. Whether it’s your first time PC building or you’re an experienced builder and just need some extra clarification, this post is for you. With all the options available on the market, it can be overwhelming, but we’re here to help break it down.   If you’re looking for other parts as well, be sure to check out some of our other guides: How to Choose PC Parts: The Processor How to Choose PC Parts: The Motherboard How to Choose PC Parts: The Video Card How to Choose PC Parts: RAM How to Choose PC Parts: SSDs and Hard Drives How to Choose PC Parts: The Case This guide will go over how to choose a case, or tower, for your PC build. As always, let’s get our key questions in order: What is your budget? Cases are an area where you can save some cost, but a poorly designed case can potentially cause thermal problems if you're not careful. That said, there are some pretty decent cases for the budget-minded, and if you’re looking for something big and fancy, those options are there as well.  What form factor is your motherboard/power supply? I went over this a bit in the motherboard guide, but you need to make sure you match your motherboard's form factor to your case. This also applies to your power supply. What kind of cooling do you want? If you’re planning on using a custom liquid cooling system, you need a case that supports it. Additionally, some air coolers can be so tall that they don’t fit cleanly inside some cases. Be sure to check radiator support and fan clearances for your case to accommodate your preferred cooling method.  With those out of the way, let’s get into it. Things to know when buying a case: Case form factor As I mentioned in the motherboard guide, there are several form factors motherboards can come in: ATX, mATX, mini ITX, and eATX, and you need to make sure you get a case that can support it. The same goes for power supplies. If your hardware doesn’t actually fit inside your case, it doesn’t do you much good! What size computer case do I need? There are several different sizes of PC cases available. There’s no one specific size that you should or should not buy, so as long as the parts you chose will match the case's form factor, this is going to be based on your personal preferences.  Mid tower cases are what you’d consider the “standard” case size. They’re the most common desktop cases you’ll find and are typically a good balance between space, features, and size. A mid tower case will typically support ATX, mATX, and mini ITX motherboard form factors, and some may support eATX. Many are designed to support radiators for liquid cooling, but not all. Full tower cases are the largest cases you’ll typically see. A full tower case will support liquid cooling as well as eATX motherboards. These cases are particularly good when you have large amounts of PCIe devices that need space to breathe. They are also less common than mid tower cases.  Mini tower cases feature a smaller form factor for those looking for something with a smaller footprint. These can also generally be referred to as “small form factor” cases. These will support mATX and/or mini ITX motherboards. A few nay support radiators for liquid cooling, but they're a bit less common. Many mini tower cases support SFX and ITX power supplies while only some will support standard ATX power supplies.  One other thing to note is that, even within a certain size category, you’ll see a range of sizes. Some mid tower cases can be as large as small full tower cases. Some “mini” tower cases are just slightly smaller mid towers, while some are extremely compact. There is no standard case size, even amongst the different case styles. Do I need to buy case fans? While most PC cases will come with fans out of the box, some won’t. There is no set number of included fans either. Some cases will have one, others will have five. We’ll cover this more in a moment, but you’ll definitely want at least a few fans, as it’s important that you’re circulating fresh air through your system so you can keep your components cooled properly. You can always add fans to your case, but be sure to know whether your case comes with fans as the cost of additional case fans can add up quickly.  Case Thermals and Air Flow An important consideration when choosing your case is airflow. Being able to circulate fresh air through your computer properly is essential for cooling. A case with heavily restricted air intake means the heat created by your components won't properly vent, causing the temperature of your internal components to rise, potentially leading to crashes and damage. Heat from improper venting can greatly shorten the lifespan of your internal components. It's even possible that high temperatures will render your computer unusable. Manufacturers will handle airflow in different ways depending on what manufacturer you choose. Many PC cases use a mesh front panel. Some cases will have a solid front panel but have ventilation on the sides of the case instead. There are even open-air cases that have huge openings and gaps between all the panels. Every design is different, so it’s important to evaluate them on a… case by case basis. Even cases that look like they have lots of ventilation can be restrictive thanks to brackets inside blocking some airflow. PC cases with mesh front panels are not exempt from this either - the mesh itself can be poorly designed and restrict airflow. Always do your research. While airflow is essential for the average computer, be it gaming or home use, airflow is essential when overclocking. For the average user running with stock settings, as long as you don’t get a case that is completely sealed, you probably won't run into heating issues (a caveat: if you're using high power draw CPUs like the 10900k, 5900x, and 5950x, make sure your case is properly vented - these do get hot and need good airflow). But in overclocking, thermals rule everything: higher temperatures will affect stability and make it more difficult to push higher clock speeds. If you are an overclocker, make sure you get a well-ventilated case because every little bit counts. High temperatures can throttle your performance, and your case is an important part of that equation. It’s important to discuss how fans affect cooling. Even if you have a case that’s fairly well ventilated, you still have to make that air move. Most PC cases include fans when you purchase them, but some may not. Some may not provide enough fans to properly take advantage of the amount of ventilation available, so you might need to purchase extra. You don’t necessarily have to fill every possible slot for fans available on the case, but you need something to actually pull air in and exhaust air out of the case. Generally, you’ll want a minimum of one intake fan at the front and one exhaust fan at the top or back. Having two intakes and one exhaust, or two intakes and two exhaust, are good general setups that would work for most people.  What cases do we recommend? There are a lot of cases available at various price ranges and different sizes. We won’t cover all of them because there are just too many, but we’ll cover each of the popular form factors and give some recommendations that should work. Remember, you can almost always find something that will match your personal preferences and price range, so if something I mention here doesn’t quite suit your fancy, do your research! Mid Tower Cases NZXT H510: NZXT has a solid reputation for the overall design of their cases in tooling and cable management. This case is not the greatest for airflow, but it is “easy to build in,” so this is a great choice for those on their first PC build. Comes with two 120mm fans, one on top, one in the back.  Lian Li 205: Powerspec approved! We’ve used this case in many of our Powerspec models, and it’s a solid option all around for space and cost. Like the H510, it doesn’t have the best airflow, but the design is overall very clean and is good for first-time builders, featuring cable holes for easier cable management. Plus tempered glass side panels always look good! Comes with two 120mm fans, one on top, one in the back.  Cooler Master NR600: This PC case features a mesh front panel, boasting some good airflow in its price range. If you want a less expensive case and plan on overclocking or using one of the really hot high-end CPUs, this will be a great option. Comes with two 120mm fans, one in front, one in the back.  Lian Li 205 Mesh: A new version of the Lian Li 205, this time with a mesh front panel. It takes the same type of design you’ll find on the 205, but the added mesh front panel and fans increase your airflow capabilities. Comes with two 140mm fans in the front and one 120mm fan in the back, all equipped with RGB lighting. Fractal Design Meshify S2: Another mesh front-panel case with great airflow; this one is slightly larger than the cases mentioned previously, so it’s more friendly for internal space. And it has tempered glass panels! Comes with three 140mm fans, two in the front, one in the back.  Lian Li PC-O11 Dynamic: This case was designed especially for those with liquid cooling in mind: you can install up to three 360mm radiators in this case. It features a dual-chamber design where the power supply is mounted behind the motherboard. It doesn’t come with any fans, so you’ll have to supply your own. Full Tower Cases Lian Li Lancool II Mesh: One of the most popular full tower case options right now. This new version fixes some of the issues of the previous Lancool II by refining some of the tooling/design and giving you some great airflow with the mesh front panel. It also features tempered glass side panels. This is a great all-around option. Comes with two 140mm fans in the front and one 120mm fan in the back.  Lian Li O11 Dynamic XL: All the great things about the normal O11, but in a bigger package. If you’re looking for something that needs a little more room but still really like the design of the O11, look no further. Like the Lancool II Mesh, the 011 Dynamic XL also features tempered glass side panels. Does not come with fans included, but does feature RGB LED strips. Corsair Obsidian 1000D: This case is about as overkill as it gets. This case is not only huge, and it actually has enough room for you to build two different computer systems inside: it will fit one full eATX system and still has enough room to put in another mini ITX system. It can support multiple 480mm radiators and up to 18 different fans. It’s also completely encased in tempered glass and coated with RGB lighting. Fans not included.  Mini tower Cases Cooler Master NR200P: This case is a newer entry on this list and is a great option for the small factor folks out there. It can support up to a 280mm radiator on the side, multiple 120mm fans on different sides and can support GPUs 2.5-3 slots wide. The entire case can be disassembled for easy installation/setup and it is covered in mesh everywhere to maintain good airflow capabilities. It also features tempered glass side panels so you always know what's happening inside. Supports mini ITX and mini DTX motherboards. Includes two 120mm fans.  Lian Li TU150: This case is specifically for mini ITX builds. It’s not the absolute smallest ITX case but is still very compact without compromising too much on cooling capabilities. It can only support a 120mm radiator if you’re into liquid cooling. It also has a carrying handle on the top of the case! No fans included.  Lian Li O11 D Mini: This is the little brother of the PC-O11 Dynamic. It sports a lot of the same design but in a smaller package. It’s bigger than the other mini-towers listed here, supporting up to a 360mm radiator in the bottom and top. It encroaches on being a mid tower case but still a little smaller than average. Like the other O11 models, no fans included.    If you have follow-up questions, feel free to comment below, and if you’re still looking for part recommendations, we have guides for Processors, Motherboards, Graphics Cards, RAM, Hard Drives, and Cases. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Comments JasonA ✭ May 2020 What general recommendations would you make regarding additional fans to improve the airflow in the Lian Li LanCool II ? There is talk about a new "Mesh" version being available (essentially removing the RGB lighting, replacing the solid section in the middle of the front panel with mesh, and perhaps even replacing the flip-down power supply doors with mesh too). There was an announcement in January at CES 2020 and there are YouTube videos by Gamers Nexus (one of which shows the prototype "Mesh" version at the factory).  Nevertheless it seems that COVID-19 will probably delay production for some time.  It doesn't yet appear on the Lian Li website, which suggests it's still a long way from getting into stores. So in the interim, what options are recommended ? And can you say anything about the existing flow rates of the factory-supplied fans for the LanCool II ? I couldn't find any specifications, beyond that they were 120mm. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook TSTonyV admin May 2020 edited May 2020 JasonA said: What general recommendations would you make regarding additional fans to improve the airflow in the Lian Li LanCool II ? There is talk about a new "Mesh" version being available (essentially removing the RGB lighting, replacing the solid section in the middle of the front panel with mesh, and perhaps even replacing the flip-down power supply doors with mesh too). There was an announcement in January at CES 2020 and there are YouTube videos by Gamers Nexus (one of which shows the prototype "Mesh" version at the factory).  Nevertheless it seems that COVID-19 will probably delay production for some time.  It doesn't yet appear on the Lian Li website, which suggests it's still a long way from getting into stores. So in the interim, what options are recommended ? And can you say anything about the existing flow rates of the factory-supplied fans for the LanCool II ? I couldn't find any specifications, beyond that they were 120mm. There are honestly a lot of great fans to choose from. Corsair's ML fans are good, and I have several ML140 fans in my own case. At high RPMs they can get fairly loud, but they have very good airflow and static pressure. They also make 120mm versions.  https://www.corsair.com/us/en/Categories/Products/Fans/Magnetic-Levitation-Fans/ml-pro-config/p/CO-9050045-WW#tab-tech-specs Noctua makes some great fans as well, like the NF-A12 and NF-A14. Noctua is one of the best fan manufacturers on the market, and they're known for providing excellent airflow and quiet operation. The brown color scheme can be offputting, but it wouldn't matter in a case like the Lancool II anyway since you can't really see them. Plus, they've finally started making all black fans. They list all their options and airflow specs here: https://noctua.at/en/products/fan Unfortunately I don't know exactly which fans come with the Lancool II. I've spent some time researching and the best I can get is just the size. Even Lian Li on their website only lists that it has 3x120mm fans, nothing about the specific part numbers. Hopefully somebody else could weigh in on this.  1 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Categories 6.7K All Categories 1K The Blog 36 What's Trending 164 How to & Technical Guides 10 Computer Hardware 119 Software 3 Home Office 6 Networking Audio/Visual 2 Home Automation 15 3D Printers 9 Maker 15 PC Build Guides 81 Reviews & Buying Guides 27 Build Showcase 13 Contests 35 Past Contests 824 The Community 1.7K General Discussion 105 New Members 87 Consumer Tech 27 Prebuilt PCs and Laptops 75 Software 2 Audio/Visual 12 Networking & Security 1 Home Automation 2 Digital Photography 3 Content Creators 21 Hobby Boards & Projects 23 3D Printing 49 Retro Arcade/Gaming 80 All Other Tech 1.2K Store Information and Policy 49 Off Topic 5 Community Ideas & Feedback 111 Your Completed Builds 2.6K Build-Your-Own PC 1.7K Help Choosing Parts 220 Graphics Cards 161 CPUs, Memory, and Motherboards 61 Cases and Power Supplies 19 Air and Liquid Cooling 13 Monitors and Displays 29 Peripherals 9 All Other Parts 21 Featured Categories We love seeing what our customers build Submit photos and a description of your PC to our build showcase Submit Now Looking for a little inspiration? See other custom PC builds and get some ideas for what can be done View Build Showcase View builds by: AMD Processors Intel Processors RTX 3090 RTX 3080 RTX 2080 Ti RTX 2080 Super RTX 2070 Super RTX 2070 RTX 2060 Super Radeon RX 5700XT Radeon RX 5700 Air Cooled Liquid Cooled SAME DAY CUSTOM BUILD SERVICE If You Can Dream it, We Can Build it. Services starting at $149.99 More Details Micro Center Homepage Desktops Laptops Computer Parts Computer Accessories Custom PC Builder Build Showcase Networking Electronics 3D Printing Service, Upgrades & Repairs Laptop Battery Replacement Laptop Screen Repair Virus and Malware Removal Hard Drive Recovery and Backup Apple MacBook Repair Custom Built PCs Schedule an Appointment © Vanilla Foundation Theme 2021 Powered By Vanilla Community Article Fan or cooler noise on a PowerSpec G436 Gaming Computer — Micro Center Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker {$smarty.capture.menu} Activity Categories Discussions Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker Home › General Discussion Fan or cooler noise on a PowerSpec G436 Gaming Computer rcalinjageman ✭ January 2 in General Discussion I'm not quite a month into owning a PoweSpect G436.  Yesterday the rig started making a very loud and continuous noise while powered up.  It sounded like a cable running on a fan, but I have checked all the fans and none of them seem to be the culprit.  The sound seems to be localized to the Power Cooler.  Never dealt with a liquid cooling before.  Here's a video showing the sound and how stopping each easily-accessible fan does not alleviate the sound: https://photos.app.goo.gl/hu2nM3YpR9yzq9iu9 Is there some easy fix--something to check or tap to reduce the noise? If not, what's the procedure/policy for remedying this under warranty? Thanks, Bob 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook «12» Comments Ian admin January 2 rcalinjageman said: I'm not quite a month into owning a PoweSpect G436.  Yesterday the rig started making a very loud and continuous noise while powered up.  It sounded like a cable running on a fan, but I have checked all the fans and none of them seem to be the culprit.  The sound seems to be localized to the Power Cooler.  Never dealt with a liquid cooling before.  Here's a video showing the sound and how stopping each easily-accessible fan does not alleviate the sound: https://photos.app.goo.gl/hu2nM3YpR9yzq9iu9 Is there some easy fix--something to check or tap to reduce the noise? If not, what's the procedure/policy for remedying this under warranty? Thanks, Bob Greetings, after reviewing the video, this doesn't seem like something we'd be able to fix outside of the store. It seems to be something wrong with the cooler itself. We are able to assist with the warranty directly at your local Micro Center store. An appointment is not needed for service, there may be some available online at https://www.microcenter.com/site/service/service.aspx Otherwise please visit the store with the computer and charger/power cable for assistance, store hours are 10am until 9pm Mon-Sat, 11am-6pm Sun.  0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook rcalinjageman ✭ January 30 After 3 trips to Microcenter to try to fix this problem (the power cooler that needed to be replaced was out of stock each time), Microcenter replaced this PowerSpec outright (1/17/2021).  But now (13 days later), the same noise has developed in the new unit (https://photos.app.goo.gl/nGW7urJswpZQuZFu8). The techs who helped the first time were very familiar with this issue--they said they had been fixing this a lot.  They also said that in addition to making the computer unacceptably loud, it would, over time, damage the computer. What is my next step?  Replace the unit again?  Switch to a different cooling system?  Return the unit completely?  No one at the physical store answers the phone.  I'd like to settle on a solution before bringing it in, to save myself multiple long trips back and forth.  1 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Ian admin January 30 rcalinjageman said: After 3 trips to Microcenter to try to fix this problem (the power cooler that needed to be replaced was out of stock each time), Microcenter replaced this PowerSpec outright (1/17/2021).  But now (13 days later), the same noise has developed in the new unit (https://photos.app.goo.gl/nGW7urJswpZQuZFu8). The techs who helped the first time were very familiar with this issue--they said they had been fixing this a lot.  They also said that in addition to making the computer unacceptably loud, it would, over time, damage the computer. What is my next step?  Replace the unit again?  Switch to a different cooling system?  Return the unit completely?  No one at the physical store answers the phone.  I'd like to settle on a solution before bringing it in, to save myself multiple long trips back and forth.  Hello, I'll be sending you an email regarding this. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook DMA ✭ February 1 I had the same issue with my AIO cooling unit. It started exactly on the two week anniversary. I was told I could bring it in and have it fixed under warranty but I didn't want to have to leave it for who knows how long so I ended up buying another of the same cooler and replacing it myself. I hope this one lasts. The pumps on these seem to be very poor quality. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook MattP299 ✭ February 4 rcalinjageman  - Did this get fixed? My PowerSpec G467 is making a strange sound for the last ~2 weeks and I can't tell what it's coming from. It's brand new.  0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook DMA ✭ February 4 Well, I bought a new water cooler, same as the original and it's been in about a week and so far so good. No rattle. At some point I may return the original and get it replaced but more likely I'll just be happy if this one stays quiet. It seems to do a good job of cooling. Plus I added one of the fans from the new cooler to the rear of the chassis for added exhaust flow and that seemed to bring the temps down another few degrees C.  I was disappointed though that the original cooler pump only lasted 2 weeks. When I decided to replace it I wanted to put a good high quality air cooler such as the Noctua but as it turned out, there is not enough room in the case for any good quality air coolers. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook LandShark admin February 5 Hello, @DMA if there was an issue with the watercooler in your build I would recommend bringing it into our service department. Since you mentioned that you just recently purchased this, it should still be under warranty and any part failure would be covered by said warranty. Thank you for sharing this feedback about your build. I'll be sharing this with our PowerSpec team! Please let me know if you have any other questions or concerns! 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook BradESD Sioux Falls, SD ✭ February 9 edited February 9 @Ian @LandShark, I have the same problems on my Powerspec G436. Cooler Master Pump causing extremely loud noise. You can feel one of the pump hoses vibrating. started about 6 weeks after purchase (really only 4 weeks of operation as it sat wrapped up as a Christmas Present). About the same time as the pump failure, I also had the Microphone jack now causing what sounds like a ground loop hum when at microphone or even just any simple 1/4" to 1/8" mic adapter is plugged into either motherboard or case MIC jacks. Even without any other perpherial plugged in and an AC isolation transformer/hum bucker installed it continues. Even shut down the Magic Light LED's completely and disconnected all cords/connectors except desktop AC power and any mic or mic adapter and wireless(or wired) headphones and still bad static and hum. Never did this before the pump seemed to go bad. With no headphones plugged in the mic sensitivity meter shows tons of noise, with just any mic adapter plugged in as well. Can't even use it for audio production now, as this PC is used both for gaming and audio studio production. I live 4 hours away (Sioux Falls, SD) and only had the PC for 2 months. (problems started a few weeks ago). Not happy with the quality on this PC right now...especially after seeing all the complaints on the cooler masters. @Ian @LandShark, I hope to come in and get these diagnosed and resolved asap. If it cannot be resolved same day, can I exchange for a replacement G436(I see there are 15 in stock currently), exchange for a different model/upgrade, or a refund? 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook edward_s ✭ February 9 I am also having the same issue with my G436, purchased a month ago. Will same day repair in store be possible? I live 3 hours away from the nearest Microcenter, so I would really prefer not to have to make two separate trips. 1 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook LandShark admin February 9 Hello @BradESD and @edward_s. Welcome to the community! I'm sorry to hear that you're having an issue with your PowerSpec G436! Please expect an email from us! Since you're both fairly far from the store, I'd like to get some more information to better assist you! 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook BradESD Sioux Falls, SD ✭ February 9 edited February 9 @LandShark , i received an email asking for Phone number, which I responded too and provided. Please have a St Paul, MN Microcenter manager all me as soon as possible. I did talk to a Service department technician (Austin I think) at the St. Paul, MN store and was helpful in answering a few questions but need a manager to discuss same day repair or replacement options, as I cannot be driving back and forth 4 hours each way for multiple days...especially when it seems that this is a known and ever growing customer issue with at least this G436 configuration. I would also like to know what the replacement to the cooler master model being used and is showing mass failure, because I don't want to go through this same problem weeks later as I see others have already endured. Thank you. Questions: Is this a Gen1 or Gen 2 Cooler Master MasterLiquid ML240L installed in these recent builds? In regards to the defective Cooler Master, Is there any way to get a replacement Cooler Master sent to my address via UPS, USPS, or FedEx? I can install it just fine and mail back the defective one. I am willing to use my credit card to hold until defective cooler master is returned. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook TSTDavey admin February 10 Hello @BradESD we have the request in the ST Paul Store leadership call back queue. If they don't call you back today it should be tomorrow as they attempt to return customer calls during business hours. Let us know if you do not get a all back by tomorrow afternoon. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Climbingmoon ✭ February 15 Purchased a G436 for my son. It has the exact same issue with the pump. I will attempt to get it replaced. How have the other replacements gone? 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Climbingmoon ✭ February 16 I took the G436 to Microcenter Parkville, MD today. The person who assisted me was incredibly helpful and offered to assist. They acknowledged they had seen several instances of this issue. They only bad news is that they did not have a replacement part in stock or an ETA on when would arrive. They created a work order for me and will contact me with replacement options. I'm hoping for a quick resolution! 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook LandShark admin February 16 Great to hear that you're getting assistance in our store! If there is anything that I can help you with, please let me know! 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Climbingmoon ✭ February 22 edited February 22 @LandShark I called to check in and there is still no ETA for the part. It seems like there is no availability or process to get the replacement part. I will try to wait it out another week, but I was hoping for a faster resolution. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook digital44 ✭ February 23 edited February 23 I have the exact same issue with my G467 (same coolermaster 240ml), mine happened to go bad around 6-7 weeks. I keep hearing from multiple people that these coolers go bad after two weeks. I think it is pretty ridiculous that they cannot replace the AIO with another (better) cooler. I even said I would pay the difference for a more reliable cooler and they said they can only replace what was originally in there. At this point I am probably going to buy a better cooler myself. Otherwise I'm going to be making a trip to Microcenter every 2 weeks to get the bad cooler replaced when this is clearly a known issue with these. Pretty ridiculous if you ask me. 1 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook TSTDavey admin February 23 Hello @digital44 and thanks for posting on the Microcenter Community Forum. Sorry you are also having issues with your G467 and the cooler master cpu cooler. We understand your stance on the cooler master cooler. But we'll add that these coolers have good reviews and are considered a very good quality manufactured cooler by cooler master. Unfortunately with pre-built computers, whether its our brand, Powerspec, or a Dell, HP, etc., original oem parts is what is replaced in a pre-built PC under a warranty service. That's store policy. If the system was Dell computer we'd have to replace the cooler with the same manufactured cooler that originally came with the Dell computer, or the Dell Manufacturer's warranty would be voided. Its up to you, but you could bring your powerspec to the store for service, assuming you are still under the 1 year warranty. The cooler master is actually a good cooler. Sounds like the cooler unit installed was quite frankly a dud. Sometimes computer components/units can be manufactured defective without the manufacturer or retailer knowing. The nature of electronics and technology. You could also install another AIO of your chose into your powerspec and it would not void the warranty for the other components. But the warranty will not cover parts & labor for the AIO you installed nor will it cover components that are damaged or malfunctioned due to the AIO cooler the customer installed. I hope that made sense. Sorry for the long book addition. Just wanted to share somethings from the MC side of the community house. Let us know if you have any other questions. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook digital44 ✭ February 23 https://community.microcenter.com/discussion/comment/28282#Comment_28282 Thank you for the reply and I appreciate you laying the options out and I also understand that you have to go by the store policy. I ended up bringing it in this morning and they offered an alternative option that I am very pleased with so all is well. :) 1 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook LandShark admin February 23 @digital44 Glad to hear that we were able to make an exception for you here! Thanks for sharing your experience! 1 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook TSTDavey admin February 23 @digital44 Great to hear the store's options are satisfying to you and all well. I concur, thanks for sharing your experience. 1 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Climbingmoon ✭ February 28 @digital44 Can you detail the alternative provided? It has been two weeks and the local store has not provided any update, ETA, or alternative. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook DMA ✭ March 1 Are you saying that you've had your new rig in the store for two weeks waiting for a repair and you have not been provided any update? If this is true it is appalling. My brand new G436 AIO Cooler Master crapped out exactly two weeks after I bought it. I didn't want to take it back to the store and have to wait for a repair but I never thought it would take WEEKS to get resolved. Regardless I reluctantly went and purchased a replacement cooler myself, exactly the same brand and model hoping that my odds of 1 out of 2 performing without sounding like a water bong festival would be fairly high. And so far so good after about a month on the 2nd unit. But the fact remains that these Cooler Master AIO's are not performing very well at all with a high failure rate. Microcenter should be taking care of these issues promptly. A customer shouldn't have to wait weeks to repair a brand new computer due to poor quality components. Especially when so many are having issues. They need to look at a solution at the build level not at the warranty replacement level. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Climbingmoon ✭ March 1 @DMA Luckily, I still have the unit but it has been over two weeks with no clear indication of the plan to address the issue. I called the store but it appears they are not answering the phone, the chat support is no help saying I just have to wait because the part is back ordered. I have asked for a call back but the previous call back never yielded any results. The only option seems to be taking a trip to the store to beg for alternative options. @TSTDavey @LandShark Are you able to provide any assistance to get this escalated? 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook LandShark admin March 1 Hello @Climbingmoon I'd be happy to look into this. Someone should have reached out at this time. My apologies for the lack of response thus far. I'd like to get more info about this to see why this may have occurred and to ensure it doesn't in the future. I'd strongly recommend going to the store about this if you are having hardware issues with your PowerSpec device. Please be on the lookout for an email from us. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Climbingmoon ✭ March 1 @LandShark I visited the store on 2/16, this is when they created the original service ticket. While they were very nice, the problem seems to be that the replacement unit is back ordered with no ETA. My opinion is that if a replacement part cannot be provided in a timely manor, then a similar alternative part should be offered or they should start gutting them from the existing pre-build units they have until the back order is complete. I would prefer a different replacement part at this point given the high failure rate. I was open to alternative options but no one seems to be willing to provide one. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook digital44 ✭ March 1 https://community.microcenter.com/discussion/comment/28681#Comment_28681 Hey. When I brought it in to the store and mentioned that the CoolerMaster went bad, they recommended an air cooler instead. They put in a Noctua NH-D15S, it was ready later that day but I picked it up the following day. GL man hope you get this resolved soon! 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook DMA ✭ March 2 https://community.microcenter.com/discussion/comment/28741#Comment_28741 I wanted to replace the Cooler Master AIO with the very Noctua cooler you have referred to but the specs on the cooler and the case indicated there would not be enough headroom. Apparently it does fit. How much clearance do you have with the glass case cover? If so I will definitely replace with the Noctua if (or maybe I should say when) this CM unit wets the bed. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook digital44 ✭ March 3 https://community.microcenter.com/discussion/comment/28810#Comment_28810 Not sure exactly how much clearance but it's close to the glass, maybe quarter of an inch. I have the mid tower case, Lian Li LANCOOL 205 i believe. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook DMA ✭ March 4 How are your temps with the Noctua as compared to the CM AIO? Also did you add any fans, assuming you removed the two that were integrated into the radiator? 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook «12» Categories 6.7K All Categories 1K The Blog 36 What's Trending 164 How to & Technical Guides 10 Computer Hardware 119 Software 3 Home Office 6 Networking Audio/Visual 2 Home Automation 15 3D Printers 9 Maker 15 PC Build Guides 81 Reviews & Buying Guides 27 Build Showcase 13 Contests 35 Past Contests 824 The Community 1.7K General Discussion 105 New Members 87 Consumer Tech 27 Prebuilt PCs and Laptops 75 Software 2 Audio/Visual 12 Networking & Security 1 Home Automation 2 Digital Photography 3 Content Creators 21 Hobby Boards & Projects 23 3D Printing 49 Retro Arcade/Gaming 80 All Other Tech 1.2K Store Information and Policy 49 Off Topic 5 Community Ideas & Feedback 111 Your Completed Builds 2.6K Build-Your-Own PC 1.7K Help Choosing Parts 220 Graphics Cards 161 CPUs, Memory, and Motherboards 61 Cases and Power Supplies 19 Air and Liquid Cooling 13 Monitors and Displays 29 Peripherals 9 All Other Parts 21 Featured Categories We love seeing what our customers build Submit photos and a description of your PC to our build showcase Submit Now Looking for a little inspiration? See other custom PC builds and get some ideas for what can be done View Build Showcase View builds by: AMD Processors Intel Processors RTX 3090 RTX 3080 RTX 2080 Ti RTX 2080 Super RTX 2070 Super RTX 2070 RTX 2060 Super Radeon RX 5700XT Radeon RX 5700 Air Cooled Liquid Cooled SAME DAY CUSTOM BUILD SERVICE If You Can Dream it, We Can Build it. Services starting at $149.99 More Details Micro Center Homepage Desktops Laptops Computer Parts Computer Accessories Custom PC Builder Build Showcase Networking Electronics 3D Printing Service, Upgrades & Repairs Laptop Battery Replacement Laptop Screen Repair Virus and Malware Removal Hard Drive Recovery and Backup Apple MacBook Repair Custom Built PCs Schedule an Appointment © Vanilla Foundation Theme 2021 Powered By Vanilla Community Article [CLOSED] Beat Our Build and Enter to Win a $500 gift card! - Page 12 — Micro Center Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker {$smarty.capture.menu} Activity Categories Discussions Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker Home › Contests › Past Contests [CLOSED] Beat Our Build and Enter to Win a $500 gift card! «1…891011121314» Comments Eg0re80 ✭ May 31 I went with a Team Red MSI build and tried my hardest to make a great one under 2K https://www.microcenter.com/site/content/custom-pc-builder.aspx?load=26d91ae3-3983-411e-83cb-cc3918d68a60 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Capokid ✭ May 31 edited May 31 Gib giftcard plz, daddy needs a new CPU. This is my dream build btw- https://www.microcenter.com/site/content/custom-pc-builder.aspx?load=91253842-1d85-4c7f-bfeb-10647961be49 I just wish you guys had the lian Li 215x case. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook richkar ✭ May 31 I like this parts list went AMD for cpu and gpu. Just because I dont have an all AMD build. This seems insane for a pc but its the whole setup minus the chair and desk. And I think ive got fairly good parts list. The exact Memory isnt on the QVL but I picked what I thought might work well because Ryzens like Fast ram. https://www.microcenter.com/site/content/custom-pc-builder-amd.aspx?load=c0fbec5b-6e8f-4ff0-9149-47fbb3e673d2 What do you think?? 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Redmadness ✭ May 31 I built a lot of mid-range systems before and now want to try out a custom loop while micro center doesn't provide a GPU block and all the water cooling accessories I tried my best to include them all. I went for the best bang for the buck for a high-end system. Also putting two SATA SSD's in raid for storing large files such as games. The NVM SSD for main storage. The Corsair - RM850 for its good price range and low noise levels. And mostly sticking to all corsair products for Corsair ICUE connection. For the peripherals the Razer - BlackWidow V3 Mini for its small size and wireless capabilities. The Razer - BlackShark V2 Pro Wireless for being best in class in the headphone department along with the Logitech G - PRO Wireless. https://www.microcenter.com/site/content/custom-pc-builder-amd.aspx?load=5f9f4751-f7a9-44f4-b570-0ce3931ef6cf 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook POF ✭ May 31 edited May 31 I been looking in build a gaming pc since the beginning of 2020 but the year was not good for anyone so i stop and waited to see if the year got any better in 2021 i was hoping to build one so i can learn to record gaming and post video and more and here is my build hope you all like the grand total for this build is 1,557.87+tax. ps if something is wrong in the build please comment for the future build. https://www.microcenter.com/site/content/custom-pc-builder.aspx?load=b1c03574-8647-4842-927f-fca2593d4627 AMD Ryzen 7 3700X Matisse 3.6GHz 8-Core AM4 Boxed Processor with Wraith Prism Cooler=279.99 Gigabyte B550M DS3H AMD AM4 microATX Motherboard=99.99 Crucial Ballistix Gaming 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR4-3200 PC4-25600 CL16 Dual Channel Desktop Memory Kit BL2K8G32C16U4B - Black=87.99 NZXT H510 Tempered Glass ATX Mid-Tower Computer Case - Black=69.99 PowerSpec 650W Power Supply Semi-Modular 80 Plus Bronze Certified ATX Active PFC SLI Crossfire Ready Gaming PC Computer Switching PSU=64.99 EVGA NVIDIA GeForce RTX 3060 XC Gaming Dual-Fan 12GB GDDR6 PCIe 4.0 Graphics Card=399.99 Inland Professional 1TB SSD 3D NAND SATA 3.0 6 GBps 2.5 Inch 7mm Internal Solid State Drive=97.99 Inland Premium 512GB SSD M.2 2280 PCIe NVMe 3.0 x4 3D NAND Internal Solid State Drive, High-Speed Read/Write Speed up to 3100 MBps and 1900 MBps, NVMe 1.3 & PCIe 3.1 Compatible=59.99 Seagate BarraCuda 2TB 7200RPM SATA III 6Gb/s 3.5" Internal Hard Drive=54.99 Microsoft Windows 10 Home 64-bit OEM DVD - English=119.99 ESET Internet Security - 1 Device, 1 Year (OEM)=59.99 Acer HA220Q Bbix 21.5" Full HD 75Hz HDMI VGA FreeSync IPS LED Monitor=119.99 Bitspower Touchaqua Notos RGB 120mm Case Fan - 3 Pack=41.99 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Joe_Buttons ✭ June 1 A $500 giftcard could be beyond useful in a world where GPUs are nonexistent or triple msrp. https://www.microcenter.com/site/content/custom-pc-builder.aspx?load=8111ea03-e2b8-4d3a-a5c8-0e4df0eb99d1 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook joe_cool ✭ June 1 heres a budget starter build for great 1080p performance plus great upgrade options https://www.microcenter.com/site/content/custom-pc-builder.aspx?load=c5a61be3-ff4c-4b85-b78e-59e33a346879 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook DrBOOFenshmirtz ✭ June 1 edited June 1 I truly appreciate bang for the buck builds as appose to going all out and full blown budget. in this contest I have for you the best bang for your buck build equipped with a Ryzen 5 3600 in a full sized atx board and a 1660 super for $850. if you want future compatibility then this 89 dollar motherboard is perfect because dispute it being B450 chipset I'm running my personal rig with the exact same motherboard but with a Ryzen 5600x overclocked to 4.5 ghz and it only needed a simple bios update. I also have personal experience many other parts with this build like the SSD, power supply, and ram that i used in multiple builds and they all punch above their price making them all great VALUE OR MONEY. especially the ram which is very overclocking capable. all in all a great bang for your buck build which I have good experience with the parts. I hope you enjoy! https://www.microcenter.com/site/content/custom-pc-builder.aspx?load=cff50db4-7ca1-46ee-a2c0-5321af0074c1 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook deftripp ✭ June 1 https://www.microcenter.com/site/content/custom-pc-builder-amd.aspx?load=db2eef67-3ae2-4854-99b5-a5ce6f97f331 not really the best pc ever but its what im trying to upgrade to from a hand me down from 2009, i just picked up the gpu last weekend at the dallas mc, im also going to use the power supply from my current pc. even if i do win, the gift card will go to building this pc lol 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook NiqHunter ✭ June 1 edited June 1 https://www.microcenter.com/site/content/custom-pc-builder-amd.aspx?load=158ae8ff-49e2-4bb9-a006-44ef6ac7c86b Here's the best I could do for a workstation, well the arctic version. And this is the best marketing idea I've seen to drive traffic to your builder and community. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Alexfs351595 ✭ June 1 I made this build with a small factor case with a over powered components. Honestly it really looks so nice on a o-11 dynamic. enjoy https://www.microcenter.com/site/content/custom-pc-builder.aspx?load=b4454526-e28c-432a-8b53-8f5f0ca058f6 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook TTVrobocorpse ✭ June 1 This is as close as I could get to my actual build... https://www.microcenter.com/site/content/custom-pc-builder.aspx?load=a6f31296-9b7c-4332-8e5b-ed9665f77852 I have a regular Strix 3090, not the white edition... 1200 watt Thor, 4000 mhz 64gb Gskill ram, an inwin 909 case which is no longer available, XG279Q monitors which are the same exact panel as these, but with a different base that lights up... 2x 140mm Noctua Industrial 3000 RPM intake fans, 1x 120 MM Noctua Industrial 3000 RPM mid case fan, and the 3x120 MM Noctua Industrial from the Ryujin 360 configured as exhaust. I'm not able to select all these precise components. The 2x 2TB 980 Pro's are configured in Raid 0. The 5950x is running at 4.650 GHZ all core + boost on PBOII and TPUII. I game, I also do CAD/3d/video editing, etc... and it is fantastic. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook YourAdHere ✭ June 1 https://www.microcenter.com/site/content/custom-pc-builder.aspx?load=fa3d5200-0550-42ee-bb86-f8c2ccdf03fb I changed a lot of things, but most importantly I upgraded the CPU, GPU, and changed the 2.5 in. SSD to an m.2 nvme drive instead to take advantage of some extra speed. I felt like the CPU would have a lot more power if it was changed to one of the new AMD ones. I also added 16 gigs of crucial ddr4 and picked a decent motherboard for this build. (and I definitely didn't forget RGB) Now, for the GPU, I made it a 3060, because let's face it, it's worth waiting a while for the new 3000 series to come back in stock. I think this would be a good enthusiast build and a great mid-range pc for gaming. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook lee_ellington ✭ June 1 I used this as an exercise in building the dream PC. This workhorse can handle heavy workloads or intense gaming easily! https://www.microcenter.com/site/content/custom-pc-builder-amd.aspx?load=172288b4-7a03-4820-b18c-800213d8cb0e 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Doggg ✭ June 1 This is a seriously powerful PC in a tiny case... high efficiency Ryzen CPU paired with a Noctua cooler means it will have plenty of headroom for a high wattage GPU. https://www.microcenter.com/site/content/custom-pc-builder-amd.aspx?load=608e42f9-4e9e-444f-9dea-176707fd9713 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Aram ✭ June 1 I went ahead and built an entry-level gaming rig. It's quite expensive but that mostly due to the inflated GPU and the mobo, prices weren't like this a couple of years ago. It represents that kind of build I am aiming for, I haven't upgraded my PC in about 8 years. I think it's a solid build that is up-to-date and will last for a long time. https://www.microcenter.com/site/content/custom-pc-builder.aspx?load=9ea7e503-b83d-41af-83b3-9b24ee6a41f9 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook gNkS7270 ✭ June 1 I didn't spare much expense here but it's not outlandish. Went AMD/Radeon all the way and you have to utilize the the PCIe Gen 4 because...well you just have to. Minimal RGB for this one as the ASUS Hero Dark just looks menacing. The 5950X and water cooled 6900XT should be future-proof for at least the next six months. I know the 011D has been done to death but it's the best case on the market on for a reason. As far as why this build is better, well, just look at it. https://www.microcenter.com/site/content/custom-pc-builder.aspx?load=1ac9a08c-4c1c-4543-8d91-ed2e12845e0c 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook BattleNub ✭ June 2 Just threw in everything https://www.microcenter.com/site/content/custom-pc-builder.aspx?load=4a0722a1-1f3e-49fe-a176-2961f46f7584 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Killshaw ✭ June 2 For me this is the best bang for your buck Entry level gaming pc. You would have enough computing power and multi tasking performance along with a graphics card to get you started off before saving up to upgrade. This system would be able to do streaming and video editing as well to help anyone get on their way to a streaming or content creator path. This in my opinion would be a fantastic starting build if you were wanting to get the most out of your budget. https://www.microcenter.com/site/content/custom-pc-builder.aspx?load=837308f0-cf68-43cf-bea9-f71d4ca97448 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Adam_M ✭ June 2 So I took the build you posted (as well as from the screenshot) and here is what I did: This is more of a budget-style build (since the current GPU market is insane) and essentially takes what was started with your build but I save some money in a few spots to upgrade the RAM and GPU. RGB is minimal, not going for aesthetics here, just price/performance. PSU is swapped and is about $10 more, but you get more wattage (for future upgrades) and Bronze grade, and semi-modular. CPU is swapped (based on screenshot photo) for a i5-10400 which is a very marginal downgrade over the 9700K and is a newer gen, but also saves us $40. MOBO is also swapped to save $40 but is the very capable Tomahawk. We also swap out the case, again less flashy but gets the job done at $20 less. Finally, we swap out the 1TB SSD for a 256 SSD for a boot drive, and a 1TB HDD. This saves us another $40. With that total of $130 save, we then upgrade the GPU AND the RAM. From 16GB to 32GB (need more Chrome tabs)??? And a 1650 to a 2060 for more gaming power. Now, these upgrades are about $200 more expensive, but so we end up with $70 more total, but overall the PC should perform MUCH better with triple-A titles and multi-tasking. https://www.microcenter.com/site/content/custom-pc-builder.aspx?load=8a0c4e89-37a7-4a7b-8dd3-5137ddbedf21 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook CHRISPR ✭ June 2 Purpose: scientific data analysis (python, java, R) [this means single threaded performance is basically all we need] Bare Minimums: 32GB ECC memory (yes, that's minimum for many of our workloads) Ryzen 3 APU (for ECC support, onboard graphics, and decent single threaded performance) 2x NVMe SSD's in RAID1 (redundancy is critical, NVMe is a nice to have) Other Parts: cheapest available (if it's from Microcenter I'm sure it won't spontaneously combust) https://www.microcenter.com/site/content/custom-pc-builder.aspx?load=43810d05-da6b-4f51-b04e-b0ca1dc324a7 Grand Total: $535.92 (based on by my build as a broke high school student that couldn't use the servers at the university I was interning at for all the analysis tools I needed) 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook matsui ✭ June 2 This is kind of a modest setup, but more of a gaming pc than compared to my macbook. https://www.microcenter.com/site/content/custom-pc-builder.aspx?load=86a415f4-25b6-4d0b-99da-6d6149bad5db 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Ncs ✭ June 2 My max performance, max rgb https://www.microcenter.com/site/content/custom-pc-builder.aspx?load=422a8900-df59-4245-9934-44a270d8c463 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook CaseRocker ✭ June 2 My goal was to make a modest build that wouldn't break the bank, but could handle some gaming and some chill streaming. https://www.microcenter.com/site/content/custom-pc-builder.aspx?load=00152ac9-8249-461b-a7c2-e495f086a299 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Emu ✭ June 2 I built this to last long time with me, great Video power for editing, fast SSD, full side tower to allow me upgrading in future. https://www.microcenter.com/site/content/custom-pc-builder.aspx?load=58a33db8-b111-4824-a349-a871fc9850c7 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook smalldude ✭ June 2 https://www.microcenter.com/site/content/custom-pc-builder.aspx?load=c57284ac-30c0-4b1b-a408-2a5eb34a043f Just try it out and see for yourself :p 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Kamren_Smith ✭ June 2 Went with a quad core i3 and a barebones motherboard for the budget. Managed to get 16 gigs of ram, at not rock bottom speeds. A cheap case, but not a Micro ATX case; those are nightmares to build in for your first build. A GTX 1650 is better than nothing. You could potentially go with just the integrated GPU, and hope that GPU prices fall; once the prices come back down, you could upgrade the GPU. A 500 gig SSD, would be plenty for a new person getting into PC's; you don't have to compromise with a regular Hard drive. https://www.microcenter.com/site/content/custom-pc-builder.aspx?load=76a8aa9d-0083-4a21-a0b1-d82ca75a4bca 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook kenwarf ✭ June 2 As everyone knows color LED's just help the data flow better, you may ding me on the CPU Cooler, but Noctura has the static pressure needed to keep her cool! The Data won't flow in the heat, so go with cooling... ❄️ Cooling ❄️ over 🎨 Color 🎨, it's a thing! ⚗️ The Science Is Real! ⚗️ https://www.microcenter.com/site/content/custom-pc-builder.aspx?load=f9b8b519-4cc6-486e-a0bf-4007d9beb893 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook RScar ✭ June 2 I chose all the components and RGB for my dream machine that I am already in the process of acquiring and building. It will take me a while on my budget, and I will have to compromise at several points, but this is pretty much the upper limit of my dreams. Could I go bigger? No, but I bet Linus could. https://www.microcenter.com/site/content/custom-pc-builder-amd.aspx?load=03cc7c1b-efb8-4fc1-b29f-f0b5807f7ed4 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook FragileRasputin ✭ June 2 I chosse this build hoping is the last time I need to explain to my wife I need to upgrade the computer. The Windows disc is needed for the scanner because setting up scanning in Linux is too easy these days, so I'll run it on a VM https://www.microcenter.com/site/content/custom-pc-builder.aspx?load=c65e6ec0-0ad5-4668-9288-3b79f652d2c4 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook «1…891011121314» This discussion has been closed. 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Services starting at $149.99 More Details Micro Center Homepage Desktops Laptops Computer Parts Computer Accessories Custom PC Builder Build Showcase Networking Electronics 3D Printing Service, Upgrades & Repairs Laptop Battery Replacement Laptop Screen Repair Virus and Malware Removal Hard Drive Recovery and Backup Apple MacBook Repair Custom Built PCs Schedule an Appointment © Vanilla Foundation Theme 2021 Powered By Vanilla Community Article [CLOSED] Share your PC Building Horror Story and enter to win a 3070 Graphics Card! - Page 10 — Micro Center Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker {$smarty.capture.menu} Activity Categories Discussions Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker Home › Contests › Past Contests [CLOSED] Share your PC Building Horror Story and enter to win a 3070 Graphics Card! «1…45678910» Comments Aditya ✭ January 31 A couple of years ago I had developed an interest in PC's and me being relatively cheap and not the brightest I thought that the websites where you could get the cheapest possible parts would be legit... Thus, I ran over to my dad and said that I found a graphics card for 25$. Yea 25$. My dad being in a call and thinking I had some sort of common sense brushed me aside and let me buy it. I ran up the stairs as fast as I could and went to the website and entered my pay pal info. Thus when I got the actual box it was already crushed and inside was something in a foreign language. I put it in my rig and the PC never turned on. This was the day I realized I was an idiot. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Doremon458 ✭ January 31 My uncle and I were driving to the store in a dark night to buy some computers part so he can teach me how to build a PC. We bought the stuff then drove home, we leave the parts there for tomorrow when we woke up the CPU box was gone we went to the living and it was on the ground tore open and the CPU was on....  my dog poop, while i was cleaning it i tripped and drop the CPU and its looks like 50% of the pins are gone or broken. Then i turned around and yes my dog was licking on the Graphics card that i put on the chair and he was about to chew it. IT was an Santana wind day so a lot of static electricity builds up on my dog and so he licked the motherboard and it shocked my poor dog and my new motherboard that i wanted that just went out of stock and so i have to wait every morning at 5 o clock to try to get a new one and thats my horrible PC build experiment thankyou for reading. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook jonbitzen ✭ January 31 Probably the worst build disaster I had was my first HTPC.  It was an intel atom-based motherboard with an embedded nVidia GPU.  I remember waiting for my parts, putting them all together, then hearing a pop from the brand-new power supply.  The power supply basically blew itself up and took the motherboard along with it.  It was no big deal to return everything, but it was all by mail and so it took some time to turn everything around, and meanwhile I was very frustrated. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook 2nrd ✭ January 31 2019, coming from soft tube watercooling, I decided to take the plunge and try hard tubing. I was terrified because the fittings works differently from soft tubing. It does not give you the feel of being as secure, but the o-rings in rigid tubing just simply works. After a week of planing my lines and gathering all the fittings needed, I went ahead and tested my luck. After hours and hours of bending and double-checking the fittings, I was confident in the lines and loop. The first hour of leak testing went great so I told myself, I'm good to go. Two days later, a small leak started to form. I didn't notice during the initial testing, but it was the outlet from the CPU fitting. While I was still running only distilled water, I thought I was still safe to just tighten it and continue running the PC. After one certain sixteen hour work day, I came home and booted up the PC. Didn't boot. Saw a little water stain on top of the backplate of my 1080ti. Turned off the PC and took apart the water block. Come to find out, the fitting was still leaking. The GPU was fried. Did the whole RMA process with EVGA. They replaced it with no questions. Ran the new GPU one week later. Ran the new GPU and a new fitting where the original was leaking. Everything was solid for 2 days. Another fitting was leaking from the upper radiator and fried the second GPU instantly. Of course, EVGA replaced that GPU with no questions as well. Replaced all the fittings with quality Bitspower fittings, previously ran XSPC fittings, and now I'm on my third 1080ti and no leaks for a solid 2 years. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook ChickadeePi ✭ January 31 I'm a generally clumsy person, and during my first build, I dropped both my HDD and 1060 five feet to the ground. Both parts ended up being alright, which was nice.   0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Yingdong ✭ January 31 edited January 31 My first time building a pc, I followed the pc building guides online steps by steps, hanging the board on case first, and spent roughly four hours to install everything on the pc. When I finished, I found there was an extra seemingly very important steel plate. It turned out to be the I/O backplate. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook cmac2k ✭ January 31 edited January 31 My last build was my first build, and it was a 386, so quite a ways back.  I've been waiting / hoping for my (now 10 year old) son to get interested enough to want to build his own.  That finally happened, like a month ago - great timing (not!) considering the challenges of finding a decent affordable GPU.  I know this is a common situation these days, but this qualifies as my PC build horror story.  He has had his heart set on a 3070, so we have our fingers crossed! 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook DigitalBoy ✭ February 1 edited February 1 I've been upgrading my old HP Elite tower that have Intel i7 by adding more memory, SSD drives, and better video card so I can do some video editing work.  I was hoping for RTX3060 or RTX3070 for my GPU to replace old Nvidia card that came with the system, but am able to get GTX1070 off from eBay due to GPU shortages.  It needs 8-pin power cable for video card and my system does not have it.  Also it came with 320W power supply!  What's more, it is proprietary and I cannot swap for a common ATX power supply.  So I have to be creative and came with a different approach.  I added a separate 12V, 300W power supply along with home made power control.  It came out nicely and video card works pretty good.  My system can handle any video cards up to 375W (300W add-on with 75W from PCIe slot).  Rule of thumb, always check and see if the system is capable of upgrading BEFORE buying the components! 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook bob_marley ✭ February 1 edited February 1 To preface this story, I've been an avid PC builder for many years now and I have also previously associated with miners during the great GPU shortage, and have been collecting PC parts for MANY MANY years. As long as I can remember, I've always loved working with computers and have always loved to help others as well. Throughout the years, I have built a number of computers with no issues for all my friends and family as well as some friends of friends. Never once have I experienced an issue that I couldn't fix with either Google or purchasing new parts, however, that decided to change during 2020 and 2021.   During 2020, when the pandemic first hit, I was extremely bored and had nothing to do with my time. As my workplace had been shutdown for a few months, and I was at home with no job during those months. I would often find myself wandering my house looking for something to do, when I would eventually remember that I loved to work on computers! And as quickly as I remembered, I would start building PC after PC. The first PC I had build was an older system, it had a 6700k with a Sabretooth Motherboard and 3 GTX 1070's in 3-way SLI, as a joke, the second PC I had built was a Ryzen 5 2600 with a B350M gaming pro motherboard paired with 64GB"s of ram, and the third PC I built was built from an 8700k with an RTX 2060 and 4gb's of ram. I would post all of these computers on my social media in order to get a kick out of it and was surprised to see that many of my friends had barely noticed that I have been building PC's for a while.   They would go on to get me to build many computers for them, ranging all budgets from $400 for a FULL set up, to a $4000PC, to even work on mining setups. Fast forward a few months around September. This is when I started experiencing issues with the computers I would build. The first PC I remember it occurring on was a Ryzen 5 3600 setup, with a B450 Aorus Pro Wifi, bought courteously from Microcenter, where I get all my parts . This PC in particular was being built for my neighbor and long time friend, as he knew I would build PC's and wanted me to build him one. Starting off on building the PC and I immediately experienced major issues, such as the PC not staying on. This would be from constant crashing/BSOD's. After days of troubleshooting, I eventually decided it was the ram after swapping out through 16 sticks of different DDR4 rams that I had as well as even getting a different motherboard, and CPU. The PC would finally let me install windows and I would be on my merry way. I finished the PC and would give it to him, with the hope that no more issues arise, alas, nothing lasts forever.   About a month later, my neighbor had come up to me and said his PC was constantly freezing and crashing, and asked me to take a look at it. I reluctantly took back the PC and started troubleshooting it. I replaced the CPU, GPU, Motherboard, RAM, PSU, Storage, everything; but would still have issues. "I have quite literally replaced everything but I'm still experiencing issues" I thought to myself. Stressed out of my mind, I gave up and gave him one of my computers of equivalent power and called it a day. This would only be the start of my issues. Soon after that incident, the PC miraculously started working again with no issues. This made me extremely pleased as I was sure the CPU was dead (even though it had been swapped out). Coincidentally, I was asked to build another PC for a friend that lived 30 minutes away. I built the PC using those parts and paired it with a 1070 and drove the 30 minutes to get there and the 30 minutes back.   After a few days of silence from him, I get a call. Dreading the worst, I pick up it and hear "The PC is crashing sometimes, can you come take a look at it sometime?" I had never felt so betrayed by a PC before, after so much care and love went into building one, it still refuses to work properly. It would take a total of three trips as well as a whole new AMD CPU for me to give up on that PC once again and provide him with a 7700k and a 1070 in order to just settle things. Following that encounter with the combo again, I gave the CPU and motherboard to my brother since he needed a PC, and I was curious to see if he would experience any issues. Turns out, the CPU ran perfectly fine, getting the boost clocks that it wanted as well as staying extremely cool.  This absolutely baffled me, as I was just watching him play games for hours without any issues. Irritated, I left and didn't bother to look at that PC for the next few weeks, when the RTX 3060TI came out. At this time, I was using another combo I had built which had consisted of a 9700f, which I had no issues with when I plugged in a GTX 1060 and 1070, never to experience an issue.  I had camped out for the card a whole 23 hours before opening and was successful in grabbing one, as well as my friend who was camped near me. When I got home, I immediately plugged it into my PC and started trying it out, benchmarking it and running all types of games.  That's when I noticed that I was lagging an awful ton and on games like Borderlands 3, the card was unable to run with DX12. Intrigued about what happened, I plugged the GPU into my friends PC with a 5600x and it ran perfectly fine, and grabbed his 3060TI and started experiencing the same thing. Not really wanting to deal with the issue, I decided it could've been a software or hardware issue so I immediately switched out everything to a different setup and it still ran horribly. I decided to switch it all back again into the 9700f build and decided that it was because XMP wasn't on, which was causing my stuttering. Upon turning on XMP, my PC BSOD'd and froze every time I would get into Windows. I switched out the ram to 3600 G.Skill ram that I had also acquired from MC and still the same issue. After hours of switching out parts and still leading to dead ends, I went to my brother's 3600 build and switched on XMP and plugged in the 3060TI, only for it to ruin the PC completely, causing a BSOD every time the PC turns on unless an underclock is applied to the CPU.  And now here to the present. Yesterday I went to go build my friend a PC, who lives 20 minutes away from where I live. I spent hours and hours on his new hardline cooled PC and everything was going smoothly. I finished the PC and went home, the following night, he texted me on discord and told me "My PC isn't working, I can't get into settings to turn on XMP." Somewhat relieved that his PC isn't broken, I told him we can fix that later and guided him to bios through the boot screen and guided him to enabling XMP. Not even seconds after the restart, he booted into windows and his screen BSOD'd. Going back into bios, I told him to change the speed and voltages and to double check the speed of his ram but it all checked out, yet there were issues of BSOD'ing. We settled on reinstalling windows and it works with no issues now, except for the fact that we refuse to touch that horrendous "XMP Profile" button. What came to haunt me months ago is still haunting me to this day. Oh and an old friend of mine also bought a used 980 ti and I plugged it into my PC only for it to fry and catch literal fire. Killed that horrendous 3600 finally. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook SolPsiona ✭ February 1 This was actually fairly recent. I was building my PC and was getting everything plugged in and set up. And for the very first time I was able to get the computer to post, and actually get into the bios and the main windows login. Because I checked the bios after logging in and getting some bench testing done I seen that my CPU was running really hot. So I checked it and decided I would put in a cooler I got at the store! So I had a bit of difficulty getting this new CPU cooler in and when I finally was able to get it seated and plugged everything back in. I was not able to get it to post at al! I tried replacing the motherboard and made sure everything was plugged in correctly. And nothing was working. So the next day two days I kept trying to figure out why it was not posting and had the great idea to check the bottom of the CPU. To my surprise I found the CPU thingy's were bent! In my installing of the new Cooler. I bent the CPU pins! I was so mad at myself for that. After I figured that out, I had it replaced and was able to get everything up and running again.  0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook JustinHoey ✭ February 1 I was changing the cooler on my Ryzen, got all the screws and retention bar off, and then pulled. And pulled again, and nothing was budging. So I pulled reaaally hard and lifted a corner of it and got it to separate. Only one small problem: the CPU got stuck to the cooler and was ripped out of the retaining bracket, and in the process I bent four rows of pins and snapped one off. I bent them all back with a screwdriver and credit card over the course of three hours, and thankfully it still works. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook RetroTech ✭ February 1 edited February 1 Anyone ever walk into their home to be greeted by the distant sounds of short circuiting electronics? I have! Picture it - Austin, 2006... Upon investigating the somewhat alarming sounds, I discovered they were originating from my PC which I had just earlier in the day migrated over to a new case. I thought, “hrmmm, a connector must’ve come loose,” and I was just home for a brief minute so I simply unplugged the unit from the mains. Well, a day or two later when I got around to checking out the PC to figure what was wrong, I discovered when removing the side panel that my components had been given a nice cold bath! Yup - a puddle of water greeted me. Turns out, a certain person whom had just earned a new title, “EX” - decided to pour a cup of water through the fan located at the top rear of the case. Alas, this was one of the most magnificent displays of his endearing, *ahem* - “young and dumb” qualities. Needless to say, all the components were fried and the couple of hours I spent transferring the components from the old case to the new one was just to give them a deserving send-off in a beautiful new case! At least the case wasn’t harmed and was able to welcome a new build a few years later. PS - the EX went on to steal his deceased father’s identity and ended up in jail, or so I was later told. Really made my wet computer seem like an innocent accident! XD 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook «1…45678910» This discussion has been closed. 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Is there a way I can fix this or do I have to bring this back to the store for service? 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Comments Ian admin January 2 blueblur77 said: I've only had this computer for about 2 weeks and now it is shutting down and rebooting whenever I am streaming Dead by Daylight. I am seeing that this is an with this model in this forum. Is there a way I can fix this or do I have to bring this back to the store for service? Greetings, Are you getting any blue screens or anything? Any error messages?  0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook blueblur77 ✭ January 2 No, I haven't gotten any blue screens. The computer just shuts down, I hear buzzing from my headphones, and the computer reboots as if nothing happened. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook LandShark admin January 4 Hi @blueblur77, could you please check the Event Viewer to see what may be causing these restarts? Right-click on the Start button and select Control Panel > System & Security and double-click Administrative Tools. Then double-click Event Viewer. Are there any Critical or Error logs after your computer restarts on its own? 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook georgem3 ✭ January 4 I have the Powerspec g464 and it does the exact same thing. Had about 1-2 weeks. Black screens and instareboots the PC or shuts down entirely when playing any video game. Anything requiring the GPU it seems. The g464 does this for me, and I have already swapped in the Powerspec g358 for the exact same reason. Black screens as soon as any game starts. Look at the reviews for these 2 PCs on the microcenter store. Many people are having this issue with the Powerspec computers but none of the microcenter representatives seem to be aware of it. Not sure if I should return the PC or try and get it "repaired" since the repairs I've seen done by the repair shop has not fixed this issue. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook LandShark admin January 4 edited January 4 @georgem3 I'd love to know if your computer is showing any Critical errors as well! Since you mentioned that you think yours is specifically to do with the GPU, have you tried reinstalling the GPU drivers? Our service department would be able to take a look at your desktop as well if you would prefer! Would you mind checking to see what your BIOS version is? You can use MSinfo32 to verify this information.  0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook georgem3 ✭ January 4 @LandShark Thanks for your response. No critical errors (meaning text errors that show up on the crash?). The screen just goes black and the PC reboots. I just tried updating to the latest AMD drivers (dated 11/30/20) and it crashed still. While the random crashes are unpredictable, the PC reliably crashes if I jump into a video game quickly after booting up. The games it has crashed during League of Legends (crashed once), which is not intensive, and Grim Dawn, made in 2016, so intensive-ish but not crazy. The BIOS version is American Megatrends Inc. 2607, 8/14/2020 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook LandShark admin January 4 Sorry, my request was a bit confusing. Are you seeing any logs in the Event Viewer under the Critical Errors tab? You can open this window by typing "Event Viewer" in the Start menu My system shows 0 below. I'm hoping your system may show some answers. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook LandShark admin January 4 Are you able to try testing the desktop in a different outlet, power cable, or circuit? 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook georgem3 ✭ January 4 Here are the critical errors. Plenty of non-critical ones as well. As for the different outlet and power cable, I can make this happen, though not now. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook LandShark admin January 4 From that information, it looks like it's an unexpected shutdown. Let's try testing the power and then see if we can find any difference there. Another option would be to boot your PC in safe mode. This would check to see if it's a driver compatibility issue. If the issue doesn't reappear when you start your PC in safe mode, you can eliminate the default settings, basic device drivers, and services as possible causes. Looking forward to your response. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook blueblur77 ✭ January 5 This is a capture of my event viewer.  0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook blueblur77 ✭ January 5 edited January 5 I've been getting the kernel power critical error after every shut down.  0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook TSTDavey admin January 6 @blueblur77 just chiming in. The Critical Kernel power error just means windows unexpectedly shutdown. Have you tried @LandShark suggestions of attempting to go into safe mode and see if windows boots from there and does not reboot like what you've been experiencing? Here is a link of how to get into safe mode from the Windows Login screen using the Shift Key + selecting restart from the power on and off icon with the mouse cursor. Link: https://support.avira.com/hc/en-us/articles/360002870214-How-do-I-start-Windows-10-in-Safe-Mode-  LandShark said: From that information, it looks like it's an unexpected shutdown. Let's try testing the power and then see if we can find any difference there. Another option would be to boot your PC in safe mode. This would check to see if it's a driver compatibility issue. If the issue doesn't reappear when you start your PC in safe mode, you can eliminate the default settings, basic device drivers, and services as possible causes. Looking forward to your response. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook georgem3 ✭ January 6 I had microcenter swap out the graphics card with an ROG amd 5700xt and the crashing issue has not shown up yet. I believe it may have fixed it. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook blueblur77 ✭ January 7 I have booted up the computer in Safe Mode and everything ran as normal. I tried to stream Call of Duty: Cold War and the system crashed almost immediately. It seems to only happen when I attempt to stream a game. Later today, after work I will try I different outlet to see if that will change anything. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook TSTDavey admin January 7 @blueblur77 it could be an issue with the RX 5700 in the G464. We will be emailing you to get more information from you on your powerspec. We can give you options. Look out for the email. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook mikeil84 ✭ January 28 @TSTDavey I have the same machine and same issue.  What are the other options?  Can we swap out the 5700xt for something else that is more stable?  I am clearly not the only one with this problem.  I just bought the desktop last Sunday. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook LandShark admin January 28 Hello @mikeil84 I've emailed you about this concern. We'd be happy to work with you on this to figure out what may be causing this issue. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook mikeil84 ✭ January 28 @LandShark the replies you have given me are to reinstall windows and try updating windows and drivers. Neither have/would help this as it is a new desktop within the last week. I already tried updating windows, the bios and the gpu drivers because it was crashing. What can be done to rectify this faulty machine? 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook TSMichaelB admin January 28 mikeil84 said: @LandShark the replies you have given me are to reinstall windows and try updating windows and drivers. Neither have/would help this as it is a new desktop within the last week. I already tried updating windows, the bios and the gpu drivers because it was crashing. What can be done to rectify this faulty machine? I am sorry to hear about your crashing, @mikeil84. I work alongside our PowerSpec engineering team and would love to work with you to get to the bottom of this. I know the original post in this thread specified that the system itself was shutting down/rebooting, is yours doing the same thing exactly? Or do you notice any other symptoms? While they may appear to be similar issues on the surface, it's possible that the underlying issue may differ to some degree and require a different resolution. If you can provide answers to the following questions, it would help me isolate what we may be dealing with in regards to your issue: When the crashing occurs, does anything happen to the screen? Is it a static image? A flat black screen? Green screen? What do you see the moment this happens? When this occurs, do you still get anything coming from your audio? Gameplay, music, buzzing noises, anything that may designate that the system is still powered on during the crash? Does the frequency of the crash change at all, or does it occur at a similar rate each time? IE: Always crashes after 5 minutes, or is it random? We should be able to narrow down the type of crashing you're experiencing when we have those answers. As far as your options go, you do still have quite a few options on the table. While I'd hate to see you inconvenienced by having to make a trip to the store, you are still well within the return period for the unit and I am confident your local Micro Center team would take care of you in terms of getting that unit exchanged. That same option also gives our service department the opportunity to check the unit in and diagnose the cause of the crash. The other options are similar to what I am attempting to accomplish in this thread, which is technical support troubleshooting, which can be viewed as the more convenient option, especially if it is as cold in your area as it is here in Ohio. This can be done here on our community forum, via text, phone, email or chat. The manner you choose depends entirely on your preference. If you do prefer to exchange the unit, please let us know as I'd like to reach out to your local store and prep them for your arrival to make it as convenient as possible.  0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook mikeil84 ✭ January 28 @TSMichaelB the screen goes black like there is no input for a second or two.  Then the computer reboots. Sound seems to cut out at the same time. It usually crashes when starting a game. I have had success playing for hours, but not consistently. Error codes in the event viewer show "WHEA-LOGGER" as the source and event ID 18.  Fatal hardware error occurred. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook TSMichaelB admin January 28 mikeil84 said: @TSMichaelB the screen goes black like there is no input for a second or two.  Then the computer reboots. Sound seems to cut out at the same time. It usually crashes when starting a game. I have had success playing for hours, but not consistently. Error codes in the event viewer show "WHEA-LOGGER" as the source and event ID 18.  Fatal hardware error occurred. Thank you for the information, that is certainly interesting. WHEA errors can be difficult to dial in on because they can stem from random driver issues (even ones completely unrelated to the hardware at fault) to legitimate hardware failure. I've personally had message signal interrupts from a network adapter cause WHEA errors that crashed my old 1080 Ti... Definitely one of the more tricky errors. Since this is persisting after you've updated Windows, your BIOS and drivers, it's safe to assume you have no persisting overclocks or tweaks that may be causing any WHEA errors.  I hate to ask this, but do you mind changing a setting and then attempt to see if you can force it to crash again? I would like to disable automatic system restarts on system failure. To do this, press WIN + R to create a Run prompt, and type "SystemPropertiesAdvanced.exe". Click OK. Next, click the "Settings" button under Startup and Recovery. Under the System Failure category, uncheck "Automatically Restart". Click OK. Afterwards, do what you normally do that induces the crash and see if the system attempts to automatically restart itself. I am curious to see if the hard fault is listening to the OS when it automatically restarts, or if something with the hardware itself is locking it up. If it remains locked up when this option is disabled, it points more towards this being driver related as the crash is waiting on the OS to initiate the restart, and it's logging the failure as evidenced by your WHEA-LOGGER error, something a traditional hard-fault typically can't do. This would actually be good news, as it would point towards something we can actually address, though I'll be honest with you, I am currently at a bit of a loss as to what may be triggering this exact crash for you. That said, I am willing to work with you until we both figure it out. You've done a large portion of the ground work already by ruling out the OS version, BIOS and GPU driver, so now we can look elsewhere. I would personally start with background applications that are requesting GPU hardware acceleration (Discord, Chrome/Edge/Firefox, Steam, Epic Games Launcher, Battlenet, etc). If you can disable hardware acceleration in these applications or avoid running them in the background during your tests to see if it has any impact on the frequency of your crashing, it might give us a better idea as to what is triggering it.  From here, the best course of action would be tackling specific input methods and features (HDMI vs DP, FreeSync vs no-VRR, windowed vs borderless vs fullscreen, etc) to see if a specific manner in which your hardware is being used is triggering the crash.  I'll keep an eye on this thread and work with you to help figure this out.  0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook mikeil84 ✭ January 28 @TSMichaelB It still crashed after changing the settings under system failure. I don't have steam or anything installed. This happens with only modern warfare running. I have the monitor plugged in with display port. The monitor doesn't have an HDMI out. The only app running in the background was battlenet. I closed it this time and it still crashed 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook TSMichaelB admin January 29 mikeil84 said: @TSMichaelB It still crashed after changing the settings under system failure. I don't have steam or anything installed. This happens with only modern warfare running. I have the monitor plugged in with display port. The monitor doesn't have an HDMI out. The only app running in the background was battlenet. I closed it this time and it still crashed With that setting disabled, does the system continue to restart on its own? Or does it now stay in a crashed state (black screen, frozen image, etc)? If it is continuing to restart itself after changing that setting, we are likely dealing with a hardware failure after all that is forcing the system to reboot. If it is no longer rebooting, it means whatever was causing the crash was waiting for the OS to issue the reboot, which means there is a possibility that it can be addressed via drivers or through various settings tweaks. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook mikeil84 ✭ January 29 @TSMichaelB I read in forums that disabling fast boot has helped others with this gpu. I attempted to disable that without any success. With the automatic restart on system failure disabled, nothing changed. It still restarts at the same point of failure.  0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook TSMichaelB admin January 29 mikeil84 said: @TSMichaelB I read in forums that disabling fast boot has helped others with this gpu. I attempted to disable that without any success. With the automatic restart on system failure disabled, nothing changed. It still restarts at the same point of failure.  That is unfortunate news, and may confirm your initial concerns regarding it being hardware. The real question is going to be, which piece of hardware is at fault... You mentioned earlier that event viewer was showing WHEA-LOGGER with ID 18, did it specify which component reported the error? Typically you'd see:  "A fatal hardware error has occurred. Reported by component: Processor Core" In this example, we would know that the CPU is reporting the error, and that it is likely at fault for the crashing. That isn't to say that a different failing component could be at fault and it could mask itself as a different component reporting the error, but it is far more likely to be the component that is originally reporting the error. We could go through various steps to confirm whether the CPU is at fault (underclocking, undervolting, disabling cores/SMT, etc) however I do not want to subject you to the massive time sink required to undertake this, nor should you have to go through this on a brand new computer in the first place. While my curiosity wants to learn exactly why this system is failing, at this point it is likely best that we coordinate with your local store and get you an exchange in as convenient of a manner as we can, and let our service associates determine the root cause of the crashing and address it themselves. That said, if you'd prefer to go this route, I am willing to put in the effort with you. Just understand that it likely won't lead to a solution, just a confirmation of the issue at hand.  0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook mikeil84 ✭ January 29 It said the processor reported it.  0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook TSMichaelB admin January 29 mikeil84 said: It said the processor reported it.  This makes sense, and eludes to what I was mentioning earlier. Now, there could be several causes that would result in the processor reporting it. The CPU has an integrated memory controller (IMC) and memory issues can still result in the CPU reporting a failure, so that is one potential avenue. The CPU also provides the PCIe lanes to your graphics card, so while a GPU may crash, the system may interpret it as the processor having a WHEA failure instead. These two scenarios are far less likely though, which brings me to the more likely option. Failing CPU core/cache topology.  The cause behind why this is failing could be a number of things, but in my past experience, these types of failures typically stem from overclocking gone awry. A little too much SOC voltage or a dramatic spike in VCORE with current limitations removed can cause all sorts of adverse side effects, and this type of instability can be one of them. Seeing as your system was sold as an open box unit, it's entirely possible that the previous owner may have dabbled with overclocking or other tinkering and the crashing only manifests under specific loads, which is why it wasn't caught during our return check-in testing. This is especially tedious when it's brought about by the use of specific instruction sets or changes from certain load levels. Regardless, you do have a couple of options on the table. The first option would be to bring it in to your local Micro Center store and have the service department diagnose & repair the unit. While I am fairly confident with our troubleshooting efforts that we are seeing a processor failure, I also do not want to rule out a board failure as well (failure in the socket or VRM power delivery could also manifest in this type of crash), and I'd rather you avoid having to make multiple trips to the store if necessary, especially with the current weather conditions. We offer a 48 hour repair guarantee on PowerSpec systems, but I imagine they'd have it done far quicker than this, that's just the upper max limit on routine repairs. The second option would be an exchange, though this option comes with a bit of bad news. Looking through your local Micro Center's inventory, I do not see any comparable PowerSpec systems around the price you paid for the G464, and our G464 has been phased out due to its age. The PowerSpec G508 would be a downgrade in every capacity, and even the Dell gaming systems we sell at a similar price wouldn't match the performance you were offered at the price point you paid, and it looks like we do not have any G358's in-stock in your area.  If you are looking to exchange, it may result in a compromise in performance or value, and you may find that unacceptable. Given the circumstances, I can reach out to your local Micro Center's management team and explain the situation on your behalf to see what options are available for you, especially considering how helpful you've been in diagnosing this system remotely and potentially helping others that may come across a similar issue. At the end of the day, my job is to make sure that you are taken care of. Whether that results in your continued support of the PowerSpec brand, or making sure you receive a comparable system of another brand, as long as you are satisfied in the end, I'll be happy. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Categories 6.7K All Categories 1K The Blog 36 What's Trending 164 How to & Technical Guides 10 Computer Hardware 119 Software 3 Home Office 6 Networking Audio/Visual 2 Home Automation 15 3D Printers 9 Maker 15 PC Build Guides 81 Reviews & Buying Guides 27 Build Showcase 13 Contests 35 Past Contests 823 The Community 1.7K General Discussion 105 New Members 87 Consumer Tech 27 Prebuilt PCs and Laptops 75 Software 2 Audio/Visual 12 Networking & Security 1 Home Automation 2 Digital Photography 3 Content Creators 21 Hobby Boards & Projects 23 3D Printing 49 Retro Arcade/Gaming 80 All Other Tech 1.2K Store Information and Policy 49 Off Topic 5 Community Ideas & Feedback 111 Your Completed Builds 2.6K Build-Your-Own PC 1.7K Help Choosing Parts 220 Graphics Cards 161 CPUs, Memory, and Motherboards 61 Cases and Power Supplies 19 Air and Liquid Cooling 13 Monitors and Displays 29 Peripherals 9 All Other Parts 21 Featured Categories We love seeing what our customers build Submit photos and a description of your PC to our build showcase Submit Now Looking for a little inspiration? See other custom PC builds and get some ideas for what can be done View Build Showcase View builds by: AMD Processors Intel Processors RTX 3090 RTX 3080 RTX 2080 Ti RTX 2080 Super RTX 2070 Super RTX 2070 RTX 2060 Super Radeon RX 5700XT Radeon RX 5700 Air Cooled Liquid Cooled SAME DAY CUSTOM BUILD SERVICE If You Can Dream it, We Can Build it. Services starting at $149.99 More Details Micro Center Homepage Desktops Laptops Computer Parts Computer Accessories Custom PC Builder Build Showcase Networking Electronics 3D Printing Service, Upgrades & Repairs Laptop Battery Replacement Laptop Screen Repair Virus and Malware Removal Hard Drive Recovery and Backup Apple MacBook Repair Custom Built PCs Schedule an Appointment © Vanilla Foundation Theme 2021 Powered By Vanilla Community Article A Beginner's Guide to Live Streaming — Micro Center Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker {$smarty.capture.menu} Activity Categories Discussions Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker Home › Reviews & Buying Guides A Beginner's Guide to Live Streaming TSTonyV admin July 2020 edited February 16 in Reviews & Buying Guides Hello! Welcome to the Micro Center Community. As you may have already seen, we put a post together on Live Streaming Equipment, but the equipment doesn’t do you any good if you don’t use it. Quite a few of you out there want to build a computer both for streaming, so today I’ll give you a proper live-stream setup guide. This is about the software side of things (with a little PC hardware thrown in). Table of Contents: Introduction and the Basics Getting Started Upload speeds, bitrate, and what resolution and framerate to stream in Streaming Encoders/Hardware vs. Software Encoding Finishing Setup  Quick note: this guide is written under the impression you're using PC for gaming and streaming at the same time. If you want to use or build a PC dedicated for only streaming, then game on another PC or a console, that changes things a bit with regards to your hardware requirements/capabilities.  0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Comments TSTonyV admin July 2020 edited May 18 Introduction and the Basics Streaming Software Before anything else, we obviously need to cover some basics for streaming. First, you need to use some sort of streaming software that allows you to broadcast to a service of your choice. Popular software programs include: Open Broadcaster Software (OBS) Streamlabs OBS Xsplit There are more besides these, but these are some of the most well-known and widely used.  Most popular streaming software will have the same basic set of features for encoding and capturing different audio and video sources. Once you’re past those, they’ll have different features that allow you to customize your stream. Streamlabs, for example, integrates a lot of features for stream notifications, alerts, chat interaction features, and such that OBS doesn’t have. This guide will focus on the basics that are applicable for any live-streaming software, not the extras, which will be influenced by personal preference.  You also need to know what streaming service you’d like to use. The service is the actual website you’d be streaming to, e.g., Twitch.tv, YouTube, and Facebook Live. Each service has different features and options that may make them more or less appealing for you. Most video game streamers like to stream on Twitch or YouTube, Twitch being the more popular option. I’d recommend doing some research to decide which one you’d like to use the most.  A quick note about PC hardware for streaming One quick statement about PC hardware as it relates to streaming: you don’t need a crazy powerful system to live stream. PC hardware has gotten to a point where even budget gaming systems are quite capable of streaming at decent settings.  If you have a PC that can play the games you want, you can probably stream them. If you’re not streaming games but something more like a talk show, podcast, or something else along those lines, your hardware requirements will be even lighter. That said, if you’re trying to push a really high-quality stream, you’ll want quality hardware, but I’ll get into this a bit more later. Last, this guide is written under the assumption that you'd be gaming/streaming from a single system. For a dual-PC setup, the recommendations and requirements would be a little different.  With all that out of the way, let’s get to it! 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook TSTonyV admin July 2020 edited May 18 Getting Started For our purposes, I’ll be giving examples with Open Broadcast Software (OBS). It’s free, open-source, and is one of the most popular streaming programs. After downloading your streaming software, your first step is opening up the settings menu and linking your account. Most software should allow you to either sign into and link your account for your chosen service or use a stream key obtainable from your account. In OBS, it’s on the top-left where you can click File, then Settings. Under Settings, the Stream category is where you can link your account for your chosen streaming service. You should be able to log in to link the account or utilize a Stream Key you can obtain directly from your account’s profile.  Once your account is linked, the next two areas we’re concerned with are Video and Output.  The Video category is pretty simple. Base (Canvas) Resolution will be the resolution you’re using on your monitor, so if you have a 1080p monitor, you set it to 1920x1080. Output (Scaled) Resolution is the resolution you’re broadcasting to viewers, and Common FPS Values is where you set the framerate you’re broadcasting to viewers.  The Output category has a few more settings, but the main ones we’re concerned with are Video Bitrate and Encoder. When you’re streaming, the encoder is what actually processes and converts the video data to be uploaded to your stream service. Bitrate determines the amount of data/bandwidth you’re actually using while uploading to your stream. You can leave the rest of the settings at default to start with.  Figuring out how to properly configure these settings is a bit of a long discussion, so let’s get into it. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook TSTonyV admin July 2020 edited May 18 Upload speeds, bitrate, and choosing what resolution and framerate to stream in First things first, we need to go over the importance of your network connection, specifically your upload speeds. Whenever you’re streaming, you’re uploading data over your internet. What kind of upload speeds you have will be the first factor in determining what resolution/framerate you can stream in.  Streaming at higher resolutions/framerates will take up more bandwidth, and if you don’t have enough bandwidth, your stream will suffer from dropped frames and stuttering. You should be able to check upload speeds with your internet service provider or a service like speedtest.net. Upload speeds will typically be measured in megabits per second (Mbps).  Each streaming service will have recommendations for a certain bitrate at a given resolution and framerate. Bitrate is measured in kilobits per second, and one megabit = 1000 kilobits. So, if you have an upload speed of 10Mbps, your max bitrate would be 10000. When setting your bitrate, it’s recommended to set it at something a little lower than your max upload speed because you won’t always have your full bandwidth available. Here are some general recommendations for bitrate at common resolutions/framerates.  Of course, you should always double-check the recommendations for your service. For Twitch and Youtube, you can refer to these links: Recommended Encoding Settings for Streaming on Twitch Recommended Encoding Settings for Streaming on YouTube When trying to determine what resolution/framerate you should use, there are some other things you should consider besides your upload speed as well: First, consider the type of content you’re streaming. “High-motion” content (content with lots of camera movement like first-person shooters and action games) is harder to compress, so in order to maintain image quality, you need to use a higher bitrate. Low motion content (static content like card games and turn-based strategy games, ones without a lot of camera movement) will be less sensitive to framerate and not require the same bitrate to maintain image quality. For example, streaming Counter Strike at 720p/60FPS, you may need to set your bitrate to 4500 or 5000 to keep your image quality good, whereas if you're streaming a card game like Hearthstone at the same settings, you could go with 3500, maybe less, while still having good image quality. Just remember that if you go too low, you'll start getting artifacts/pixelation on your stream, and it will be hard to see what's going on.  Second, you need to consider the viewer on the other end. If you’re streaming at high bitrates, they have to be able to download the same amount. If they have a poor connection, the stream will stutter and buffer frequently. Streaming services have quality settings that viewers can select to change quality if they’re having trouble watching, but depending on your streaming service, those aren’t always available*. Viewers may be watching on smaller screens (like using the Twitch app on their mobile devices) or may not be in full-screen. Considering that streaming at 1080p or higher resolution may not really improve their experience and could hamper it if they don't have the speeds to handle it. *This is an advantage to streaming on YouTube, which provides these quality settings for all streamers. If you’re streaming on Twitch, quality settings are only guaranteed for partners. Third, you do have to consider your computer hardware. Even if you have a really good internet connection, you can overtax your system if your settings are too high. Dropped frames, pixelation/artifacts on the stream, performance loss in-game on your end, there’s a lot of ways these issues could present themselves.  Personally, I would recommend starting with 720p/30FPS, or if you have the bandwidth for it, 720p/60FPS or 1080p/30FPS. This should be a good overall balance of quality, bandwidth requirements, and not over-taxing system resources. If you find that you’re having performance issues, you can lower your settings accordingly. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook TSTonyV admin July 2020 edited May 18 Streaming Encoders There are two types of encoders you can choose from: software or hardware. Each one has certain advantages and disadvantages depending on your setup. Software Encoding Software encoding utilizes your CPU for the encoding. Software encoding tends to like having more cores/threads, and once upon a time, you really needed an Intel i7 processor if you wanted good quality software encoding, but today even budget CPUs like the i5-10400 are packing in more cores/threads than old i7’s did. Because of this, software encoding is much more accessible.  When selecting the x264 software encoder in your streaming program, you’ll also need to select a speed for the encoding. It will default to “veryfast,” and there are a number of settings ranging from “slower” all the way up to “ultrafast.” Slower settings produce higher image quality at the cost of more CPU resources. It’s recommended to stay somewhere between medium and veryfast: any slower or faster, and the tradeoff with quality or performance generally isn’t worth it. x264 medium is kind of the "gold standard" in terms of quality. Newer mid and high-end CPUs (like the Ryzen 5600X or Intel i7-11700k) can handle x264 medium or fast; budget and low-end CPUs are typically more suitable for x264 faster or veryfast.  Depending on how much CPU overhead you have, the performance impact can vary quite a bit. If you have a really high-end CPU like a Ryzen 9 5900X, you could even encode at x264 slow with little to no performance loss. But if you have something more modest, there can be a noticeable impact depending on the games you play and the settings you use. You'll need to play around with your settings to find the right balance.  Hardware Encoding Hardware encoding will utilize your GPU for the encoding process. NVIDIA’s NVENC encoder on their 1600, 2000, and 3000 series cards is generally considered to produce about the same image quality as x264 medium at default settings. 10-series and 900-series NVIDIA cards have older versions of the NVENC encoder, which are not as good quality as the latest version but can still work well.  Unlike software encoding, hardware encoding actually uses a separate, dedicated chip on your GPU. What this means is that the performance impact to your system will be minimal as you won't be using up your CPU resources and will use little to no GPU resources. When selecting NVENC in your streaming program, it will default to the “Quality” setting. If you enable advanced encoding settings, you can also choose Max Quality, which will improve image quality at the cost of resources, or Performance, which will reduce image quality in favor of better performance.  Quality is recommended for most users. Max Quality can have issues in situations where your GPU is fully maxed out, and it's only a minor quality improvement, and most users' performance will be good enough that you don't have to go any lower than Quality anyway.  For more information about the NVENC encoder and how to set it up properly, you can refer to NVIDIA’s NVENC OBS Guide. AMD’s video cards also have hardware encoding, however, it’s known to have some issues related specifically to live streaming that makes it difficult to get good quality; it's not recommended to use it for live streaming.  Which encoder should I use? I want to emphasize that there isn’t one single correct answer. Depending on your unique setup, one may be better than the other. Test things out, experiment, try both and figure out what works best for you. It’s a balancing act that you have to dial in with trial and error. That said, here are my general recommendations to get started: If you have a newer NVIDIA card, try hardware first, even if you have a really good CPU. For most people, hardware encoding with the new NVENC encoder will work perfectly, and you can basically just set it, forget it, and you’ll have a good quality stream. If you're limited on CPU resources, even with an older NVIDIA card, try hardware first. If you have issues with performance, you can try lowering your settings or switching to software encoding.  If you have an AMD card, or an older NVIDIA card with a decent CPU, try software first. Even if you have a newer NVIDIA card, if your CPU is good enough, you can use x264 at medium with very little performance loss, if any at all. If you are over-taxing your CPU and losing performance, you can raise the encoding speed or try switching to hardware encoding.  Also, don’t forget that it’s not just the encoder: your resolution, framerate, and bitrate go hand-in-hand with the encoder, and you’ll have to adjust those settings as well. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook TSTonyV admin July 2020 edited May 18 Finishing Setup The last and easiest step I’ll cover for live-streaming is adding sources to your stream. Sources are what will actually be displayed to the viewer on your stream. It’ll be on the main window for OBS on the bottom left. To add a source, you click the + icon.   Once you click the +, you’ll be presented with a list of options for different types of sources you can add: Video Capture Device is what you’ll choose if you’re adding a webcam or a capture card.  Display Capture will capture whatever is displaying on your monitor Game Capture will specifically capture any games that are open.  Window Capture can capture other windows and applications.  You can use the others as needed if you wish, but these will be the only ones you need starting off. The sources will display on your stream in the order you have them listed from top to bottom (e.g., if your webcam is at the top of the list, it will be displayed in front of the other sources like games). You can move them around as needed. You can also reposition and adjust the size of your sources in the preview window, which shows exactly how your stream will look to viewers.  Your software should automatically use your default audio device and microphone to capture sound from your computer. If you find that one is too loud or quiet, you can adjust the volume with the slider under each device.  Once that’s all done, the only thing left to do is start streaming! Initially, you’ll probably have to play around with your settings to find what works best. Unfortunately, you can’t adjust these settings in real time: you’ll have to restart the stream to change settings. But once everything is dialed in, you’ll pretty much be set! Let us know if you have any questions or feedback in the comments below! Other Useful Links: OBS Troubleshooting Guides Twitch.tv Getting Started Guide for Live Streaming How to Pick and Choose Parts for a Custom-Built PC 1 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook SlowRoddo ✭ August 2020 Fantastic write up! 1 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook TSTonyV admin August 2020 SlowRoddo said: Fantastic write up! Thank you very much! I spent a good amount of time on this and I hope it's helpful for anybody who's looking to get into streaming.  0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook SlowRoddo ✭ August 2020 TSTonyV said: Thank you very much! I spent a good amount of time on this and I hope it's helpful for anybody who's looking to get into streaming.  My, almost, 10 year old is working towards buying a few key hardware pieces necessary to stream his Fortnite and Minecraft games. I've been needing to do some research into what's required on the PC side. Nice to have a "one-stop shop" for the hardware and the know-how.  0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook P_R ✭ September 2020 Hello, I had a question. So I I have a PS4 and wanted to start streaming on twitch. I bought a camera, microphone, and elgato. The problem I’m having is the laptop I have can’t support the stream. Now I wanted to know about getting a pc that will allow me to stream. I don’t want to Game on my PC I just want to stream from it for the moment and possible maybe later upgrading so I could play on the PC. I just wanted to know my options if possible? I’m new to all this tech stuff 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook TSTonyV admin September 2020 P_R said: Hello, I had a question. So I I have a PS4 and wanted to start streaming on twitch. I bought a camera, microphone, and elgato. The problem I’m having is the laptop I have can’t support the stream. Now I wanted to know about getting a pc that will allow me to stream. I don’t want to Game on my PC I just want to stream from it for the moment and possible maybe later upgrading so I could play on the PC. I just wanted to know my options if possible? I’m new to all this tech stuff If you're just wanting to build a streaming-only PC and play games on a different device, it's actually pretty easy. A modest budget gaming system can be used as dedicated streaming PC, and because you're using the PC for streaming only, that allows you to actually push a nice high quality stream even with "cheaper" hardware, because streaming on its own isn't too taxing on your system.  If you want a dedicated streaming PC, I would recommend getting a Ryzen 3 3300X or Ryzen 5 3600 (depending on availability) and pairing that with a GTX 1650 Super. The 3300X/3600 are fantastic processors on a budget that will have plenty of overhead to utilize a large number of assets on the stream itself, and the 1650 Super gives you access to the newest NVENC encoder, and because you're gaming on a separate system we don't have to worry about the drawbacks I mentioned with pushing your GPU to the max and losing performance. If you want to actually build a streaming PC, you could do something like this: https://www.microcenter.com/site/content/custom-pc-builder.aspx?load=abfc558d-f989-4b78-8a64-a63342878de0 Bonus points for the fact that if you decided you wanted to get into PC gaming at some point, this system would be a solid budget gaming build and allow you some upgrade options down the road.  Depending on what kind of budget you'd have for a dedicated streaming PC there are ways to work things around and save some cost in certain areas, like a smaller SSD if you're not planning on keeping anything on the system or snagging a slightly cheaper CPU, but the 1650 Super is a must have in my opinion because of how good NVENC is for encoding.  The last piece of the puzzle is a capture card, to actually capture and feed the gameplay from your console into the computer to be streamed. There are a lot of capture cards out there but I think it's advisable to get something that's quality and well regarded like the El Gato cards. In regards to setting it up in software, you would just add it under sources as a video capture device.  0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Leave a Comment Rich Text Editor. To edit a paragraph's style, hit tab to get to the paragraph menu. From there you will be able to pick one style. Nothing defaults to paragraph. An inline formatting menu will show up when you select text. Hit tab to get into that menu. Some elements, such as rich link embeds, images, loading indicators, and error messages may get inserted into the editor. You may navigate to these using the arrow keys inside of the editor and delete them with the delete or backspace key. Comment As ... 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Services starting at $149.99 More Details Micro Center Homepage Desktops Laptops Computer Parts Computer Accessories Custom PC Builder Build Showcase Networking Electronics 3D Printing Service, Upgrades & Repairs Laptop Battery Replacement Laptop Screen Repair Virus and Malware Removal Hard Drive Recovery and Backup Apple MacBook Repair Custom Built PCs Schedule an Appointment © Vanilla Foundation Theme 2021 Powered By Vanilla Community Article [CLOSED] Share your PC Building Horror Story and enter to win a 3070 Graphics Card! - Page 6 — Micro Center Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker {$smarty.capture.menu} Activity Categories Discussions Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker Home › Contests › Past Contests [CLOSED] Share your PC Building Horror Story and enter to win a 3070 Graphics Card! «1…45678910» Comments brood January 21 Way back in the Pentium 1 days my dad and I got a 15GB hard drive, a huge upgrade to our 1GB which was nearly full.  He attached it and let me screw it in (I was about 11 at the time, he would get me do a bit here and there so I would learn). We couldn't get the drive to be recognized, so we took it out and checked the jumper pins and connections, but nothing. After playing with different settings, we gave up on it and my dad decided to ask a friend for help. He knew this guy from a Ham radio club and I think he was an engineer, so my father had the utmost confidence in him. Well, he was wrong. The guy was fiddling with the drives with the power on, and had them hanging loose off the IDE cable, as my dad would say furiously in reference to this event for years after, "LIKE A BUNCH OF FISH!". He knew it was sketch, but for some reason he was compelled to not back seat drive and say anything.  Our working drive's board shorted out with a pop and smoke. To add insult to injury, the guy was aloof and just said "Oh well, it happens". My dad was irate, to the point where he never talked to this guy ever again.  Turns out the motherboard only supported up to 10GB drives, and we got it going with one of those.      0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook afreecaFreek ✭ January 21 My first desktop computer was a gift for starting college - running an AMD FX 8320 and Nvidia 750Ti. My friends had just called me up to play some competitive CSGO matchmaking while I had recently gotten into a multiplayer Civ V game. Not wanting to leave the Civ game I decided to try to play both games at the same time having utter faith that my computer would be able to handle  both games at the same time. After about two rounds into the CSGO match, I heard a pop, smelled burning, and saw some smoke waft out of the top of my PC case. My CPU/Mobo completely gave out due to overheating and some capacitors blowing, and I ended up upgrading to the i7 6700K berating myself the entire time rebuilding the computer. Never have I ever left a Civ game open while playing a different game since then. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Norton January 21 Horror for me is the stupid ones. Like years ago when I sent a customer motherboard for replacement with a M2 SSD still attached to it... No data loss since it was a cache SSD, but I paid a new one out of pocket. But nothing beats the good old taking our new build apart because it does not turn on, but it's only the PSU switch set to 220V. 1 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook JPSHRACER ✭ January 21 My computer horror story is of the first time I was building my first custom built computer. I was having a family friend help me with the installation. We got all the way to turning it on. He decided to use the wall outlet. I plugged in a surge protector. The surge protector light was red and said the outlet was not properly grounded. He said "that it did not matter". He turned on the computer, it spun up and then immediately shutdown. That was the last of that motherboard. I had the board Return Merchandize Authorization process and decided to go with a different motherboard company. My parents had an electrician come out and fixed the outlet afterwards. It would be several more months before I would get the computer rebuilt. I went to a computer tech support store to have them build the custom built computer. However, I got the custom built using the new motherboard up and running in the end. 😇 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Zvalen812_ January 21 My story was very hectic. A couple years ago I was making my first gaming pc. We had turned the computer on its side on our low height table where we were working. We had first static shocked our first cpu, so we got another. Then when it was time for the motherboard we noticed that the deal we got was too good to be true, we got used 4gb DDR3 RAM instead of a 16gb DDR4 stick. So we had to return it, and while we were waiting for our real stick, we decided to set up our water cooling device. While doing that, our thermal paste dot was way bigger than a pea, so we had to restart. While we were grabbing paper towels to clean it up, the family dog decided it was a good idea to chew the power supply cords and poop on the ssd that was right outside of the case, luckily it was still in the original package so it was not a big deal. We ordered new psu cords. While trying to put on the water cooling block, we lost a screw for it, but we had a back up. Terrible first time building (:, but I have had the computer for more than 2 years now and it is still running well. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook ccantera January 21 This last Christmas I got a new case, motherboard, and CPU fan. I took everything out of my old case and was left with my old motherboard with the CPU and stock cooler on it. I take off the stock cooler but the CPU comes off with it and is stuck on the cooler. I searched online to see how to take off the CPU without damaging it and used dental floss to try and remove it. While doing that my hand slipped and it resulted in several bent CPU pins. I thought it was over for me but I saw you can try to straighten them and I tried but that only resulted in a broken CPU pin. I expected my Christmas to be me playing Cyberpunk 2077 all day but it instead I ended up with a broken CPU. I had to wake up early the next day to go Micro Center to buy a new CPU. Probably the worst Christmas I've had. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook BeastJvalen9654 January 21 I have made 2 PCs over the past like 8-10 years, and both of them had some problems. The first one was when I was a beginner, barely knew what to buy and how to build it. I ended up buying my fans and GPU through eBay. When I got them, the fans were broken and the fan on the GPU was not working and the GPU started smoking as soon as I tried to start it. These were some of the first parts I bought so it was not a strong start. Otherwise, the first build went smoothly and I didn't have much difficulty building it. The second build was much more recent and it involved way more problems throughout the short life it lived. The purchasing process went much smoother, it was during assembly that the first problem occurred. I had my baby nephew over at the time, I stepped away for a moment and when I came back, the CPU pins were bent because he chewed on it after thinking it was a toy. I got a new CPU and finished the building process smoothly. After it was built, a friend was over and spilled a drink on the top of the box, which then dripped right onto the fans and ports of the case and shorted it out. I didn't know this happened until the next day when I went to start it up, but it was too late.  0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Shea_ ✭ January 21 Five years of playing on a budget gaming laptop throughout college, I finally gathered enough frustration with the freezes and enough money to dedicate myself to building a new laptop. I consulted my more dedicated gaming friends for advice and we picked out the parts together. Albeit a bit naïve at the start, I quickly realized that those five years only led up to disappointment, with no GPU's in sight. A pandemic, a climb in the value of bitcoins, and a never ending army of scalpers all plagued my dream. A tragic ending of a PC never built, but definitely a horror story. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook MCLover ✭ January 21 I spent $700 to build my first PC in Nov 2019. I just realized that I've spent $1,000 more to upgrade parts like better CPU, GPU, RGB RAM, PSU... Guys, stay away. This is a dangerous and horrifying hobby. 1 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook ScientiaDomini January 21 This all started with a friend gifting me an old i5 8400 and a mobo along with it. I had a pretty old 6th gen processor at the time and he happened to be upgrading his PC. He decided to gift his old stuff to me so I went to work upgrading my current rig with the new mobo and cpu. Started putting everything together and I realized I didn't have a cooler. I made a trip to the nearest PC supply store and purchased the cheapest bequiet tower cooler I could find. Standard intel stock mounting system. Easy enough right? Somehow I managed to mangle all of the plastic pins that hold the cooler to the motherboard before I could get it secured on the motherboard. I was distraught. How in the world am I going to use this new cpu without a cooler? So I did what any logical man would do and I grabbed my nearest discarded intel stock cooler out of the miscellaneous parts bin, took it to my workbench where I'm rebuilding my pc, and cannibalized the pins from the intel cooler to reuse in the tower cooler I just purchased. After struggling with the pins for 20-30min and battling more bent plastic (you'd think that removing intel's pushpins out of the cooler would be easy right? wrong.) I managed to get the cooler to stay on the motherboard without any of the pins miraculously popping out of their hole and ruining the mounting pressure of the cpu. Its a wonder I didn't bend the socket pins during all of this.... 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Suzukii ✭ January 21 edited January 21 So here is my horror story at attempting to build my own PC after 5 long years of no builds. The quick version.  I returned everything due to a frustrating experience at the store and the lack of, new, unopened ND unavailable 5950X CPU's. To continue It's a moot point now since I've already returned the CPU to the store and got a refund for it along with a refund for everything else I had purchased to put a new system together, minus the new ATX enclosure and 3070 GPU.  I had to return the CPU and everything else associated with a new build because no one at the store knows or are not at liberty to forward the information as to when the next batch will be coming in, and I definitely don't know if I would have been getting a 5950X CPU in the near future with the way things are with the lack of inventory, and I didn't want to get stuck with faulty hardware that I could not return should anything else be defective. A bit of my background experience: I'm 50 years old and have been in the I.T. industry since the 90's holding an A-Plus, Network+, CCNA and the MCSE certifications for over 15+ years (and have been building my own PC's for 20+ years).  I mention this just to give one a glimpse and a bit of insight.  In telling  this I'm not professing, by no means, nor do I wish to give anyone the idea that I am some kind of a know-it-all.  I'm just a bit seasoned in the build your own PC arena. I've learned a lesson in making future purchases and making returns of any items back to Microcenter.  After being a 15-20+ years, long and loyal customer, the treatment I received and suffered at the store this past Monday evening which I feel was undeserving and unwarranted.   It all started when at first, within a couple of days of making the CPU purchase, along with everything else required to get a new PC up and running, I took the questionable 5950X CPU back to the Paterson store since I couldn't get it to work.  However using the same hardware I could get a 3950X CPU working in the same mobo hardware.  The store staff and a manager had the audacity to tell me at the store that they were going to charge me $40 to inspect and test the CPU I had just purchased in the store less than 48 hours ago to verify if it's functionality while telling me that I had to wait 1 1/2 weeks because of the backlog. This all started because I was so excited about having gotten my hands on an AMD 5950X CPU that upon purchasing it I had neglected to look at the CPU's packaging when I paid for it at the register. Because I was in a bit of a  bereavement state, due to a recent loss hours earlier, and waiting almost 3 hours on a line in 26 degree (Fahrenheit) weather,  I didn't get to the CPU sitting in the Microcenter shopping bag for 24 hours after the purchase, only to find out that the packaging which the CPU comes in, the hard plastic clam shell, had already been cracked open, and had no external seal to break in the 1st place, prior to my purchasing it. In my excitement I said what the hell, and decided to try the CPU anyway. After trying for almost 3 or 4 days, I returned with the processor to the store and they basically looked at me like I was some sort of a guilty criminal with something to hide upon producing the CPU.   Normally I was asked by the cashier why I was returning CPU, after almost 1 minute later, of the register cashier pulling the CPU out of its plastic packaging bare handed, with no antistatic protection gear.   When I was asked by the cashier  as to what was wrong with it, I proceeded to explain how I received the CPU in the 1st place and a minute later he waved a manager over and now there were 2 people at the store register scrutinising the CPU.  Now the two gentlemen  were feverishly scrutinising the CPU,  as if though all of a sudden they were CPU Engineers with microscopes for eyes, handling the CPU with their bare hands and, again, no antistatic protective gear.  They proceeded to tell me that the CPU had a couple of bent/misaligned pins of which I could not see with my bare eyes, nor with my reading glasses on.  The glances and distrusting looks that I was receiving from each of them for about 2 minutes, were unnerving and I had to keep my composure before I told them what was really going through my mind.  Finally, the manager stated he would take it back, but he didn't hold back on giving me a lecture and a warning, as if speaking down to a miscreant child.  He stated he would make an exception, "this one time for me", in accepting the return. The possible next time I go to purchase anything at Microcenter I will make sure it is not an open item of any kind. The customer service I received that day was unwarranted, undeserving and unprofessional   I am sure that someone could scrutinise the video of the event this past Monday evening, between 7pm and 8pm, of them hovering over the processor when I returned it and study my body language to see how uncomfortable they made me, a long time, loyal, frequently returning customer.  After this experience I will not make Microcenter my 1st choice for purchasing tech enthusiast high-end items  Instead I will make my future purchases more frequent online 1st.   Well, one less person to get onto the wee hour lines waiting for that hard to get opportunity to score a great piece enthusiast item.   Sad as to how far this store,  in Paterson, has fallen.  Really sorry for the long rant. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook MNPolarbear January 21 I think the worst building nightmare I ever had to deal with was when a friend was trying to do someone else a favor trying to save them money by doing a home built PC for them.  As he was new to building PCs, he did not know about how CPUs are keyed when inserting them into the motherboard.  As such he inserts the CPU the wrong way and manages to bend a few pins on it trying to clamp it into place.  This was on a LGA socket 478 CPU.  I grabbed his lighted magnifying glass, the smallest precision screw driver and the smallest needle nose pliers he had.  With a little patience I was able to bend the few bent pins back in place so the CPU would drop into the socket properly and he wouldn't need to replace the CPU.  Talk about a sigh of relief when the PC posts and we can start installing the OS. 2 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Suzukii ✭ January 21 edited January 21 I wish that had been my case before returning the 5950X CPU I waited for on a 3+ hour line last week in Paterson.  It was DOA and it drove me nuts.  Please to anyone reading this: Do NOT ACCEPT ANY CPU'S or OPEN RAM from the store unless they can test it right there in front of you otherwise suffer the experience I was given by the store staff upon trying to return the item.  And by no means should one have to pay for the item in question to be tested if the item in question is 14 days or less from the purchase date.MNPolarbear said: I think the worst building nightmare I ever had to deal with was when a friend was trying to do someone else a favor trying to save them money by doing a home built PC for them.  As he was new to building PCs, he did not know about how CPUs are keyed when inserting them into the motherboard.  As such he inserts the CPU the wrong way and manages to bend a few pins on it trying to clamp it into place.  This was on a LGA socket 478 CPU.  I grabbed his lighted magnifying glass, the smallest precision screw driver and the smallest needle nose pliers he had.  With a little patience I was able to bend the few bent pins back in place so the CPU would drop into the socket properly and he wouldn't need to replace the CPU.  Talk about a sigh of relief when the PC posts and we can start installing the OS. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Brik January 22 My first PC build was a B50 Phenom II and I had NO IDEA what I was idea. I put everything together and couldn't figure out how to turn it on. I saw a post about putting a penny on the two posts for the power switch but I ended up putting the penny to the CMOS Clear switch and somehow ended up burned up the BIOS. Had to RMA the motherboard after hours of working on it and there wasn't a giant catalog of youtube tutorials or diagnostic tools online 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Coconuts January 22 On my first build I plugged the HDMI cable into the mobo instead of the graphics card and felt despair when nothing displayed on screen. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Kayaker ✭ January 22 This was way back in the 20th century.   Had just upgraded a computer for a sweet lady and I was proud.  Pride and inexperience led me to confidently connect the 2.5 inch floppy drive to its power connector as the final piece in this upgrade.  Only I inserted it backwards.  Didn't realize it until the power supply popped and fizzed on first fireup.  I felt really bad for my customer as the 'young tech hotshot' screwed up and knocked her computer out of use for several days.  Hardware today is much more idiot proof as connectors can only go in one way.  1 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook hiddenGamer28 ✭ January 22 The computer I am using now is actually a friend built hand me down I got a few years ago when my pre-built dell died.  I've had it for about 5 years and it uses an i7-870 so that should tell you how old it is in general.  I've replaced some computer components before but have never really built a computer, but during the quarantine I discovered build guides on YouTube and was excited to build a computer myself.  I am out of work so I can't afford a whole new computer, but as I was watching the videos I started to notice little things about my computer that I could fix.  The main things I saw were; there was no cable management, the cpu cooler was mounted facing straight up rather than with the air flow, and the rear fan would stop moving and required me to physically spin the blades to start it up again.  I started with the fan and replaced that pretty easily.  There was another fan in the front that had never worked and it turns out it was never plugged into the header.  I downloaded the mobo manual to find the front header and fixed that too.  I tried to do the cable management but the case was so old and there was no room to work so I asked for a new case for Xmas.  I figured it would be easy enough to just switch the cases but it took way longer than I expected. The first problem I ran into was that one of the screws wouldn't unscrew from the motherboard.  In fact, when I unscrewed it, it pulled out the riser from the case itself.  Luckily it still fit into the new case even with the other screw so that ended up turning out ok.  It took way longer than I thought it would, but I managed to get everything done in about 2 hours and went to turn it on and............nothing. No post, no screen, no error, nothing.  It would run and all the fans would turn on, but nothing would appear on the screen.  I had to hard shutdown by holding down the power button, but a couple seconds later it would always restart.  I ended up having to pull the power to get it to stay off so I could work on it.  I pulled out the ram and put it back in (one stick didn't go in all the way so the mobo yelled at me for that).  I pulled out my graphics card and put it back in.  I redid all the wires for the front panel, I checked all the screws, I checked all the wire connections, I took out and reinstalled the PSU.  Nothing worked.  After 3 hours trying to get it to post, I was about to give up.  I decided to go back to the old case to see if there was anything I missed.  I gave it a good shake and a teeny tiny little piece of beige plastic fell out from behind one of the panels.  I went to google and looked up pictures of my motherboard and compared those to the manual and it was the bios config jumper.  At this point I was extremely upset because I broke off a very important piece of the motherboard and I wasn't sure if it could even be fixed. But while I was reading the manual I noticed that there were 3 pins the jumper plugged into.  I looked at the motherboard and there were 3 pins still.  It was at this point I realized it just slides onto the pins.  I placed it on and it started right away.  At this point I thought about the 3 hours I had just wasted because of this tiny piece of plastic.   tldr: on my first computer build the mobo bios config jumper fell off in the old case and it took me 3 hours to figure that out. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Darkle_Gray January 22 The Story begins the day before college classes are slated to start. I have my trusty Dell prebuilt XPS from the 2010 vintage and saw that Windows 10 needed to update. I allowed it to reset and waited...and waited...and waited. It rebooted, then nothing. Then rebooted again. Insert infinite regress boot cycle. I take a coffee break, hoping it magically fixes itself, but woe unto me, it does not. Now, I need a computer, and the only place I can think of to look for one is Micro Center. I brave the wild crowds and wander the store, and find myself in the prebuilt and monitor side, where I end up with a refurbished HP prebuilt. Why not? less work and I can get up and running. Think again. I get it home, fire it up, and look inside. No way I can use this. Non-upgradeable without an immense amount of work and money. So back to the store I go, with the resolve to go with my original idea of finally building my very first pc, from the ground up. I've repaired and replaced plenty of components in my time but never built one from the start. I have a Powerspec 750 watt power supply, Samsung Evo SSD and a 4TB spinning rust,  and a GTX 780 from my recently befuddled Dell, along with 2 Acer XV240Y monitors for the cause. With this in mind, I proceed to gather the needed items, with a Ryzen processor, open box MSI B450 motherboard, Ram, and a Lian Li case. Got my prizes home, and cleared the desk. Open the motherboard, and find...the backplate was missing, and also refused to show any signs of life. So... back to the store. Perusing the open box motherboards again, I find an ASUS ROG B450 motherboard that not only works but offers me so much more for now and in the future.  And after all that work, extra trips to and from my local Micro Center, and the headaches of building my first bespoke computer I now have a pretty decent rig, with a mid-range mobo, Ryzen 5 3600, and a ton of potential for the future for upgrades. In particular, a much more modern RTX or RX video card, a VR rig, more memory, and an NVME drive. If you made it this far, thank you for reading this, and I am genuinely excited to have been able to do this. It's something I've been wanting to do for a long time, and it feels great to accomplish this and bring it into reality.  0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook EmmaB ✭ January 22 edited January 22 During my first and only build I put the CPU in without lifting the retention arm and continued to tighten the cooler on top of it. I had been trying for a solid 10 minutes to get the CPU to fit properly and finally thought I had done it.  I had no idea what I had done and ended up going to a computer shop to find my mistake.  Luckily none of the pins were bent but I spent about 50$ for them to find and fix it.  0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook zeigan January 22 Years ago I learned the hard way the damage static electricity can do on a processor. And why it's never a good idea to hand straighten bent pins on one carelessly. They just snapped right off.  0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook AndrewC January 22 I don't have any serious horror stories from building pc's, but on my first build we could not get the pc to post. It was mine and my brother's first build and we finally found out that the pc was not plugged into the monitor. This frustrated us because we just could not figure out what was wrong. Finally we found the unplugged cord and fixed the problem. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook MattNemesis ✭ January 22 edited January 22 Funny story/unfortunate stories, but the pc build went fine, I was driving back from microcenter to my parents house to pick up some tools to ultimately build my bros new pc at my townhome, AMD FX-6100, 2x 4GB DDR3 1600 ram sticks, EVGA GTX 560, ASUS AM3+ M5A97 motherboard, Thermaltake V3 Black edition case, kingwin 120mm blue led case fans, Hyper 212 EVO cooler. On my way back to my place I had all the pc parts in the front passengers seat buckled up nice and safe. The motherboard box fell off the seat to the passengers side leg room area. I reached down to grab it to make sure it was ok while driving, I veered right just a little bit, on my parents street not to the point of hitting the pavement, but one of the houses mailboxes was tilted a little bit too much into the street, to which my passengers side mirror hit it and ripped off and did damage all down the side of my car, around 3600 dollars in damage and a mailbox replacement lol.  Also did a build for a friend at his house and was finishing up to make sure the Windows install went ok and it booted (he was going to install the drivers, (he got all the parts from microcenter the previous day), my reward was a 6 pack of beer. Upon leaving and driving home, 2 cars in front of me braked really hard to try to avoid an animal but ran over an Opossum anyway,  the person in front of me braked, I braked and avoided hitting the person, the person behind me rear-ended me at 45 mph and I poped in my seat lifting my foot off the brake (manual car) and physics made hit the person in front of me, completely totaling my car. The car was a Dodge Dart 6-speed turbo edition. If I stayed to install the drivers on the pc I would have avoided the situation lol. Coming home from microcenter recently to try to get a new GPU with no luck, a pickup truck in front of me veered to avoid a piece of aluminum on the highway, he kicked it up and it hit the front of my car and glancing off the passangers side of the hood, did some damage and ended up get a flat tire yesterday because of it also lol. Not begging to get this GPU, but I cant deny the facts lol, gl to all! 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Suzukii ✭ January 22 MattNemesis said: Funny story/unfortunate stories, but the pc build went fine, I was driving back from microcenter to my parents house to pick up some tools to ultimately build my bros new pc at my townhome, AMD FX-6100, 2x 4GB DDR3 1600 ram sticks, EVGA GTX 560, ASUS AM3+ M5A97 motherboard, Thermaltake V3 Black edition case, kingwin 120mm blue led case fans, Hyper 212 EVO cooler. On my way back to my place I had all the pc parts in the front passengers seat buckled up nice and safe. The motherboard box fell off the seat to the passengers side leg room area. I reached down to grab it to make sure it was ok while driving, I veered right just a little bit, on my parents street not to the point of hitting the pavement, but one of the houses mailboxes was tilted a little bit too much into the street, to which my passengers side mirror hit it and ripped off and did damage all down the side of my car, around 3600 dollars in damage and a mailbox replacement lol.  Also did a build for a friend at his house and was finishing up, (he got all the parts from microcenter the previous day), my reward was a 6 pack of beer. Upon leaving and driving home, 2 cars in front of me braked really hard to try to avoid an animal but ran over an Opossum anyway,  the person in front of me braked, I braked and avoided hitting the person, the person behind me rear-ended me at 45 mph and I poped in my seat lifting my foot off the brake (manual car) and physics made hit the person in front of me, completely totaling my car. The car was a Dodge Dart 6 speed turbo edition. Unfortunate loss but for PC building all worth it. Def. unfortunate events for you. If I were you I'd stop drinking and building.PC's or at least have a designated PC equipment handler on speed dial. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook MattNemesis ✭ January 22 edited January 22 Suzukii said: MattNemesis said: Funny story/unfortunate stories, but the pc build went fine, I was driving back from microcenter to my parents house to pick up some tools to ultimately build my bros new pc at my townhome, AMD FX-6100, 2x 4GB DDR3 1600 ram sticks, EVGA GTX 560, ASUS AM3+ M5A97 motherboard, Thermaltake V3 Black edition case, kingwin 120mm blue led case fans, Hyper 212 EVO cooler. On my way back to my place I had all the pc parts in the front passengers seat buckled up nice and safe. The motherboard box fell off the seat to the passengers side leg room area. I reached down to grab it to make sure it was ok while driving, I veered right just a little bit, on my parents street not to the point of hitting the pavement, but one of the houses mailboxes was tilted a little bit too much into the street, to which my passengers side mirror hit it and ripped off and did damage all down the side of my car, around 3600 dollars in damage and a mailbox replacement lol.  Also did a build for a friend at his house and was finishing up, (he got all the parts from microcenter the previous day), my reward was a 6 pack of beer. Upon leaving and driving home, 2 cars in front of me braked really hard to try to avoid an animal but ran over an Opossum anyway,  the person in front of me braked, I braked and avoided hitting the person, the person behind me rear-ended me at 45 mph and I poped in my seat lifting my foot off the brake (manual car) and physics made hit the person in front of me, completely totaling my car. The car was a Dodge Dart 6 speed turbo edition. Unfortunate loss but for PC building all worth it. Def. unfortunate events for you. If I were you I'd stop drinking and building.PC's or at least have a designated PC equipment handler on speed dial. Lol, didn't drink any of it until I got home of course because my car got totaled, the cop laughed at me because I was taking a 6 pack of unopened beer out of the trunk (at least it opened before it got towed and the beer wasn't damaged lol). Luckily everyone was ok in that ordeal, the person that rear-ended me, his car was totaled also.  1 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Abdel ✭ January 22 I m hear to learn how to build computers  thank you 1 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook someguynamedmatt ✭ January 22 edited January 22 I've been building PC's now since around 1997 as a hobby. I have two specific horror stories. 1) Around 2000 the AMD thunderbird core processors came out and I wanted a new 750MHz computer, complete with 512MB of RAM. WHOA what speed (cue doge meme). The board I had gotten was a Biostar mATX board that had a built in graphics card. Extremely rare chipset, too, that if you ever lost the driver floppy, you were toast. I did. Went to reload WIN98 and 640x480 graphics FTL. A friend of mine lent me an ATI Rago Pro 32MB to test out. I plugged it in, booted up to a wonderful BSOD over and over again. Suddenly smelled smoke coming from the PC. Turns out the power supply was a puny 200w unit that barely took care of combo I had in there, and the video card drew just enough current and voltage through the MOBO that it wrecked my system. This was before the days of DVRM and AVRM and all the other acronyms for voltage and amperage signals that help clean up the power. CPU survived, but the PSU, HDD, MOBO and my pci modem all died. Went to a computer show the next week, repurchased what was needed and had a new rig with a 400w PSU. 2) I've NEVER done a watercooling or other exotic cooling solution and decided that 2015 was the year to do one. Intel 4790K, EVGA SLI 970's, Gigabyte Z97 MOBO. Alphacool GPU waterblocks, EK CPU block, 120mm and 360mm radiators with an Eheim pump. Took me nearly a week to fully customize and assemble into an OLD Antec P120w. I made sure every fitting was clamped and leak tested for 48 hours, just to be safe. Fast forward two weeks. I'm sitting at my desk looking at my bay mounted reservoir and realize that the water level has dropped. Significantly. It's a dual bay reservoir and the pump is external, so volume in the reservoir is maxed out. It's got to be at least 500ml that has gone missing. So I take a look inside and see nothing, no drips, no dye anywhere. I go to refill it, and that's when the leak reveals itself. The fitting, although screwed in, had somehow backed out of the upper 970 waterblock. The water had been dripping onto the lower GPU and traveled along the hot backplate, then traversing back under the backplate, dropping onto the PCB. Tried to dry it all out, only to find the damage had already been done. The GPU had somehow kept going despite the damage, but although I had cleaned it up, it was time for that GPU to say farewell. Sure enough the regulators were cooked. After ripping all of it out, redoing everything, I went to power it up, and another unseen leak above the PSU, this time, dripped right into it. SEVERAL large pops later, I was ordering a new corsair 1100w. Ever since then when it's maintenance time, I triple check everything, run a spare external PSU just for the pump before ever plugging anything in. Although I loved building the PC, I don't know that I will ever do another watercooling build, especially when the efficiency level of components continues to improve. BTW, this rig is still my home daily rig. Looking forward to running a 3070 in it one day. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Thomaschio ✭ January 22 My build nightmare is a long one..... Initially my build was great, worked fine. The nightmare comes in with the intervention on my son who was 2 and a half at the time. This child poured an entire cup of juice in the top of my computer when I was at work. At first I tried cleaning everything off with alcohol. At first, it seemed like the only part that actually bought it was the motherboard, I thought I was lucky. One hundred dollars and 3 hours of drive time to Microcenter is getting off easy considering the circumstances. After rebuilding my computer and reinstalling everything it booted up. I was extremely happy, until 3 hours later when my GPU decided to pick up a heavier smoking habit than mine. Next paycheck, 3 more hours of driving and 400 dollars later I get a new gpu. At the time it wasn't a terrible thing, I was able to get a nice upgrade. Everything booted up fine it was working marvelously until i started to game. The over current protection started tripping. As anyone still reading this would guess it, another 3 hour drive to get a power supply. Fast forward a week and several memory errors later. I make another 3 hour drive because the RAM did not survive the juice unscathed. Thanks to my son, i now realize it is possible to put more miles than dollars into a computer. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook afernandez28 January 22 Unfortunately my PC Build Horror Story is still taking place as we speak! Scammed out of Nvidia GeForce RTX 3070 Graphics Card on Ebay Since the middle of last summer in 2020 I have been slowly accumulating all the parts on my custom build list for my very first PC build, but the only remaining part I need would be the 3070 Graphics card that I've been searching for day in and day out! Now we all know the industry shortage on these graphics cards and the overwhelming demand causing a severe supply shortage, but what makes it worse is the bots and scalpers that have these take the limited supply of graphics cards only to resell for a much higher price leaving those who actually need the card without one ! While searching online for any available supply I figured I would entertain the idea of looking at some of the scalper prices on Ebay, but boy was that a mistake! I found a Nvidia GeForce RTX 3070 graphics card (the one I wanted for my build) which was still asking for more than the stock price ($500), but it was about $100 less than what others wanted for it ($700 instead of $800). Knowing how fast any available graphics cards are taken, I knew I needed to act fast if I wanted a shot at obtaining one! The rush of adrenaline pushed me to taking out my card and buying it with no hesitation, but this is where it all went wrong...I misread the description of the item and bought A PICTURE OF THE GRAPHICS CARD FOR $700!!! Now I know this is entirely my fault for acting too quick without throughly looking through the details, but after searching for months I have grown anxious and jumped at the first opportunity! So now here I am needing only the graphics card to finish my first ever PC build, but I am sitting with just a picture of it and not the real thing out of $700 on top of that...hopefully my luck can change with this contest! 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Karter Ohio ✭ January 22 I’ve had 3 build story’s. The first one was with my first and second pc builds, I was building my pc and my grandparents office pc, and when I went to download windows 10 onto a thumb drive from my old windows 7 computer I couldn’t get my computer to recognize the drive, so for the next 11 hours I tried to get it to work. On top of that I couldn’t get a display output from my gpu, so I eventually took my old computers dvd drive, connected the sata cable from it into my motherboard and the power supply from my grandparents build because my psu hadn’t come yet, and used the windows 10 installation dvd that was for their parts, an old nvidia 9300 from my moms 10 year old pc so I could get display output and was finally able to get windows 10 installed on both computers. Was able to build their computer no problems but my pc wasn’t so fortunate... after I built my computer and had it connected to the tv for a couple days ( I hadn’t bought my computer monitor yet ) I went out of town for 2 weeks. When I got home I  moved the pc into my room, hooked everything up pressed the power button... and Nothing, that started 2 weeks of trouble shooting. At first I thought it was a bad 24 pin eps connector, because when the evga power supply works it has a solid green light in the back. And when that cable was unplugged the light came on instead of flashing, so I got one sent to me under warranty ( props to EVGA for great customer support ) the new cable arrived and still nothing. That’s when I started to panic a little bit 😅, and when I was putting in the new eps cable my cablemod 24 pin extension cable broke as well another return 🙄 but Amazon was pretty good about it so that was no problem. Over the next couple days me and my dad tried to figure out what was wrong. We narrowed it down to a grounding issue so one night I took the whole computer apart set the stuff on the box and it finally worked. I spent the next 5 hours taking a nail file and sanding the paint off the back of the motherboard screws reassembling the computer and it STILL didn’t work, so I replugged in every cable that I thought was important, and nothing, I decided to check the fans and rgb... turns out a backwards rgb cable kept my pc from running for almost 3 weeks.                The second story is one of my friends builds, I had been helping him pick out parts for the past several weeks. When he got all the parts he had another one of his friends help him build the computer, a day later he video calls me asking him to help him configure his hard drive (because it wasn’t showing up in bios or anything ) turns out when his friend was building his pc, in the rats nest of cable management, he forgot to plug in sata power to the hard drive, an easy fix but kind of funny.           And the last story. Just recently I helped a friend of mine with  his first pc build, and I walked him through it over several video calls. There was some confusion in the end with his gpu. First was he didn’t have the gpu screws out of the pcie slot cover so the gpu was just wedged in the case, the fingers on the back of the gpu weren’t even in the slots either, just a couple degrees from breaking the pcb and destroying the gpu entirely, so when I told him to remove the screws from the back of the gpu slot cover he thought that  I meant the gpu backplate and took that off accidentally, after he got it assembled it wouldn’t post, and the gpu fans wouldn’t spin meaning it wasn’t getting power, so after about 2 hours of unplugging and replugging cables and stuff in, we called it a night, the next day he de- and re-assembled the computer and it finally worked. But I’ve had some “fun” troubleshooting computers now. But I still love it and can’t wait to see what the next generations of pcs can do 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Waffler Cleveland, OH ✭ January 22 My horror story is actually the whole reason why I got into the PC building hobby. It was back in 1999, I had bought a Dell computer for myself for gaming and such. One day, I ran into BSOD. At the time, I was pretty clueless about computers, so I called Dell Tech Support. First, a little background about me before I go on to give you better context of my experience. I'm completely deaf in my left ear and severely hard-of-hearing in my right ear, in which I wear a hearing aid. I can speak on the phone and, most of the time, get by OK. Not this time...read on. I get a guy with a heavy accent and speaking somewhat broken English. For a guy like me with hearing loss, this was a bad omen. I kindly asked if I could be transferred to someone who could speak more clearly and, frankly, a more American cadence. I want to emphasize that this ISN'T prejudice at work but the laws of physics (sound) and my ears' inability to process sound. As a result, much of what is said to me either sounds like underwater noise or different words (I'm a walking homonym dictionary). Of course, the guy was doing his best to be kind and offer his help, despite my repeated and desperate pleas to transfer me. (Side note, I had called a few times prior to this with similar results and gave up on trying to get lucky with someone who could speak better for me). Resigned, I explained my problem and, to his credit, did the best he could to walk me through diagnosing and solving. The entire call took FOUR hours, with him sometimes literally spelling words out for me (and even his LETTERS sounded like other letters to me!). We eventually resolved the problem, but after that, I swore I was never going to call tech support again and just learn it on my own. That's how I figured out how easy PC building is when I installed more RAM for the first time. I give a lot of credit to that guy for being patient with me, but my patience ran out several times. If only more businesses back then were more sensitive to needs like mine like they are now (better late than never, I suppose), but then I'd never have gotten into PC building! 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook «1…45678910» This discussion has been closed. 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Services starting at $149.99 More Details Micro Center Homepage Desktops Laptops Computer Parts Computer Accessories Custom PC Builder Build Showcase Networking Electronics 3D Printing Service, Upgrades & Repairs Laptop Battery Replacement Laptop Screen Repair Virus and Malware Removal Hard Drive Recovery and Backup Apple MacBook Repair Custom Built PCs Schedule an Appointment © Vanilla Foundation Theme 2021 Powered By Vanilla Community Article Games crashing within 5 minutes of launch — Micro Center Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker {$smarty.capture.menu} Activity Categories Discussions Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker Home › General Discussion Games crashing within 5 minutes of launch KevinY ✭ July 2020 edited July 2020 in General Discussion Hi, Every single game I play crashes, usually within 5 minutes of launching. It always crashes back to desktop with no warning. The problem has been occurring for almost a week now, and I'm not sure if its a software/driver problem, or if a piece of hardware is failing. Things I've tried: -Reinstalling/uninstalling GPU drivers -Swapping to another GPU -Re-seated RAM sticks -Tested RAM with Memtest86 (0 errors) -Reinstalled Win10 twice -Updated Bios -Monitored CPU and GPU temps, which seem to be normal Any help would be deeply appreciated. Thank you. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook «12» Comments TSMikeW admin July 2020 Please describe the crash in greater detail. Is this a BSOD, CTD, or black screen? Has the system ever crashed outside of a game? 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook KevinY ✭ July 2020 Sorry, when a game crashes it just brings me back to the desktop. It just closes without warning. I had one blue screen in the past week ( Page fault in a nonpaged area), but I'm unsure if thats related to the games crashing. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook TSMikeW admin July 2020 Okay. So you're getting a CTD ( Crash to desktop ). Please list your full system specs and also list what games you're playing that have crashed. If you could take a screenshot of what's in your event viewer logs at the time of the crash, that would be helpful as well. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook KevinY ✭ July 2020 Win10 2004; OS Build: 19041.329 Motherboard: Asus Prime X570 P  CPU: AMD 3600x GPU: MSI Ventus 2080 RAM: Corsair Vengeance 2x8 16gb 3200mhz PSU: Corsair RM750x These random crashes happen in every game I play, most commonly in Hunter: Call of the Wild, League of Legends, and Valorant. It's happened in Jedi Fallen Order as well, but after about half an hour of game play, and I've only tested that game once for crashing. As for the event viewer logs, nothing ever pops up in there when I check after a crash under System in Event Viewer.  0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook TSMikeW admin July 2020 It's an application crash, it should have some error under "Application". You can look under Custom Views > Administrative Events" as well. They'll be a lot of stuff there, but you'll see the application error and potentially some other related errors. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook KevinY ✭ July 2020 These are the 2 errors that popped up this time: I also noticed this error under Application when I launched the game, this popped up: 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook TSMikeW admin July 2020 Try the other games you're having issues with and lets try to accumulate similar data from each of them. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook JackKandle ✭ July 2020 I am having a very similar issue with my PC and a couple Call of Duty titles (BO3 and MW). Have tried similar troubleshooting steps with no good result. Looking forward to seeing how this develops. If it would be helpful I can post information related to my case, but I don't want to hijack OP's thread 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook TSMikeW admin July 2020 I haven't heard from @KevinY in a while. If you could post your dxdiag reports here. Please provide details on what's going on with your games as well. If it's a CTD or a BSOD, ect. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook JackKandle ✭ July 2020 Sure thing. I am experiencing CTD after about 10 minutes playing Black Ops 3 zombies and Call of Duty Modern Warfare (both multiplayer and Warzone modes cause the CTD). BO3 becomes unresponsive and I usually need to End Task from task manager but it appears any active sound effects continue. I activated an in-game song which continued playing like normal after the freeze, but the other active sound effects remained static, indicating to me that the state of the game was not progressing (as if frozen in time). MW will fully CTD and close itself with a DirectX error, typically 6068. I have been having this issue since ~March of this year when last Fall both games were working perfectly. I have not recently updated any aspects of my setup, aside from regularly updating drivers and the troubleshooting steps listed later. System info: Intel i7 7700k w/ turboboost active and Cryorig H7 cooler MOBO: Asrock Z270 extreme 4 2x8 GB G skill ripjaws DDR4-3200 (with proper profile being used in BIOS) 500 GB samsung 960 EVO (where OS is installed) 2 TB Seagate Barracuda HDD (where games are installed) EVGA Geforce 1080ti EVGA 750W power supply So far I have tried the following troubleshooting steps with no success: Various game setting tweaks (lowering settings maybe made the games last a few minutes longer before crashing, but tough to claim causality b/c amount of time until crash is somewhat inconsistent, though it typically takes about 5-15 min) Underclocked GPU using MSI Afterburner Hardware tests (all showed no errors): memtest86, OCCT to test GPU and CPU, Prime95 + coreTemp, windows memory diagnostic, windows chkdsk, intel processor diagnostic tool. Temperature monitoring shows CPU gets hot quickly (~95 C in 5-10 min) when running most stressful OCCT test but rarely goes above 90 when playing games or Prime95. I've read that for 7700k this may be reasonable. Recently reapplied thermal paste which didn't seem to help much. Idle temps around 30 C Clean reinstall of all drivers I could find Reinstalled Windows 10 Reinstalled both games (and prior to that ran the file checker deal in Steam) Rolled back graphics drivers to known working version from December 2019 Disabled certain audio drivers Windows defender virus scans (full and offline) In case it's relevant - prior to my most recent Windows installation, my system would freeze occasionally on startup or when close to idle like when internet browsing or using Discord (no BSOD, but the PC would become unresponsive and require restart). When playing games or running a stress test, this freeze never occurred. I was having that issue since I originally built this PC (in 2017) but since it did not impact game performance I never bothered to fix it. I have not seen this issue since reinstalling Windows about a month ago. DxDiag is attached. Thanks for your help. DxDiag.txt 77K 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook TSMikeW admin July 2020 I don't see any problems in the DXDiag. The problem with the freezing while idle is interesting. Generally with freezing, you think HDD unresponsive. This doesn't apply to NVME drives most of the time, they're running on the PCIe bus, it can freeze but they seem more likely to cause BSOD's. I assume you have a lot of software on the Seagate to save room. Are these games on the Seagate? Could you disconnect the Seagate and test a game on the SSD only? Have either of the users in this thread experienced artifacting or screen tearing? 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook JackKandle ✭ July 2020 You would be assuming correctly - I put these games on the Seagate to save space since they're multiplayer and I don't need rapid load speeds. I will try disconnecting the seagate and reinstalling on the NVME and get back to you with the results. I have not noticed any screen tearing. One issue I do recall seeing is the cutscenes in the MW single player would stutter a bit visually. I have read some about it online and it seems to have been a common problem back when the game launched, but that occurred months before any games started crashing for me. For my own knowledge, if this is an HDD issue, why might reinstalling Windows make the freezing while idle issue stop but not resolve the games crashing? Or perhaps are you thinking the issue is still there and I just haven't come across it yet? 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook TSMikeW admin July 2020 Well, based on your original description it sounds like the drive idles.  HDD's go into power save mode and they stop spinning. What it sounds like to me is the drive parks and when the system tries to wake it, it doesn't respond and this results in a freeze. You would probably notice that system was running slow, and that you could still move the mouse, but shortly thereafter it would hard lock, mouse included. Sound about right? With all the problems you're having between those two things, I don't think a reinstall would help, particularly if the non OS drive is the problem. You can set the drive to never sleep in power options. Fun a full check disk on it. From elevated command prompt: chkdsk /r 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook JackKandle ✭ July 2020 That does not sound quite right. I have never noticed that the system runs slow before a freeze, it always seemed to just freeze with no warning (again, have not seen the whole system crash in a while now). When the whole machine would freeze the mouse would lock up, but when I get games crashing to desktop I can still do everything just fine outside of the game. I reinstalled BO3 onto the NVME drive, disconnected the HDD and tried to play but the crash still occurred - lasted about 7 minutes. Max temps 86 C. I ran chkdsk /r and got the message "Windows scanned the file system and found no problems." I am certainly no expert but I am inclined to think the CTD and the system freezes are two separate issues since I have not had a freeze in a while. I'm just unsure why a Windows reinstall would (seemingly) fix that. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook TSMikeW admin July 2020 edited July 2020 Would seem that they are, and you've ruled out the data driver at least. I did not read your previous post thoroughly enough. You mentioned that the audio continues and this wouldn't be the case if the drive were involved, so we can rule out the NVME as well. Are there any other games you play and do they crash as well or do they run fine? If so I don't see another step besides swapping in and testing another GPU.   0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook JackKandle ✭ July 2020 I have experienced this crash in Call of Duty Modern Warfare as well, though with that game the CTD usually comes with a directX error code (6068, most often. I haven't been able to find much online about what that code actually means). I haven't played any other games on PC but I could try some others if you think that would help. I haven't tried a less intense game like Minecraft yet, so that would be interesting to see. Are you thinking this could be a GPU issue or would that just be your next troubleshooting strategy? 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook TSMikeW admin July 2020 It's possible it's the card. It's also possible that it's an issue specifically with this card and the games you're playing. This could be something that's part of a profile being applied to the card for those games specifically. Another game that is demanding would be a good test here.  0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook JackKandle ✭ July 2020 Ok thanks for the info, I'll try a different demanding game. I will post an update once I've had a change to give that a try. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook TSMichaelB admin July 2020 Looking over this thread, it looks like you've exhausted quite a few troubleshooting options. A couple of things I haven't seen yet involve the CPU (it provides the PCIe lanes you are using for your GPU, so it's not entirely out of the question) and any external devices connected to the system that may also trigger a crash.  Starting with the CPU, I would advise reseating the processor and in doing so, making sure there are no bent pins or debris in the socket and that the gold contacts underneath  the CPU look clean. Wiping it down with 70% or higher Isopropyl Alcohol is not a bad idea as it would also remove any oils from your skin contact. With the CPU and motherboard pins physically inspected, take note of the PCIe slot you have the card installed in. Conventional wisdom recommends having the card installed in the top-most PCIe x16 slot as it's typically wired to be full x16 bandwidth instead of x8 or x4. If you are already using this slot, it probably wouldn't hurt to give the next x16 slot a try to rule out a defective slot. Lastly, try removing all external devices from the system except for mouse, keyboard & monitor. No external storage or unnecessary peripherals (VR headsets, racing equipment, video capture devices, etc). See if the CTD's still occur in your games. The goal is to remove as many variables as possible and rule out whats left. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook JackKandle ✭ July 2020 @TSMikeW I was able to play Rocket League on max settings for 45 minutes with no issue. That's not the most demanding but its more modern than most games I have. Do you think that was demanding enough to really test your hypothesis or should I try another? The only others I have that I think of as demanding are Rainbow 6 Siege and Apex Legends. I may have Destiny 2 as well, though I don't know how much of the game I still have access to since it's changed so much over the years.  @TSMichaelB Thanks for the additional input! I will re-seat and visually inspect my CPU this weekend as you have described and report back. I do not expect to find any issues since I hadn't so much as opened the case in 2 years prior to having these issues. In regard to the PCIe slots, my MOBO only has one x16 slot and it is the one currently in use. I could try the x8 slot if you think that's worth doing. For peripherals, I have tried this already. The only thing I use besides the monitor and KBM is my wireless headset but the CTD occurs with or without that headset being plugged in. I have tried also disabling the audio drivers for that device as well as unplugging it to no avail. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook TSTonyV admin July 2020 JackKandle said: @TSMikeW I was able to play Rocket League on max settings for 45 minutes with no issue. That's not the most demanding but its more modern than most games I have. Do you think that was demanding enough to really test your hypothesis or should I try another? The only others I have that I think of as demanding are Rainbow 6 Siege and Apex Legends. I may have Destiny 2 as well, though I don't know how much of the game I still have access to since it's changed so much over the years.  @TSMichaelB Thanks for the additional input! I will re-seat and visually inspect my CPU this weekend as you have described and report back. I do not expect to find any issues since I hadn't so much as opened the case in 2 years prior to having these issues. In regard to the PCIe slots, my MOBO only has one x16 slot and it is the one currently in use. I could try the x8 slot if you think that's worth doing. For peripherals, I have tried this already. The only thing I use besides the monitor and KBM is my wireless headset but the CTD occurs with or without that headset being plugged in. I have tried also disabling the audio drivers for that device as well as unplugging it to no avail. You should be fine to test Destiny 2, a large portion of the game is available as free-to-play anyway so even if it's been a while you'll have access to a lot of areas. Apex Legends would probably also be a good test. Never hurts to have more points of comparison.  I'd definitely try what Mike B recommended, and let us know the results once you get the chance.  0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook JackKandle ✭ July 2020 edited July 2020 All, firstly thanks again for all the suggestions and assistance. I have a couple updates. First, I was able to try Apex Legends and it also had a CTD with an error message (I'll attach a screenshot). However, yesterday my friends wanted to play call of duty Modern Warfare so I tried something new: I turned the resolution down from 1440p to 1080p and capped the frame rate at 90. With this configuration, I was able to play for about an hour and a half with no issues. Then, I tried leaving the FPS capped but turning the resolution back up to 1440p and it crashed within 5 mintues. Turned the 1440p back down to 1080 and played another 45 minutes with no issue. Then, I tried turning the FPS cap up to 144 and again the game crashed within 5 minutes or so. I was able to repeat this test with BO3 too - 1080p w/ FPS capped at 85 worked fine for an hour and a half. Turned it back up to 1440p and it crashed in 5 minutes. I have not yet had a chance to inspect my CPU (need to get more rubbing alcohol) but I plan to do that this weekend and I will report back after I do so. Though having now been able to observe this behavior, it seems even more likely (to me anyway) that this is indeed related to the graphics card in some way. Edit: one other new behavior I saw - once (before I lowered settings) in MW I was sitting in the menus waiting for my friends' match to end and I got a CTD. Theoretically, not even doing anything computationally intense just literally at the multiplayer menu. This was probably the first time I let the game sit in the menus for any extended period of time which is probably why it's the first time I saw it happen this way. apex_error_message.png 6.2K 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook TSTonyV admin July 2020 That error message looks like it's related to DirectX. Something simple you can try just to rule this out: In the NVIDIA control panel under 3D settings there should be a performance mode. Set it to balanced or maximum and see if anything changes, assuming it's not already. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook JackKandle ✭ July 2020 edited July 2020 Is that the "Power management mode" setting (under global tab of Manage 3D settings)? I'm not seeing one that says just performance Edit: Wait, you may mean the slider under "Adjust image settings with preview"? That one has a balanced option. It was set to emphasize Quality before, I will try it on Balanced and see if that makes any difference. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook TSTonyV admin July 2020 I was talking specifically about the power management mode, but honestly setting any of those control panel settings back to their defaults could be a good step to try anyway.  0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook JackKandle ✭ July 2020 edited July 2020 As far as I know they were on the defaults before, I don't think I've changed them. Anyway, I restored them all to default and then changed the power setting to maximum performance and got the CTD like usual. And since you mention DirectX, I do get DirectX error 6068 from Modern Warfare when it crashes. Also tried playing with the settings in the "adjust image settings menu," and continued to get the CTD with each option I tried. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook TSTonyV admin July 2020 edited July 2020 Yeah, I'd say this is definitely pointing towards a GPU problem. Michael's recommendations are probably still worth a shot, but popping multiple DirectX errors like that across different games usually points to driver related problems, but we've ruled drivers out at this point with the other things you've already tried. I'm comfortable saying this is a likely GPU problem, Mike and Michael might be able to weigh in more but I think that's pretty much where we've landed 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook JackKandle ✭ July 2020 Ok, thanks for the help. I will still inspect the CPU to be sure. So if we suspect this is a GPU problem, do you have any recommendations for ways to prove definitively that it's the GPU (and I suppose also rule out the possibility of a PCIe/motherboard issue)? OCCT does not find any errors but I haven't tried any other tools. My card has a 3 year warranty that expires in the fall so if I can prove there's an issue with it I can cash that in. I'm not sure if the software Microcenter uses to test things would reveal the issue but I'd pay to give that a shot if it has potential. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook TSTonyV admin July 2020 The most definitive way would be to test another video card in the system and see if it does the same thing.  You could always bring your computer to the service desk at your local store and we could run diagnostics on it, but that would be a $39.99 fee.  0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook JackKandle ✭ July 2020 I'll stick with finding another video card for now then and if that becomes a challenge I'll just pay for the diagnostic. And I'll still check the CPU just in case this weekend. I'll report back any updates once I have them. 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Same Day Service when purchased in-store 4 hours or more before store closing If your processor is faulty, we can easily replace it with a new one. $79.99 SKU: 963033 PICK UP IN 18 MINUTES Please Select Your Store CA - Tustin CO - Denver GA - Duluth GA - Marietta IL - Chicago IL - Westmont KS - Overland Park MA - Cambridge MD - Rockville MD - Parkville MI - Madison Heights MN - St. Louis Park MO - Brentwood NJ - North Jersey NY - Westbury NY - Brooklyn NY - Flushing NY - Yonkers OH - Columbus OH - Mayfield Heights OH - Sharonville PA - St. Davids TX - Houston TX - Dallas VA - Fairfax   $39.99 Diagnostic Required Parts Pricing Will Vary We require a complete and thorough Diagnostic in order to determine the cause of your problem, and the appropriate repairs needed to get you back up and running. Operating system won't load? Your CPU may need to be replaced. Don't worry. After a complete diagnostic, our expert technicians can replace your defective CPU. HOW IT WORKS BRING IN YOUR DEVICE Bring in your equipment and any necessary parts, cables or accessories DISCUSS SYMPTOMS Let us know any additional details of the repairs needed WE DO THE REPAIR Our certified technicians will get to work fixing your equipment PICK UP YOUR DEVICE We'll contact you when your equipment is ready to be picked up Summary After a diagnostic (additional fee), your technician will research appropriate and compatible CPUs for your computer We stock many varieties of cooling solutions for desktops and can order heatsinks for every major brand of laptop In some cases the root cause of your issues might not be your CPU - your technician will cover all of this with you after your diagnostic is completed CPU Repair Details This service applies to replacing a failed CPU in your computer after a paid and performed diagnostic We first clean the inside of the PC with compressed air and a vacuum, the chassis is then grounded to minimize the risk of static damage - the side panels of your PC, the heatsink assembly, and the CPU are then removed, where applicable The new CPU is installed and secured into the socket using the respective locking mechanism The heatsink contact surface and new CPU are cleaned with alcohol, and a fresh application of thermal paste is applied to the CPU The heatsink is connected to the motherboard and rested on top of the CPU - the system is then plugged in and powered on for a Power On Self Test (POST) - If the system fails POST, the heatsink and CPU are removed and reseated to verify pin integrity and contact If the system passes POST, the heatsink is mounted via the appropriate mounting mechanism - the case is reassembled and closed, and a PC-Doctor diagnostic is booted to verify CPU functionality After passing the preliminary diagnostic, the system is booted into the operating system and given a burn-in test which runs the new CPU at a high frequency to verify stability and thermal load - this test typically takes one to two hours, although water-cooled systems will require more extended tests What We Need From You The device you want us to repair for you and the power cord and adapter if it is a laptop or an all-in-one desktop We'll Keep You Updated When you drop off your equipment with us, we will do a quick check to see that everything is in order, then send you a text to give you a place to respond to ask any questions during the diagnostic and repair After diagnostics are completed (generally same day), we will contact you via text or email with the results of our diagnostics and the cost to repair your computer If we have to order any parts from a vendor (generally just laptops), we will provide you a timeframe at this point Installation of a replacement CPU is typically done between two to four hours If we have to contact you due to any incompatibility or issues, your technician will call or text you with updates as they progress to figure out the best way to proceed Once the work is completed, we will call, text, or email you when the computer is ready to be picked up, and the final cost Our Expertise Since 1979 we’ve been selling, repairing, upgrading, and building computers. Our COMPTIA A+ and OEM certified technicians have repaired and upgraded thousands of PCs for personal and business use. Our long standing, and deep industry relationships enables us to become authorized service providers for the following top-tier brands. For Your Health & Safety All employees are required to wear masks After the work is complete, your device will be cleaned and disinfected for your health and safety Visiting the Micro Center Knowledge Bar Select this service online, include a full and complete problem description for our technicians, then you can either use the quick drop off service, or book an appointment if you need to speak with one of our technicians - if you are bringing in an Apple PC please schedule an appointment to speak with a technician when you arrive QUICK DROP OFF 1. Go to the Quick Drop Off Desk 2. We'll scan the barcode in your confirmation email. 3. Leave your device with us Reviews Questions and Answers Similar Services View recommended items Next View next items Recommended Item Hard Drive Replacement Service $79.99 Recommended Item PC Fan Replacement Service $19.99 Recommended Item Laptop Screen Replacement Service $99.99 Recommended Item SSD Replacement Service $99.99 Recommended Item Power Supply Replacement Service $59.99 Popular Services View recommended items Next View next items Recommended Item Cell Phone and Tablet Data Recovery Service $950.00 Recommended Item NAS and RAID Data Recovery Service $1,000.00 Recommended Item In-store Data Recovery Service under 1TB $200.00 Specifications Service: CPU Replacement Service If your processor is faulty, we can easily replace it with a new one. SKU: 963033 Price: $79.99 Duration: Same Day Service Subcategory: Hardware Repair Fulfilled: In-Store Parts Warranty: 90 days for replacements parts, if your device is not covered under a manufacturer's warranty, or extended service plan. Warranty for retail parts are covered under the manufacturer's warranty and will vary by part and manufacturer. Labor Warranty: 30 Days Service Terms and Conditions I understand and agree to the following Micro Center Service Terms and Conditions: Data Loss - The requested repair and / or installation service may cause partial or complete data loss from my equipment. I must maintain backups and assume all responsibility from restoring any lost software or data. Micro Center assumes no responsibility from any software program, data loss or restoration. Online Fee Collection – For certain diagnostic and repair services, Customer may tender a fee to Micro Center through an online payment transaction at the time of the online scheduling of a service appointment. Customer understands that the fee charged in an online payment transaction is merely an estimate based on Customer’s self-assessment of the necessary diagnostic and / or repair services for his or her computer. There may be circumstances where a Customer’s computer cannot be repaired, must be rebuilt or upgraded, or requires additional services not included within the scope of the Customer’s self-assessment because of the age of the computer, the obsolescence or unavailability of repair parts, the receipt of additional instructions from the Customer, or other factors. Customer acknowledges and agrees that the online payment transaction amount is merely an estimate and that Micro Center may charge and collect for the actual fees incurred for diagnostic and repair services performed on Customer’s computer Partial Builds – A Customer may request that Micro Center assemble or build parts of a computer, but not all of a computer (a “Partial Build”). In Partial Build service transactions, it is contemplated that the Customer, or a third party at the Customer’s request, will complete the construction of the computer, which may include the installation of additional parts to the computer or the modification of the computer. The Limited Warranty described below will not apply to a Partial Build service transaction. In addition, after a Partial Build is picked up by a Customer, any subsequent diagnosis, troubleshooting, or repairs to the computer, which may require additional or replacement parts, will be subject to additional fees or charges, all at Customer’s expense. Custom Builds – A Customer may request that Micro Center assemble or build a custom computer (a “Custom Build”). Micro Center will charge the Customer a custom build fee for the assembly or building of a Custom Build computer (the “Build Fee”). Once Micro Center collects the Build Fee, either through an online payment transaction or at the service counter, the Build Fee is not refundable under any circumstances. A Customer will have five calendars days after being notified by Micro Center that a Custom Build computer is ready for pick-up to retrieve the Custom Build computer. If a Customer fails to pick up the Custom Build computer within this five-day period, Micro Center may sell the Custom Build computer in its retail store and, in such case, will refund the cost of the parts used to assemble the Custom Build computer to the Customer requesting the Custom Build, but in no event will Micro Center refund the Build Fee or the cost of any software installed on the Custom Build computer. Warranty Repairs - A valid proof of purchase must be provided before any Warranty work will be performed. I understand that the operating system, other software, software configurations, and Virus detection / removal are not covered by manufacturers’ warranties and that normal Non-Warranty diagnostic and repair rates will apply. Non-Warranty Repairs - A Diagnostic fee is due for diagnosing and confirming the problem. If I choose to have the equipment repaired, additional charges apply at normal posted shop rates. I understand that a payment in full is due before any equipment can be released by Micro Center. Data Backup Service - Micro Center can provide limited data file backup of specific data files only (“Data Backup Service”). It does not include the programs or program files that created the data. However, Micro Center can reinstall these programs for an additional fee if the original disks and license keys are provided. In order to provide the Data Backup Service, the hard drive with the files to be backed up, must be functioning and accessible. For an additional charge, Micro Center can also supply the storage media for the backup service. Micro Center disclaims any warranty of any kind of the Data Backup Service or of the integrity or completeness of any data backup files. Micro Center assumes no responsibility for any software programs, data loss or restoration. In no event shall Micro Center be held liable for any consequential or incidental damages due to lost data, lost programs or defects in parts or labor. The total liability of Micro Center shall in no event exceed the total sum paid to Micro Center for the data file backup service. The customer acknowledges that the estimated and actual fees reflect this limitation of liability and risk. Parts Used for Repair - I understand that New, Used, Reconditioned or Re-manufactured parts may be used in Warranty and Non-Warranty repairs. Non-Return of Parts - I understand that all Warranty parts and any Non-warranty parts replaced under and Exchange or core basis will not be returned to me. Other replaced parts will be tendered to me. Unclaimed Equipment: Security Interest - Customer grants Micro Center a security interest in and to the equipment to secure the payment of the charges incurred hereunder. Any items which have not been claimed and paid within thirty (30) days of my declining repair or Micro Center’s first notification that the work is complete shall be considered abandoned by the customer. I authorize Micro Center to dispose of this abandoned equipment including all data and programs. Limited Warranty - Micro Center warrants that all replacement parts used will be free from defects in material or workmanship for 90 days from date of purchase. Micro Center will repair or replace, at its option, parts found to be defective during that time period. Repair and installation labor is warranted for 30 days from date of purchase and is limited to a redo of the original work. THIS LIMITED WARRANTY IS EXCLUSIVE AND IS IN LIEU OF ALL OTHER WARRANTIES, OTHER THAN THE WARRANTY OF TITLE, WHETHER ORAL OR WRITTEN, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING THE WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND OF FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE. Some states do not allow limitations on how long an implied warranty lasts or do not allow the exclusion or limitation of incidental or consequential damages, so any such limitations or exclusions may not apply to you. This warranty gives you specific legal rights. You also have other rights which may vary from state to state. Limit of Liability - In no event shall Micro Center be liable for any consequential or incidental damages due to lost data / programs, defects in parts or labor. The total liability of Micro Center shall in no event exceed the total sum paid to Micro Center for this repair. Customer acknowledges that the estimated and actual fees reflect this limitation of liability and allocation of risk. Complete Agreement - The foregoing Service Terms and Conditions and the Service Check-in Form constitute the entire agreement between the parties, except that the Customer specifically authorizes Micro Center to provide services that Customer may request by telephone. 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You can view our Privacy Policy and information reqarding our use of cookies here. X Accept Privacy Policy and Terms X Temporarily Hide Alert Community Article [CLOSED] Share your PC Building Horror Story and enter to win a 3070 Graphics Card! - Page 2 — Micro Center Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker {$smarty.capture.menu} Activity Categories Discussions Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker Home › Contests › Past Contests [CLOSED] Share your PC Building Horror Story and enter to win a 3070 Graphics Card! «1234567…10» Comments Hybridx ✭ January 12 My nephew had been begging my sister in law for a computer for months and I had  just upgraded from an i5 9400 and 1660 to a 9700k and 2070 and told his mother to buy him a case and power supply and I'd build him a computer from my old parts for Christmas. She did it and I built the computer and as I'm putting the glass side panel back on to close it up, the glass completely shatters and puts a few shards of glass in my hands. The best part was when I recoiled from the glass breaking and bumped into my 32" 165hz 1440p monitor and knocked it off my desk and destroyed the panel. Good times. 1 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook EddyTowers ✭ January 12 Wanting to get in to PC gaming, I decided to build a personal rig. Nothing too fancy, just enough to run the TWO games I ever play. After looking around on YouTube, I saw someone that had built a decent machine for about 300USD. I figured i would give it a try. I purchased a refurbished Dell that he recommended with the intent of upgrading the PSU and GPU. I also picked up a GTX 1070. Imagine my surprise when the GPU wouldn't even fit in the case. Ok, so I'll just buy a different case that it can fit in and it would look nicer, right? The new case did fit the GPU, but then I found out the stock Dell mobo wouldn't work with the PSU, so I bought a newer MoBo that would work. This is where I learned about CPU chipsets, and how the mobo i JUST bought wouldn't take the CPU from the Dell. Off to buy a new CPU. I should be good now, right? WRONG! Now the RAM sticks won't work because the Dell had DDR3 and the ASUS mobo has DDR4. Back to MicroCenter, I guess... Picked up a couple of case fans, and oh look! An RGB CPU cooler on sale. Hell yea! Get home to get everything installed, and why the hell does this ASUS mobo not have 5v RGB headers? I guess this 12v will work. It did. For a split second. Then a montage of  trying to figure out why the RGB on the stupid fan isn't lighting up. Ok. I give up. As long as everything works and is functional.  All in all, a $300 build ended up being closer to $700 and I didn't get to use a SINGLE component from the Dell. Not even the HDD. I decided to switch that out for an M.2 SSD.  One good thing from all of this was the experience though. I am now confident enough to build a PC for my girlfriend to start streaming. I also learned that doing ANYTHING with a Dell is a PITA. 1 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Christian_Agama ✭ January 12 Basicly one time when I had all my parts in the box and hadn't start to build my pc my dog must have loved amd so much that he just couldn't wait for me to open the box and decided to chew it up completely with the cpu and destroyed basicly half the pins and the cpu even had a dent on it luck I had warrenty and told them the story the laughed and told me i could get a refund luckily. There was another time that I forgot to peal off the platic on the new motherbaord i had gotten because i planned to upgrade almost very part in my pc. The plastic caught on fire for a quick second while i was playing luckily nothing on the motherbaord got destroyed and the fire touched the graphics card and took it out to see if anything was harmed but luckily nothing was it was an only 1050ti. The Last one would probobly have to be that my glass pannel on my PC Case had shattered on the way to my house thanks to UPS kicking it around luckily someone at nzxt was very nice and helped me get a replacement. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Deaner1121 ✭ January 12 One time I was cleaning my pc and decided to clean my radiator, and the condensation started to drip onto the radiator and I was almost certain it was leaking. Luckily nothing bad happened to it. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Lokithepoodle ✭ January 12 My horror story is not as grand as others, but tragically I almost lost a motherboard. You see, my coolermaster rgb cpu cooler has springs in the screws that screw into the motherboard. You see, I was shaking while pushing down on the springs hoping I would not break my motherboard and squish my CPU. Everything turned up alright though! 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Zenno ✭ January 12 Imagine ordering all your parts for your first PC build expecting it to come within a few days but the pandemic shipping time became a week. THEN, you realize that the case that you ordered was NOT a glass panel version. Yeah, all that RGB and no glass panel to show it off. Now, you've already dedicated a whole day to build this PC only to find out you didn't have the right case. No biggie, just start with the motherboard and attach everything to it. Wait for new case in the meantime. Oh Wait... RAM is 3600mhz but the motherboard only handles up to 3200mhz?! Well well well... GUESS WHO'S NOT BUILDING A PC TODAY. Yeah, that is the horror story of my first day expecting to build my first PC but it took more like half a month to get all the parts right and installed. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook OJ1010 ✭ January 12 Back around 2018, I visited my cousins house late afternoon. However, this time instead of entering the house and seeing him playing on his PC, I was bestowed the sight of his whole PC disassembled and layed out. This was worrying because 1: I thought something broke, and 2: My cousin wasn't good with computers in the first place, so him having taken the whole thing apart was concerning. After talking with him about it, I realized the issue was clear, when pressing the power button on the PC, the whole system would flash and spin up for a second, and then immediately shut down. With the issue then realized, I took to trying to fix it. I tried everything from reseating the CPU to unplugging the GPU, which of course didn't do anything. Eventually after searching the internet for a while, I found a forum post (ironically on this forum) about someone with the same issue. The person later said that they found the issue to be with their power supply. Once I told my cousin this, he started to deny the claim that I made, saying it was stupid and unreasonable, because if anything his PSU should be the last thing to break. For context, my cousins pc compromised of a i5 6600k and a msi mobo that he got in a combo from ebay, a used 1060, a used case, and a used HDD. The only new thing in the PC was a EVGA 600w B1 psu from amazon. After trying to fix it for another hour, he eventually told me to find out a way to test his psu. This lead to me having to use the dreaded paperclip method (which I found out doesn't actually work all the time, so it was pure luck that it was actually the psu broken), and as a result my cousin was convinced that his psu was actually gone. Warranty was gone of course so he had to get a new one, which is still going to this day. TL:DR: I wasted about 6 hours, and almost risked being electrocuted by a psu just to troubleshoot a pc I already knew the solution of.   0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Mikes1479 ✭ January 12 I decided to build my first PC when I started college about 5 years ago in 2017. I spent months researching all the parts, getting the best deals that I could, and overall just taking my time with the process so I could build a $1000 PC for really good value. The build itself went pretty well I guess, it took me roughly 4 hours because it was my first time building a PC and I was really trying to be careful and do everything neatly / correctly. I had an AMD Ryzen Spire Cooler that literally took me about an hour to finally install on my CPU because you had to screw things in a very certain way and I was just getting frustrated. All in all, the build itself went fine and the PC ran well. So fast forward about a month, I am gaming on my new PC having fun when I reach over to grab a sip of water and knock over the cup, the water went ALL into my PC and I had a moment of sheer terror and panic. It took me about 5 seconds to process what had just happened but my first instinct was to power off the PC and unplug it which is luckily what you're supposed to do. I sat there in shame for about an hour pretty certain that I just fried several part of my PC because I heard water hit the fan of my GTX 1070ti and figured that it was all over. I did some research and learned the best thing you can do is wipe the parts with alcohol to avoid mineral buildup from the water, and pretty much just give it plenty of time to dry while no electricity is being supplied. Somehow, 5 days later when I finally had the courage to turn on my PC and see if I fried it or not, everything was working perfectly fine. I was extremely surprised and lucky to learn that this was the case. A big lesson I had that day is no more open cup beverages near my PC, from now on I exclusively drink water from blender bottles. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Pete_T ✭ January 12 About 5 years ago my wife and decided to put all of our pictures that we had scanned along with home movies into a new computer that I was building.  We had decided to use PLEX to be able to watch the movies and view the photos on a computer or TV.  As I finished up building and testing the new PC, I pulled my old mechanical hard drive out of my old PC that had all the scanned pictures and home movies.  The hard drive was one of those old slow ones, 5,400 rpm I think, so we decided to get a new faster and larger hard drive to transfer into the new PC.  I set everything up on the floor and put the old drive on a box as I began the transfer using a USB cable.  My wife walked into the room and was on the phone so she did not see the cord.  She got caught up on the cord and tripped which then whipped the old hard drive off the box it was sitting on and it hit the floor with a screeching sound.  That was the end of that hard drive and about 75% of the information had not transferred to the new drive yet.  Luckily we still had the pictures and home movies so I spent the next 2 months transferring everything directly to the new computer (this time with an extra backup drive).   0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook BigThickCheese ✭ January 12 Last Wednesday I was built my first PC. After installing everything, it would not power on; no fans spinning, no RGB, no noises. I thought that I had installed my 24pin header incorrectly, but that didn't work. I unplugged and replugged everything at least 5 times, but nothing. However, when I was checking the connections in the back, I hit the psu cable, from the outlet, with my hip. Hitting this, I learned that I simply did not plug the psu in all the way. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Gaild ✭ January 13 This was early 2020 when this happened my mom gave me her old pc it had a amd phenom ii x4 with it and decided to get a xfx rx 570 because i wanted to game or sum shit but i got the card  from wish for only 75 bucks and it took about 7 months . And when it arrived it looked like it got  kicked repeatedly from a football field down and back. When i opened the box the card looked fine but very used and when i installed it and download the drivers the card overheat and catched fire killed the pc got pissed off called the seller got my money back. (btw dont buy shit from wish) 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook matcha ✭ January 13 During the summer I upgraded my Ryzen 5 1600 to a 3600. I planned on using the 1600 on a build that I would give to my girlfriend. I unscrewed the cooler, but the cooler was stuck to the cpu. I ended up ripping out the cpu from the socket and yeeted the cpu+cooler. Pins got bent and I had to get another cpu for my gf's build  🙃🙃🙃 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook RichardFingers ✭ January 13 I think probably about 6-7 years ago when I did my first build. Nothing special, it was a MSI z97 Gaming 5, i5 (forget which version), 32 gb ram and either a 670ti or 780ti. I had just started getting into PCs/components and what not and was all super pumped when the installation went flawless. Booted it up, got the BIOS squared away and got Windows installed. Got some things installed and carried on for a few days. One thing I noticed was the EXTREME amount of lag, rando BSODs, freezing/locking up things just not working. I'm like, uhhh what? I got 32gb ram, I should be fine, plus I'm barely doing anything. Found out that I actually installed a 32 bit version of windows and not 64 bit. Go me. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Bcomputer ✭ January 13 I was building one of my first builds ever and it was a AMD K-5 chip. I got it all together and left it on for the burn-in. Was running smooth. After the burn-in time I shut it down for the first time. I notice a burning plastic smell. The chip had melted the processor socket. Back in the day's when cooling wasn't so good. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook 1TM ✭ January 13 Building a PC with Asus Prime X370-pro board, I didn’t realize the voltage regulation modules’ heat sinks are razor-sharp, so cut my finger pretty deep while connecting the 8-pin CPU power cable.  0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook PRIVATE_MURRAY ✭ January 13 My Thermal paste was dried out... I tried to substitute with toothpaste .. I made a minty winterfresh smoke screen  0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook 4t4k3 ✭ January 13 It took 2 weeks to get all the parts to my pc, then we realized we got the wrong case, then when we plugged everything in the pc wouldn't turn on. Turns out this was because we plugged the psu cables into the graphics card. Then we couldn't find a way to get the bios into the pc. Lastly, while I went to buy the case I saw that there were like 8 3060ti graphics cards in stock, 2 weeks after I had paid for a rog 2060. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook DaxterbeerGMS ✭ January 13 My worst accident setting up my monitors was attaching my monitors onto a triple monitor stand.  When I was mounting backplate, I dropped a screw into the vent of my monitor.  I spent an hour trying to use a magnet and shaking the monitor for the screw to come out before carefully disassembling.  When I got the screw out and decided to test out the monitor, I saw a massive black bar across my screen.  I spoke to ASUS about repairs and they were kind enough to send me not a replacement, but an upgraded one since I was in the warranty period but they didn't carry the exact model.  That is how I went 1080p 180hz 24" to 2160p 165hz 27" by accident. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Zelda ✭ January 13 After placing the CPU in the socket I pulled the tension lever down and heard the sound of metal screeching 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Fudonim ✭ January 13 Finished building the important bits of the computer and I wanted to install some cheap LED strips for that sweet RGB (This was before everything had RGB on it). We soldered some old phone wires as a power source and hot glued the wires to the edge of the case so it wouldn't snag when I removed the glass panel. Some of the hot glue went into the PSU vent and when I tried to clean it out, I only made it worse. Had to buy a new PSU. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook JoPaMi ✭ January 13 I was building my first PC, around 2007, and I ordered all the components, the best I could afford (and some I couldnt really afford) and watched every YouTube video I could find about putting this together. I had the newest bios ready to flash, my static bracelet, nothing was going to go wrong. I literally found every possible video on what NOT to do.  So when I went to put the the CPU in the AM2 slot I was so nervous that I dropped it WAY too early with my shaky hands... You might be able to guess what happened. CPU would not go in because the pins were bent in one of the corners. I spent hours trying to bend them back. I had to wait another couple of weeks (no 2 day shipping then) to get a new CPU.  0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook AdamT ✭ January 13 Young and dumb, I bought a SFF barebones system (case, MB, PS, and fans all integrated essentially) and stuffed it full of a 10k RPM drives running raid 0, couple big storage drives, top of the line GPU, and a screamer CPU with a beefy active cooler.  Everything worked, the noise sounded like a jet engine, and thermals weren't something I knew to care about. The issue was the power supply... I didn't know it was an issue until I heard the pop and smelled the magic smoke escape a few months down the road. Given that it was a special PS, I couldn't just buy a replacement and the OE wouldn't warranty it. So for the next few years I ran a separate external PS chasing all the cables back inside as the system slowly died from poor thermals. Life less, don't buy non-standard equipment, buy a bigger power supply, add more fans, and make your system quiet. Above all else, if you let the magic smoke out, you are boned. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook She_Devil ✭ January 13 I built my first two computers back to back in 2013 for myself and my boyfriend at the time after having saved months and months to afford the build quality I wanted for them. I still use that computer to this day (though, I recently rebuilt it into a new case with some aesthetic additions) and have built about a dozen other computers for friends/family since. Each time it's always been a fun process, fine tuning a build for someone and what they need or intend to use it for is one of my favorite things aside from actually building it. I've always put off upgrading my own PC since I'm cheap and it has always done what I needed it to do. "If it ain't broke, don't fix it" - that whole thing. And it sure has been a champ all of these years. It's only been recently in the last couple of years that it has struggled at all with games or programs.. Plus it's almost sentimental being my first build ever. Now that my build is definitely what one would call "dated", I finally sucked it up and began my newest build. It was actually really exciting to finally be building a new computer for ME instead of for someone else, and really go all out with it and with the budget. I started this build last November, and it's still unfinished. For the first time ever (or at least that I've ever seen in all of these years building) half of the parts I'm looking for are sold out, the other half are marked up in price, and every worthwhile graphics card is out of stock and being scalped lol. So.. I have patiently waited, and waited.. and waited. Still waiting.. Grabbing every little piece I could until now. There  have been minimal to no restocks on most things and it seems like a lot of things have been going wrong in my build since. Two cases arrived with deep scratches down the face of the tempered glass. The extension cables I purchased had half of the pins hanging out of every cable when I opened the box. My motherboard's RAM slots are slightly too close to the CPU so my AIO pump doesn't fit quite right without pushing on them.  Not quite a horror story, just little things that certainly make this build stand out from the others. I still am excited to finally finish it whenever that time comes. Crossing my fingers for an early restock of the 3080s this year. I am most excited that I will be giving my old PC to my brother so that he can finally start getting into PC games with us. 1 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook MarcosV406 ✭ January 13 Last year when I was building my PC, I had plugged in my 24 pin connector the wrong way and I thought it just wouldn't go in. I then proceeded to jam the plug in, so the pcb with the header snapped off and I had to get a new motherboard. (I was inexperienced and the motherboard was an asus z490-e) 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Techdreamer ✭ January 13 edited January 19 I wanted to share a "moment" I had for a build that I sold to a client law firm. Sometimes I will build RAIDED windows file sharing systems for small offices that need data security and redundancy and not necessarily a windows server. I used to use the microcenter branded external enclosures as a 3rd backup for these computers. One Friday afternoon I went to install a new external backup on one of my built systems that was about 3 years old that was located in a small closet that had no light. I was using a small flashlight that was dying (no cell phone with lights at that time had a Palm Treo), and I decided to shutdown their system to clean out all the dust on the inside. When I brought the computer back to the closet and started to plug the power cord, battery ups, key board, mouse, screen and my new external backup drive I turned on the system and "zap", smelled smoke and before I could shutdown the system, it was off. Growing up in a pretty tough neighborhood I had never been frozen with fear, until now.  I was on my hands and knees and I couldn't move. Here is a law firm that could sue me out of existence. I realized that I had plugged the power cord from the external backup into the PS2 port on the file server and fried the board. I mean it was a perfect fit, I thought it was the keyboard, which actually was USB, but the mouse was PS2. After what seemed like an eternity I finally got up and walked over calmly to one of the attorneys and stated that I needed to do some major work on their computer and that they would be down for couple hours or more. The attorney said that he was closing early and that I could stay and lock up. I asked if I could just take their system to my office and do I what I had to, and do a better cleaning and come back the next day. "No problem!" he replied. Thank God the RAID was fine and the backups were intact. I rushed to Microcenter and built them a brand new file sharing server and had it running the next day including the database app and remap all drives. So from that point on I never used those back up drive enclosures and removed them from my other clients, I also learned what "frozen with fear" really meant.   0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Anan ✭ January 13 A day of Joy "Shocked." Back from the era of The Sims2 i had a very reliable PC. It was this system i purchased a dedicated graphics card. In time i found myself changing out for more ram and adding hard-drives.  The system was a dual core like many of that time. While many improvements where being made i felt for what i needed it was able to perform. With life i became a father. As grand and unrelated as this sounds highs and lows are very true. For our first Mothers day we felt the integrity of family values to introduce distance relatives to our newborn. While visiting family we receive every alert possible. Someone had broke into our apartment. As most would expect the house was torn to shreds. Jewelry gone, Finances gone, Electronics gone. Well, I would say all electronics were taken however in all the damage was my computer. Kicked over and unresponsive. Based on its beige look the people that acted upon this felt not only was it not worth it to take but not worth it to leave alone. The event is traumatic let alone being our first mothers day, consoling a crying wife and talking with police officers that are suppose to take note to what was taken while calling me a liar in the process. Specifically over owning a Xbox 360 although the Kinect was left along with the original package. At that time computer store have been running commercials of this exact situation. I wouldn't have felt a need to upgrade if This had not happened. However digital copies of family photos and video are forever lost. *** First thought, Best thought. The birth of a child is a great time trial. With this concept i had the time to go back to school and into my career. Success achieved i was able to do what i felt was best to provide for my family and give opportunity for my child. In making sure i was not being financially responsible i felt building a respectful system could be planned. In time The build was complete. This was my first SLI build tucked what i thought was safely behind a living room PC. The weekend of its completion with a now running child a family dinner is in progress. Talking with the mother in law. Her intrigue is upon this bright flashing system. During the conversation i tell her how i had it connected to the TV as it is capable of 4k gaming but may still be sticking out too far as a hazard. While these words are coming out my mouth my daughter runs into the living room knocking the entire desktop off the table to the ground. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook zaidaraid ✭ January 14 Short story, iv'e waited and saved up to get a pc for about half a year and now all the gpu's are at a substantial price. Now I am considering to go with a GT 1030 or a RX 550 until the pc market goes down.😭 But the RTX 3070 would help me build my first pc as a beginner and I have watched every LTT, BITWIT, and nerd a budget's videos on YT.😤 I know this isn't a horror story but i'm really trying my best to get a graphics card in 2021.😓 ✋🏾 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook wra18th ✭ January 14 I bought all of the components to build a Pentium 233Mhz setup with a Tyan motherboard and 8 gigs of RAM. Had everything new. I powered it up and it and it ran for a few minutes and then the motherboard started smoking. Then the CPU stated smoking. Then the PSU stated smoking. I guess there was something wrong with the motherboard. When I called the vendor for a warranty claim they accused me of overclocking. I had never heard of overclocking before. Fortunately, they honored the warranty and replaced everything. But now I wanted to learn about overclocking. And with time I got good at it. But I haven't OC'd anything in 6 or 7 years. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook kparada0421 ✭ January 14 i just put in a new aio and as soon as i turned it on it leaked  0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook DrShrapnel ✭ January 14   The summer before last I was upgrading my PC to a full AMD build. Got a great deal at Microcenter for a Ryzen 3600 and 5700XT combo. I'd entered all of my info into PC Parts Picker beforehand and it looked like my 550 Watt PSU was enough to handle the job. After completing the build I was running into an issue where I'd be in the middle of playing a game and BOOM! - it would crash to desktop. Sometimes my entire PC would shut down. Looking online revealed that AMD's drivers were causing a lot of issues for new 5700/5700XT owners. The drivers were awful, but when it was all working, it was a tremendous value for the money. So for a short time I was on the AMD forums as well as Subreddit reading about others having issues with these new GPUs. It was frustrating, but man, I was really happy with the performance for the price. Fix this AMD!  Eventually the crashing was just too much.  I'd had enough and was going to go back to Nvidia. Microcenter had a 2070 Super in stock, and even though it was a heck of bit pricier than my 5700XT, I wanted stability. So off to Microcenter I went and picked up the 2070 Super. When I arrived home I put it in my PC and WHAM! Big crash and my motherboard had a red light. What in the WideWide World of Sports is goin' on here??   I didn't know, so I brought my entire PC to Microcenter to get looked at. Turns out I fried my motherboard. *sob*  This dummy didn't stop to think that the 2070 Super required an even larger PSU. So I had to use the savings I had set aside for a future upgrade to buy a new Motherboard and a 750 Watt PSU. Then it hit me...all of that time I thought it was AMD's drivers, and here it was my Motherboard shutting everything down so I didn't damage my system. It just didn't dawn on me because at the time people were having A LOT of issues with AMD's drivers. So lesson learned - don't skimp on the PSU!   0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook «1234567…10» This discussion has been closed. 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