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Showing 120 of 104 for “filament”
Community Article Understanding 3D Printer Filament Types — Micro Center Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker {$smarty.capture.menu} Activity Categories Discussions Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker Home › How to & Technical Guides › 3D Printers Understanding 3D Printer Filament Types MicroCenterOfficial admin April 2021 edited April 5 in 3D Printers By Ben Price 3D printers have quickly risen in popularity in recent years, with more than 1.4 million 3D printers shipping in 2018 alone. As the 3D printer market has grown, many new 3D printer enthusiasts have found themselves a bit confused when it comes to 3D printer filament - knowing the difference between filaments and knowing which one is best for their particular 3D printers. Today, we’ll be discussing 3D printers, different types of filament, and helping you decide which type of filament is best for your 3D printer.   What is a 3D Printer? 3D printers create three-dimensional solid objects from a digital file. The creation of 3D printed objects is achieved through something called additive processes, which involve laying down successive layers of material until the full 3D object is created. 3D printing enables users to create complex shapes and objects, all whilst using less material than traditional manufacturing methods, creating endless possibilities for printing.  In recent years, 3D printers have gotten more and more affordable, with many models being as cheap as $300 or less. They are relatively easy to use and maintain, and by far the most expensive part of owning a 3D printer is dealing with the 3D printer’s filament. Which is why knowing what filament works best for you can help save money and headaches. If you're looking for a more in-depth look at 3D printers, be sure to check out our Choosing a 3D Printer guide!   Different Types of 3D Printer Filament 3D printer filament is the material that is used by a 3D printer to print objects. Printer filament is to 3D printers as printer ink is to traditional printers. Printer filament comes in all sorts of different shapes and sizes and can vary quite a bit in price, size, color, weight, and toxicity levels. Whilst there are many different filament types available, the two most common types of filament are ABS (acrylonitrile butadiene styrene) and PLA (polylactic acid). Most basic 3D printers have been designed to use one of these two types of filaments, so these are really the only two that you need to know much about.  In terms of weight, filament is sold in spools that range from 0.5 kilograms to 2 kilograms. The filament comes in two thicknesses, either 1.75 millimeters or 3 millimeters. Most filaments, however, are of the 1.75-millimeter variety. With this said, let’s take a look at the different types of filaments starting with ABS and PLA.   ABS (Acrylonitrile Butadiene Styrene) Filament Inland 1.75mm Red ABS 3D Printer Filament ABS filament is one of the most common filaments around and is the same plastic that LEGOs are made out of. The filament is as popular as it is because everything printed with it is nontoxic and very durable. The filament has a fairly high melting point, ranging from 210 degrees to 250 degrees Celsius. The downside to using this filament is that ABS tends to emit a rather unpleasant odor while printing, so if you should probably plan on printing in a well-ventilated room if using this filament. In addition, the bottom corners of this filament have a knack for curling upward just a bit, especially if using a non-heated printing bed.   PLA (Polylactic Acid) Filament Inland 1.75mm Light Blue PLA+ 3D Printer Filament PLA filament, comparatively, has a lower melting point than ABS, ranging between 180 degrees and 230 degrees Celsius. One huge plus of this filament is that it is plant-based and biodegradable, something that can’t be said about other 3D printer filaments. Additionally, PLA filament is harder than ABS, prints without any warping, and is just overall generally easier to work with than ABS.   PETG Filament Inland 1.75mm Translucent Blue PETG+ 3D Printer Filament PETG (polyethylene terephthalate mixed with glycol) is a thermoplastic polymer that is most commonly used for drink bottles. PETG became quite a bit more popular during the coronavirus epidemic as it can be easily sanitized and, as a result, has been very useful for medical applications like face shields. PETG filament is resistant to water and very high temperatures (with a very high printing temperature that ranges from 230 to 250 degrees Celsius). Additionally, it has good electrical properties, has stable dimensions, and is incredibly sturdy.  One big difference that PETG filament has from both ABS and PLA filaments is that it can only be printed while using 3D printers that have fully enclosed printing spaces. PETG has the strong durability of ABS and the easy printability of PLA filaments, so as a result, it’s not surprising that it is one of the most popular among professionals looking for reliable filament.   TPU Filament Inland 1.75mm Black TPU 3D Printer Filament TPU filament, or thermoplastic polyurethane, is perhaps the most unique of all of the 3D printing filaments, with its defining characteristic is incredible flexibility. In addition, TPU is resistant to abrasion, oil, chemical, and wearing, which makes it a perfect fit for use in the automotive industry. In addition to being very resistant to high temperatures, it is also resistant to very low temperatures as well, meaning that it won’t become brittle and harder to work with in the cold. The downside to using TPU filament is that, due to its flexibility, it's not as easy to print as other filament materials. Like PETG, TPU filament is also required to be printed within an enclosed 3D printing space.   Which 3D Printer Filament Should I Use? So overall, which is the best 3D printer filament you should use? Well, it entirely depends on your 3D printing needs as well as the type of 3D printer that you own. An easy way to narrow down your choice is simply whether or not you have a 3D printer that has an enclosed printing space versus one that has an open printing area. If your 3D printer has an open space, you need to purchase either ABS or PLA filament. If your 3D printer is a model with an enclosed printing area, you need to use PETG or TPU filament. From there, figure out what type of objects you’d prefer to print. If you want to print something that is more durable and you own a printer with an open space, then ABS filament will probably be your best pick. If you’d rather print something that is biodegradable, then PLA is the option that you should go with. If you have a 3D printer with an enclosed printing space and want to print something that’s highly durable and won’t warp over time, then PETG is the option for you. And if you’re looking to create 3D objects that have more flexibility to them, then TPU filament is your best choice. Happy printing! 2 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Categories 8K All Categories 1.2K The Blog 63 What's Trending 15 Past News and Updates 185 How to & Technical Guides 13 Computer Hardware 119 Software 3 Home Office 6 Networking 2 Audio/Visual 2 Home Automation 20 3D Printers 20 Maker 32 PC Build Guides 120 Reviews & Buying Guides 55 Build Showcase 27 Contests 48 Past Contests 1.6K The Community 1.9K General Discussion 105 New Members 248 Consumer Tech 68 Prebuilt PCs and Laptops 100 Software 8 Audio/Visual 27 Networking & Security 1 Home Automation 3 Digital Photography 3 Content Creators 22 Hobby Boards & Projects 33 3D Printing 69 Retro Arcade/Gaming 92 All Other Tech 1.6K Store Information and Policy 78 Off Topic 17 Community Ideas & Feedback 120 Your Completed Builds 2.9K Build-Your-Own PC 1.9K Help Choosing Parts 251 Graphics Cards 200 CPUs, Memory, and Motherboards 73 Cases and Power Supplies 23 Air and Liquid Cooling 26 Monitors and Displays 34 Peripherals 19 All Other Parts 29 Featured Categories We love seeing what our customers build Submit photos and a description of your PC to our build showcase Submit Now Looking for a little inspiration? See other custom PC builds and get some ideas for what can be done View Build Showcase View builds by: AMD Processors Intel Processors RTX 3090 RTX 3080 RTX 2080 Ti RTX 2080 Super RTX 2070 Super RTX 2070 RTX 2060 Super Radeon RX 5700XT Radeon RX 5700 Air Cooled Liquid Cooled SAME DAY CUSTOM BUILD SERVICE If You Can Dream it, We Can Build it. Services starting at $149.99 More Details Micro Center Homepage Desktops Laptops Computer Parts Computer Accessories Custom PC Builder Build Showcase Networking Electronics 3D Printing Service, Upgrades & Repairs Laptop Battery Replacement Laptop Screen Repair Virus and Malware Removal Hard Drive Recovery and Backup Apple MacBook Repair Custom Built PCs Schedule an Appointment © Vanilla Foundation Theme 2022 Powered By Vanilla Community Article Inland filament types and properties — Micro Center Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker {$smarty.capture.menu} Activity Categories Discussions Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker Home › Consumer Tech › 3D Printing Inland filament types and properties AlexPasseno Columbus OH Store Associate March 2021 in 3D Printing PLA: Cheap, low temperature resistance, and relatively brittle, this material is a WONDERFUL all rounder with amazing dimensional accuracy and some of the highest tensile strength of most hobby materials most people start printing with this and stick to it because of its cost effectiveness and versatility PLA+: very similar to PLA, this material has a toughening agent added to it to give it a lot more of an impact resistance (at the cost of some tensile strength usually) i tend to also like the color selection in + compared to regular a lot better! Silk PLA: A PLA polyester composite this material comes out incredibly shiny! because of its polyester it needs to be printed hotter than your standard PLA (i generally tend to find 235-245 work really well) and even then it tends to suffer from layer adhesion, not great for functional prints but it looks BEAUTIFUL Lite PLA: this is a PLA that has less pla (lite) and more of a plant fiber filler, this comes out a beautiful matte/semigloss while also being really nicely compostable! not great for strength however. Glass PLA: Transluscent PLA, i tend to find it needs higher temperatures. PETG: alot gummier of a plastic typically the same material they make water bottles out of, very chemical resistant higher temp resistance and completely UV stable, can be more challenging than PLA biggest advice for troubleshooting bed adhesion is to lower the bed away from the nozzle a hair or two. Food safe however the process of 3d printing is very rarely ever food safe. generally agreed to be one of the only filaments aquarium safe PETG+: generally alot more forgiving than petg standard, has a much longer shelf life to it, better spooling, not as susceptible to higher fan speeds so generally a lot easier to print with than petg, MINIMAL temp resistance and impact resistance improvements over standard ABS : An older material to be sure, can be incredibly challenging to print out on most hobbyist machine and is very susceptible to drafts or unwanted cooling, warpage is so bad that it can actually warp along the layer lines causing delamination at the worst and weak layer adhesion normally, uv sensitive so unless painted or black it will become brittle in direct UV light over time, great temp resistance though! soluble in acetone so a common practice is using acetone vapors to melt the layers together giving it a smooth injection molded look (though it very rarely improves strength) ASA: very similar to abs, and in most circles is starting to overtake abs, a tad less prone to warping but completely uv stable. Polycarbonate: generally viewed as the end all be all for hobbyist strength printing, can be very challenging to print out much in the same ways ABS or ASA is, its a lot stiffer than abs and layers adhere to each other a lot more reliably. UV stable. Nylon: there are a lot of different blends of nylon that all have different printing properties and post print properties, though generally seen as incredibly impact and wear resistant (while also being self lubricating!) great for gears/pinions/hinges and other pieces that will rub up against things, nylon in general is a very forgiving material to print as long as its printed dry, while all filaments have a certain shelf life to them (usually in the scale of months) Nylon tends to absorb enough moisture to make it unprintable in roughly 3 hours, to alleviate this you need to print it directly from a dry box. Carbon Fiber: Carbon fiber materials are added to a variety of bases to add stiffness to the original material, ive seen PLA, PETG, ABS, NYLON, and even PC, the carbon fiber we stock is a nylon base, just note ANY AND ALL CARBON FIBER COMPOSITE MATERIALS REQUIRE A WEAR RESISTANT NOZZLE. PP: our newest material this is a weird one, its flexible without being terribly elastic, completely non-bioreactive so its amazing for biomods, aquariums, or hydroponics systems. (i tend to use it for custom pipe fittings) very good chemical resistance, great for pipe fittings, living hinges, and other applications that needs a wear resistant flexible piece. bed adhesion is weird needing ~90 on the bed and CLEAR PACKING TAPE (clear packing tape is usually made of polypropylene so the pp filament will fuse to it nicely) and a very low hotend temp of ~160 -RESINS- Standard: Hum Drum run of the mill prints not too much to say about it. Bio/E-resin: a bio resin ""Technically"" safer to work with (still ALWAYS recommend following all safety procedures, smell is alot less offensive however. Water washable: a very thin resin can be cleaned with water however using alcohol still works a little better, its a very VERY easy resin to clean up if you spill it. Jewelry casting resin: a nice replacement for lost investment wax casting, does require a furnace to burnout the printed positive from the plaster negative but once you burnout the positive you get an empty mold to pour molten gold/silver/pewter into! expensive up front material cost but overall produces a really clean no residue burnout and one sale will generally make up the material cost. 1 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Comments LandShark admin March 2021 edited March 2021 Hey @AlexPasseno Welcome to the community! Glad to have you aboard! What is your favorite to work with? I noticed that you mentioned liking the PLA+, but if you had your choice of all of the above types, which would be your go-to? Also, what are your thoughts on TPU? https://media.giphy.com/media/TdXuJirQBcR52psi7l/giphy.gif 1 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook AlexPasseno Columbus OH Store Associate March 2021 Love petg+! i do alot of fish tank printing, so petg is my go to and the + just makes it so much easier to print, TPU is gimmicky but if you have a use case it gets the job done! also with fish tanks pp is a good alternative since that is also food safe while having alot of the same properties 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook LandShark admin March 2021 Very cool. Would love to see some of your projects! Great post! 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Categories 8K All Categories 1.2K The Blog 64 What's Trending 15 Past News and Updates 185 How to & Technical Guides 13 Computer Hardware 119 Software 3 Home Office 6 Networking 2 Audio/Visual 2 Home Automation 20 3D Printers 20 Maker 32 PC Build Guides 120 Reviews & Buying Guides 55 Build Showcase 27 Contests 48 Past Contests 1.6K The Community 1.9K General Discussion 105 New Members 248 Consumer Tech 68 Prebuilt PCs and Laptops 100 Software 8 Audio/Visual 27 Networking & Security 1 Home Automation 3 Digital Photography 3 Content Creators 22 Hobby Boards & Projects 33 3D Printing 69 Retro Arcade/Gaming 92 All Other Tech 1.6K Store Information and Policy 78 Off Topic 15 Community Ideas & Feedback 120 Your Completed Builds 2.9K Build-Your-Own PC 1.9K Help Choosing Parts 251 Graphics Cards 200 CPUs, Memory, and Motherboards 73 Cases and Power Supplies 23 Air and Liquid Cooling 26 Monitors and Displays 34 Peripherals 19 All Other Parts 29 Featured Categories We love seeing what our customers build Submit photos and a description of your PC to our build showcase Submit Now Looking for a little inspiration? See other custom PC builds and get some ideas for what can be done View Build Showcase View builds by: AMD Processors Intel Processors RTX 3090 RTX 3080 RTX 2080 Ti RTX 2080 Super RTX 2070 Super RTX 2070 RTX 2060 Super Radeon RX 5700XT Radeon RX 5700 Air Cooled Liquid Cooled SAME DAY CUSTOM BUILD SERVICE If You Can Dream it, We Can Build it. Services starting at $149.99 More Details Micro Center Homepage Desktops Laptops Computer Parts Computer Accessories Custom PC Builder Build Showcase Networking Electronics 3D Printing Service, Upgrades & Repairs Laptop Battery Replacement Laptop Screen Repair Virus and Malware Removal Hard Drive Recovery and Backup Apple MacBook Repair Custom Built PCs Schedule an Appointment © Vanilla Foundation Theme 2022 Powered By Vanilla Community Article 1.75mm Filament inventory problems — Micro Center Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker {$smarty.capture.menu} Activity Categories Discussions Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker Home › General Discussion 1.75mm Filament inventory problems EricMeyer ✭ May 2020 edited June 2021 in General Discussion I totally understand that there is currently a shortage of 1.75mm 3dprinter filament, but it would be nice if the website reflected the actual inventory.   My local Dallas Microcenter shows several types of 1.75mm filament being in stock, but when I went to the store they had none.   They even went into the back to check and they had none in stock at all.   I have been checking the site daily to see when they have more in stock, but I can't really trust the site for accurate data.    Any idea when to expect a shipment of Inland PETG or PLA+ filament? 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Comments TSTonyV admin May 2020 Hello @EricMeyer! Welcome to the Community.  Filament is an item we'll typically try to restock within a week or so, but that can vary. With how high demand filament is right now, it may take longer than normal to get stock back in. That said, if you can private message me your contact information, I could pass a message to our managers at the store for you to see if they can provide any more information for you or let you work with a sales consultant to find a solution.  0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Categories 8K All Categories 1.2K The Blog 64 What's Trending 15 Past News and Updates 185 How to & Technical Guides 13 Computer Hardware 119 Software 3 Home Office 6 Networking 2 Audio/Visual 2 Home Automation 20 3D Printers 20 Maker 32 PC Build Guides 120 Reviews & Buying Guides 55 Build Showcase 27 Contests 48 Past Contests 1.6K The Community 1.9K General Discussion 105 New Members 248 Consumer Tech 68 Prebuilt PCs and Laptops 100 Software 8 Audio/Visual 27 Networking & Security 1 Home Automation 3 Digital Photography 3 Content Creators 22 Hobby Boards & Projects 33 3D Printing 69 Retro Arcade/Gaming 92 All Other Tech 1.6K Store Information and Policy 78 Off Topic 15 Community Ideas & Feedback 120 Your Completed Builds 2.9K Build-Your-Own PC 1.9K Help Choosing Parts 251 Graphics Cards 200 CPUs, Memory, and Motherboards 73 Cases and Power Supplies 23 Air and Liquid Cooling 26 Monitors and Displays 34 Peripherals 19 All Other Parts 29 Featured Categories We love seeing what our customers build Submit photos and a description of your PC to our build showcase Submit Now Looking for a little inspiration? See other custom PC builds and get some ideas for what can be done View Build Showcase View builds by: AMD Processors Intel Processors RTX 3090 RTX 3080 RTX 2080 Ti RTX 2080 Super RTX 2070 Super RTX 2070 RTX 2060 Super Radeon RX 5700XT Radeon RX 5700 Air Cooled Liquid Cooled SAME DAY CUSTOM BUILD SERVICE If You Can Dream it, We Can Build it. Services starting at $149.99 More Details Micro Center Homepage Desktops Laptops Computer Parts Computer Accessories Custom PC Builder Build Showcase Networking Electronics 3D Printing Service, Upgrades & Repairs Laptop Battery Replacement Laptop Screen Repair Virus and Malware Removal Hard Drive Recovery and Backup Apple MacBook Repair Custom Built PCs Schedule an Appointment © Vanilla Foundation Theme 2022 Powered By Vanilla Community Article new inland filament manufacturer? — Micro Center Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker {$smarty.capture.menu} Activity Categories Discussions Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker Home › Consumer Tech › 3D Printing new inland filament manufacturer? 3dp ✭ October 2020 in 3D Printing I was buying the Natural Inland PLA, it came in a white box, and it was awesome.  Now I just bought some natural PLA and it came in a grey box and it is different and is more brittle.  The suggested temperature ranges are also different, so it seems like an entirely new formula.  The white box says "new and improved formula" on it and the blue box doesn't say that.  So my question is, why is there such a big difference and what should I expect going forward? 1 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Comments 3dp ✭ October 2020 Micro Center support just got back to me.  It looks like the newer grey box is the new Natural PLA, so it does in fact look like the formula has changed.  Just beware, the plastic is a lot more brittle than it used to be. 1 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook TSKevinG admin October 2020 Good Morning @3dp I do apologize for the delay in response on the issue with the filament.  I do see where did did speak with someof our technical consultants by email on he issue.  We are going to forward this information  to try and get more information on the filament.  Again, i do apologize for the issue you have had with this filament and please let us know fi you hae nay other questions or concerns. 1 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook NickBiederman admin October 2020 @3dp The formula was changed by our supplier due to a shortage of raw materials. We'll be returning to the original formula once the raw materials are available to our supplier.  1 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook AlexPasseno Columbus OH Store Associate March 2021 Check out or PLA+ for less brittle PLA though 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Categories 8K All Categories 1.2K The Blog 64 What's Trending 15 Past News and Updates 185 How to & Technical Guides 13 Computer Hardware 119 Software 3 Home Office 6 Networking 2 Audio/Visual 2 Home Automation 20 3D Printers 20 Maker 32 PC Build Guides 120 Reviews & Buying Guides 55 Build Showcase 27 Contests 48 Past Contests 1.6K The Community 1.9K General Discussion 105 New Members 248 Consumer Tech 68 Prebuilt PCs and Laptops 100 Software 8 Audio/Visual 27 Networking & Security 1 Home Automation 3 Digital Photography 3 Content Creators 22 Hobby Boards & Projects 33 3D Printing 69 Retro Arcade/Gaming 92 All Other Tech 1.6K Store Information and Policy 78 Off Topic 15 Community Ideas & Feedback 120 Your Completed Builds 2.9K Build-Your-Own PC 1.9K Help Choosing Parts 251 Graphics Cards 200 CPUs, Memory, and Motherboards 73 Cases and Power Supplies 23 Air and Liquid Cooling 26 Monitors and Displays 34 Peripherals 19 All Other Parts 29 Featured Categories We love seeing what our customers build Submit photos and a description of your PC to our build showcase Submit Now Looking for a little inspiration? See other custom PC builds and get some ideas for what can be done View Build Showcase View builds by: AMD Processors Intel Processors RTX 3090 RTX 3080 RTX 2080 Ti RTX 2080 Super RTX 2070 Super RTX 2070 RTX 2060 Super Radeon RX 5700XT Radeon RX 5700 Air Cooled Liquid Cooled SAME DAY CUSTOM BUILD SERVICE If You Can Dream it, We Can Build it. Services starting at $149.99 More Details Micro Center Homepage Desktops Laptops Computer Parts Computer Accessories Custom PC Builder Build Showcase Networking Electronics 3D Printing Service, Upgrades & Repairs Laptop Battery Replacement Laptop Screen Repair Virus and Malware Removal Hard Drive Recovery and Backup Apple MacBook Repair Custom Built PCs Schedule an Appointment © Vanilla Foundation Theme 2022 Powered By Vanilla Community Article HDPE 3D Printer Filament Substitute — Micro Center Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker {$smarty.capture.menu} Activity Categories Discussions Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker Home › Consumer Tech › 3D Printing HDPE 3D Printer Filament Substitute Chris10Ireland ✭ December 2021 in 3D Printing So I'm working on a prototype for my design but the final product will more than likely be made of High-Density Polyethene. The problem is that HDPE is SUPER difficult to print with and very difficult to even find. I am wanting to know if anyone has any good substitute ideas that would be similar to HDPE? I've already bought TPU filament but was wondering if there were any other ideas. The main component needed is a plastic that is thin yet flexible. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Answers GoatForHire Irvine, TX ✭✭ December 2021 I would say PETG is pretty similar to HDPE. Here is a comparison chart between the two: https://www.makeitfrom.com/compare/Glycol-Modified-Polyethylene-Terephthalate-PETG-PET-G/High-Density-Polyethylene-HDPE 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook TSKevinG admin December 2021 Good afternoon @Chris10Ireland Thank you for contacting micro center. I have sent a message directly to you so we can get more information and try to assist you better to find the item you are looking for. Once you have received the message please respond with the information requested. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Categories 8K All Categories 1.2K The Blog 64 What's Trending 15 Past News and Updates 185 How to & Technical Guides 13 Computer Hardware 119 Software 3 Home Office 6 Networking 2 Audio/Visual 2 Home Automation 20 3D Printers 20 Maker 32 PC Build Guides 120 Reviews & Buying Guides 55 Build Showcase 27 Contests 48 Past Contests 1.6K The Community 1.9K General Discussion 105 New Members 248 Consumer Tech 68 Prebuilt PCs and Laptops 100 Software 8 Audio/Visual 27 Networking & Security 1 Home Automation 3 Digital Photography 3 Content Creators 22 Hobby Boards & Projects 33 3D Printing 69 Retro Arcade/Gaming 92 All Other Tech 1.6K Store Information and Policy 78 Off Topic 15 Community Ideas & Feedback 120 Your Completed Builds 2.9K Build-Your-Own PC 1.9K Help Choosing Parts 251 Graphics Cards 200 CPUs, Memory, and Motherboards 73 Cases and Power Supplies 23 Air and Liquid Cooling 26 Monitors and Displays 34 Peripherals 19 All Other Parts 29 Featured Categories We love seeing what our customers build Submit photos and a description of your PC to our build showcase Submit Now Looking for a little inspiration? See other custom PC builds and get some ideas for what can be done View Build Showcase View builds by: AMD Processors Intel Processors RTX 3090 RTX 3080 RTX 2080 Ti RTX 2080 Super RTX 2070 Super RTX 2070 RTX 2060 Super Radeon RX 5700XT Radeon RX 5700 Air Cooled Liquid Cooled SAME DAY CUSTOM BUILD SERVICE If You Can Dream it, We Can Build it. Services starting at $149.99 More Details Micro Center Homepage Desktops Laptops Computer Parts Computer Accessories Custom PC Builder Build Showcase Networking Electronics 3D Printing Service, Upgrades & Repairs Laptop Battery Replacement Laptop Screen Repair Virus and Malware Removal Hard Drive Recovery and Backup Apple MacBook Repair Custom Built PCs Schedule an Appointment © Vanilla Foundation Theme 2022 Powered By Vanilla Community Article Overland Park Store: PVA filament — Micro Center Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker {$smarty.capture.menu} Activity Categories Discussions Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker Home › General Discussion Overland Park Store: PVA filament David_B ✭ April 2020 edited June 2021 in General Discussion This store use to stock this.  Now it says it's not carried?  Can anyone confirm if it'll be re-stocked in Overland Park? https://www.microcenter.com/product/485656/inland-175mm-natural-pva-3d-printer-filament---05kg-spool-(11-lbs) Thanks! 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Answers TS_BryantA admin April 2020 @David_B Good evening and thank you for your question regarding Filament. Unfortunately this item is listed that it will not be restocked in the Overland Park location. I apologize for the inconvenience, and if you have any additional inventory questions please let us know.  0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook David_B ✭ May 2020 Sure, thanks. Why is it not carried any more?  You carry dual filament printers would you stop carrying PVA?  Primary us for dual filament printer is soluble support material.  PVA is used for water soluble support material.  Also worth mentioning other Microcenter stores still appear to be carrying it.  Confused; huge selection of filament why leave out PVA all the sudden and why only this store?  Why not stock a few spools? 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Categories 8K All Categories 1.2K The Blog 64 What's Trending 15 Past News and Updates 185 How to & Technical Guides 13 Computer Hardware 119 Software 3 Home Office 6 Networking 2 Audio/Visual 2 Home Automation 20 3D Printers 20 Maker 32 PC Build Guides 120 Reviews & Buying Guides 55 Build Showcase 27 Contests 48 Past Contests 1.6K The Community 1.9K General Discussion 105 New Members 248 Consumer Tech 68 Prebuilt PCs and Laptops 100 Software 8 Audio/Visual 27 Networking & Security 1 Home Automation 3 Digital Photography 3 Content Creators 22 Hobby Boards & Projects 33 3D Printing 69 Retro Arcade/Gaming 92 All Other Tech 1.6K Store Information and Policy 78 Off Topic 15 Community Ideas & Feedback 120 Your Completed Builds 2.9K Build-Your-Own PC 1.9K Help Choosing Parts 251 Graphics Cards 200 CPUs, Memory, and Motherboards 73 Cases and Power Supplies 23 Air and Liquid Cooling 26 Monitors and Displays 34 Peripherals 19 All Other Parts 29 Featured Categories We love seeing what our customers build Submit photos and a description of your PC to our build showcase Submit Now Looking for a little inspiration? See other custom PC builds and get some ideas for what can be done View Build Showcase View builds by: AMD Processors Intel Processors RTX 3090 RTX 3080 RTX 2080 Ti RTX 2080 Super RTX 2070 Super RTX 2070 RTX 2060 Super Radeon RX 5700XT Radeon RX 5700 Air Cooled Liquid Cooled SAME DAY CUSTOM BUILD SERVICE If You Can Dream it, We Can Build it. Services starting at $149.99 More Details Micro Center Homepage Desktops Laptops Computer Parts Computer Accessories Custom PC Builder Build Showcase Networking Electronics 3D Printing Service, Upgrades & Repairs Laptop Battery Replacement Laptop Screen Repair Virus and Malware Removal Hard Drive Recovery and Backup Apple MacBook Repair Custom Built PCs Schedule an Appointment © Vanilla Foundation Theme 2022 Powered By Vanilla Community Article 3d printing filament out of stock — Micro Center Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker {$smarty.capture.menu} Activity Categories Discussions Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker Home › Consumer Tech › 3D Printing 3d printing filament out of stock Johnny2dollar Sterling Heights, MI, USA ✭ January 25 in 3D Printing I have noticed much lower stock of filament at my local Microcenter store. Most of the filament colors and types are out of stock in store and online. Is this a supplier change issue or is printing filament getting discontinued?  0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Best Answer Shanedor90 ✭ February 11 Answer ✓ Johnny2dollar according to my research eSun. And I can confirm I bought a roll of eSun white PETG, it arrived on a VERY similar spool, had a slightly shinier finish off the spool but ended up being the EXACT same color and finish when printed. In fact it even printed with Exact same speed, temps, and retraction but with a smidge less stringing. The first thing I printed with it I even printed half with Inland then partway through paused and switched to eSun, and when it was done it was impossible to tell where the switch was. It is a bit more expensive BUT if your like me and started a huge project that will require 2-3 spools and Microcenter is out and not restocking in your area, this is how I got out of my predicament. 1 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Answers Ian admin January 25 Greetings. I'm not aware of any changes or issues to our 3D printer filament, I would say filament is just in high demand with our recent deals /coupons for 3D printers. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Grunthos Minneapolis, MN ✭ February 1 https://community.microcenter.com/discussion/comment/39529#Comment_39529 This has been going on for weeks now. There is simply nothing in stock, and inventory is not being replenished. My local store (St Louis Park, MN) has virtually no PLA left at all. Is there any update on when we can expect to see shelves restocked? 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Johnny2dollar Sterling Heights, MI, USA ✭ February 1 Grunthos is correct. My local store, Madison Heights, MIchigan, has almost no PLA and only a moderate selection of PLA +. Been like this for several weeks. Tons of black PLA+, which does workout for me. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Zyltech1fan ✭ February 4 Just went to our Micro Center here in Houston Texas, we have zero PLA filament left, last month had hundreds of rolls.  0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Shanedor90 ✭ February 7 Same as Zyltech1fan here!! I live in Houston, working on a project and bought white PETG last week and our store almost had nothingthen. Went yesterday to get another roll and there was like 5 rolls of PETG most of which was 2.85 and bad colors (no white), 2-3 TPU spools, and then a bunch of protopasta. Was pretty bummed. Seems like a supply issue because this has been going on since before xmas here, but given they don't manufacture the stuff I'm just gonna order from the company that makes inland for them. Same stuff, just different label and get it in no time. Do a bit of googling and you can figure out the company😁 Happy printing. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Johnny2dollar Sterling Heights, MI, USA ✭ February 7 Shanedor90, who manufactures for inland? 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Grunthos Minneapolis, MN ✭ February 7 Inland appears to be MicroCenter's store brand, although I don't know who actually manufactures it. It's in stock on Amazon right now, and when you buy it there, it shows "Sold by: Micro Center" on the order. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Shanedor90 ✭ February 11 Oh and just for Funsies while I was at it I ordered some of eSun's "Glass Purple" Semi-Transparent PETG to make some stuff with!! It was on backorder but should get it Sunday! If it prints as good as their PLA+ and solid PETG do, I might have a new go to filament color for a while (was a little WAAAAY too into Prusament PPE Orange for a while there). 1 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Shanedor90 ✭ February 12 Semi good news fellas. I was driving around earlier and found myself down by our Houston Microcenter. Decided "why not I'm here anyway". They did a VERY small but still significant restock. They had ONE roll of PETG+ that I nabbed (this project is gonna take 3 rolls total) and some other good stuff (prolly 20 rolls of various PETG and 30-40 PLA)!! If your like me and have made yourselves some Masterspools, there was quite a bit of Spooless PLA as well. Side Note: This PETG+ has the finish much more like the eSun I have been using and TBH it had the most perfect winding I have EVER seen in a spool. Threw it on an hour ago printing same settings as the eSun and it's printing flawlessly. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook doscomputer ✭ April 11 My local microcenter OP, KS has been cleared out of PETG and TPU for over a month now. I know the PLA is rebranded eSUN for sure but I have no idea about the others. Sucks for me because I really like this inland branded filament and have previously bought a lot of it. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Categories 8K All Categories 1.2K The Blog 64 What's Trending 15 Past News and Updates 185 How to & Technical Guides 13 Computer Hardware 119 Software 3 Home Office 6 Networking 2 Audio/Visual 2 Home Automation 20 3D Printers 20 Maker 32 PC Build Guides 120 Reviews & Buying Guides 55 Build Showcase 27 Contests 48 Past Contests 1.6K The Community 1.9K General Discussion 105 New Members 248 Consumer Tech 68 Prebuilt PCs and Laptops 100 Software 8 Audio/Visual 27 Networking & Security 1 Home Automation 3 Digital Photography 3 Content Creators 22 Hobby Boards & Projects 33 3D Printing 69 Retro Arcade/Gaming 92 All Other Tech 1.6K Store Information and Policy 78 Off Topic 15 Community Ideas & Feedback 120 Your Completed Builds 2.9K Build-Your-Own PC 1.9K Help Choosing Parts 251 Graphics Cards 200 CPUs, Memory, and Motherboards 73 Cases and Power Supplies 23 Air and Liquid Cooling 26 Monitors and Displays 34 Peripherals 19 All Other Parts 29 Featured Categories We love seeing what our customers build Submit photos and a description of your PC to our build showcase Submit Now Looking for a little inspiration? See other custom PC builds and get some ideas for what can be done View Build Showcase View builds by: AMD Processors Intel Processors RTX 3090 RTX 3080 RTX 2080 Ti RTX 2080 Super RTX 2070 Super RTX 2070 RTX 2060 Super Radeon RX 5700XT Radeon RX 5700 Air Cooled Liquid Cooled SAME DAY CUSTOM BUILD SERVICE If You Can Dream it, We Can Build it. Services starting at $149.99 More Details Micro Center Homepage Desktops Laptops Computer Parts Computer Accessories Custom PC Builder Build Showcase Networking Electronics 3D Printing Service, Upgrades & Repairs Laptop Battery Replacement Laptop Screen Repair Virus and Malware Removal Hard Drive Recovery and Backup Apple MacBook Repair Custom Built PCs Schedule an Appointment © Vanilla Foundation Theme 2022 Powered By Vanilla Community Article PLA and PLA+ Filament Frequently Asked Questions - Micro Center Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker {$smarty.capture.menu} Activity Categories Discussions Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker PLA and PLA+ Filament Frequently Asked Questions - Micro Center

This article contains some of the most frequently asked questions about PLA and PLA+ Filament that we get at our Micro Center stores.


Q: What is PLA filament?

A: PLA filament (Polylactic Acid) is a type of thermoplastic that is derived from renewable resources such as corn starch or sugar cane. It is used in 3D printing and is typically used for food containers, biodegradable medical implants, models, and prototype parts.

Q: Why should I use PLA filament?

A: PLA filament is very easy to work with which makes it perfect for beginners in the world of 3D printing. It is less prone to warping than other filaments.

Q: Why shouldn’t I use PLA filament?

A: While a great filament overall, PLA is prone to clogging and attracts water molecules, making it very brittle over time. PLA clogs are usually easy to resolve however and gives you valuable experience in learning how to troubleshoot your printer.

Q: What temperatures do I print PLA at?

A: While the exact temperature will vary based on your printer, the exact filament you are using, and your preferences, the recommended range of temperature for PLA is 205-220°C, and 60-80°C for the bed temperature. You are not required to use a heated bed; however, it does make the process much easier.

Q: What is the difference between PLA and PLA+?

A: PLA and PLA+ are actually very similar filaments. PLA+ however, has extra ingredients added to it to alter its properties. Unfortunately, there is no standard of PLA+, so each company will add its own ingredients, which will change certain properties, and may change the temperatures you will need to use to print with.

Q: What sizes of filament do I need?

A: The size of filament that you need will vary based on your printer. Currently, there are 1.75mm and 2.85mm filaments available. Usually, printers will only support one of these sizes, so ensure you are using the correct size.

Q: Why is there 3.0mm filament listed online?

A: 3.0mm filament is another name for 2.85mm filament. It was originally used as a short-hand for 2.85mm. However, this confused some manufacturers as they started making actually 3.0mm filament (rather than 2.85mm filament), so be sure to check the size in the specifications for the filament. This will normally be denoted as "true diameter" and should be listed at 2.85mm rather than 3.0mm. 1.75mm filament, however, does not have this issue, and you can purchase it without concern.

Q: What print speed should I use when printing with PLA?

A: The exact speed will vary based on your printer and your personal preference, however typically 30mm/s - 40mm/s is the recommended print speed.

Q: What retraction settings should I use?

A: Retraction settings (speed and length) will vary greatly based upon your printer, what type of extruder you are using, and what filament you are using. To fine-tune this based on your printer, you can follow this guide: https://www.matterhackers.com/articles/retraction-just-say-no-to-oozing.

© Vanilla Foundation Theme 2022 Powered By Vanilla Community Article How to Load Filament into the PowerSpec Ultra 3D Printer - Micro Center Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker {$smarty.capture.menu} Activity Categories Discussions Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker How to Load Filament into the PowerSpec Ultra 3D Printer - Micro Center

This article covers how to load filament in the PowerSpec Ultra 3D 1.0 and 2.0 printers. This also works for similar models of 3D Printers.


1.  Power on the 3D printer.

2.  Select Tools from the Printer menu.


3.  Select Filament.


4.  Select load left or load right. Standing in front of the printer, the extruder on the left will be the left extruder, and the extruder on the right will be the right extruder.


5.  The printer will now heat up to 230°C.


6.  Once the preheating hits 100%, load the filament. Do this by pushing the filament into the top of the extruder.


7.  The filament will catch and the filament will slowly start oozing out of the nozzle.


8.  If the filament does not ooze out of the nozzle, try again. If it still does not work, the extruder may be clogged.

© Vanilla Foundation Theme 2022 Powered By Vanilla Community Article How to Unload Filament in the PowerSpec Ultra 3D Printer - Micro Center Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker {$smarty.capture.menu} Activity Categories Discussions Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker How to Unload Filament in the PowerSpec Ultra 3D Printer - Micro Center

This article describes how to unload filament in the PowerSpec Ultra 3D 1.0 and 2.0 printers. 


1.  Power on the printer.

2.  Select Tools from the Printer menu.


3.  Select Filament.


4.  Select load left or load right. Standing in front of the printer, the extruder on the left will be the left extruder, and the extruder on the right will be the right extruder.


5.  The printer will now heat up to 230°C.


6.  Once the printer completes heating, push down the lever to the left/right of the extruder.


7.  While holding down this lever, pull the filament out of the extruder.


8.  If the filament will not come free of the extruder, the lever is pressed down all the way. If it still will pull out of the extruder, there is a clog at the hot end.

© Vanilla Foundation Theme 2022 Powered By Vanilla Community Article Making an Eco-Friendly 3D Printer Ecosystem — Micro Center Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker {$smarty.capture.menu} Activity Categories Discussions Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker Home › What's Trending Making an Eco-Friendly 3D Printer Ecosystem MicroCenterOfficial admin April 22 edited April 22 in What's Trending 3D printing is a wonderful technology that has revolutionized rapid prototyping, small-scale manufacturing, and allowed individuals to produce custom products on a one-off basis. But, like any technology, it isn’t without its hiccups. Packaging and failed prints can produce plastic waste, and running a 3D printer inefficiently can cost energy. Thankfully, though, there are a few simple ways you can make your 3D printing ecosystem eco-friendly! Recycling Packaging and Spools Traditionally, filament comes in packages on injection molded plastic spools. These spools are lightweight, inexpensive, and durable. However, these spools aren’t always recyclable. Some are made from materials that can’t be recycled. Some are made from recyclable materials but are not accepted by municipal recycling programs because they are unmarked. Even if a spool is recyclable, there is a limit to the number of times it can be recycled before deteriorating beyond the point of usefulness. Thankfully, there is a lot that can be done with these plastic spools instead of just sending them to the landfill. Plastic spools can be reused for a number of purposes. They’re great for storing Christmas lights and short extension cords. You can use your 3D printer to print drawers that fit in a filament spool, like these from Thingiverse user MistrYpsilon. You can stack them or glue them together and use them as small storage shelves. But even with all these possible uses, we all end up with more spools than we need eventually. Enter: cardboard spools. Empty spools can be a great start for many organization projects. Cardboard spools are nothing new, but they are becoming more common. Protopasta and other companies have been using cardboard spools for years, and Inland PLA is now available on cardboard spools. Durability is often cited as a concern with these spools, but I have not experienced any issues with cardboard spools. Protopasta uses corrugated cardboard, while Inland uses solid cardboard, and both have worked easily with my printer. And cardboard can easily be recyclable in all areas and breaks down much faster than plastic if it must be sent to a landfill. But if you don’t want to use a spool at all, there’s also spooless filament. Inland’s filament now comes on an easily recycled cardboard spool Spooless filament is another option for reducing the number of spools used. While trying to print without a spool tends to end poorly, there are a number of options for reusable spools the spooless filament can be loaded onto. These spools are made of 2 or more pieces allowing them to be disassembled to load new filament. Micro Center carries this spool made by Inland, or you can print your own using a model like this one from Thingiverse user danielbeaver. Spooless filament reduces waste by only requiring one spool for an infinite amount of filament. Spooless filament tends to be slightly cheaper per kilogram as well. Factoring in the cost of the reusable spool, printing with spooless filament becomes cheaper than printing with spooled filament after 3kg. Spooless filament doesn’t come on a spool, but it’s easily loaded onto a commercial or 3D printed spool. If you still have a surplus of plastic spools, you may be able to turn your spools into a filament manufacturer for reuse. The Columbus-based filament company IC3D accepts spools from IC3D, Printed Solid, and Inland filament in exchange for a discount on their recycled PETG filament. They don’t run this program all the time, so you may need to check their website or sign up for their newsletter to be notified when the program is open. You can find more information about this program here. Reusing Extra Print Materials While the steps above help reduce the waste from packaging 3D filament, they don’t help with the waste created by failed prints, supports, and prototypes. Unfortunately, most plastics used in 3D printing are not recyclable through municipal recycling programs. PLA, ABS, nylon, and polycarbonate are not recyclable through most municipal recycling programs. Polypropylene can be recycled in some municipalities, but few people use it for 3D printing. While PETG is chemically similar to the recyclable plastic PET, it’s typically not accepted for recycling as it is difficult to separate from PET and causes contamination. But all is not lost: there is still ways to recycle and reuse filament. Some PLA is compostable, but generally only under industrial conditions. Backyard compost piles tend to be too cold for PLA to decompose. If your city offers composting as an option for waste disposal they may accept your PLA scraps. This can be a great way to keep plastic waste from ending up in the landfill. If you’re careful to keep your scraps separated by material type, it’s possible to recycle them into usable filament at home. The process starts by taking sorted material and shredding it into small pieces. These pieces are then extruded through a hotend similar to the hotend on a printer. Once cooled, the extruded filament can be spooled up and used for future prints. There are a number of commercial and DIY options for recycling machines. Some integrate the shredder and extruder into one machine, though most require purchasing a shredder separately. With a powerful enough shredder, some of these systems can even be used to make filament from old spools. Commercial options range from simple desktop units to larger production machines. Filabot is one of the most well-known commercial options for recycling filament at home. It’s a modular system that can be expanded to include a filament spooler and a cooling system. It takes about an hour to produce 1kg of filament on the Filabot. Alternatively, Wellzoom’s desktop filament extruder is a more entry-level option but takes a bit longer to produce 1kg of filament. Like the Filabot, Wellzoom offers an optional spooler. ReDeTec and 3Devo offer high-end desktop units for those who are really passionate about their prints and the environment. When combined with a cooler and automatic spooler, the Filabot creates an efficient system for recycling filament. You can also create your own, with DIY options ranging from kits that produce professional-looking systems to hardware store contraptions. The Felfil Evo is one of the more professional-looking options on the market. It can be expanded with a spooler and grinder to create an efficient system for recycling at home. It’s also available preassembled. Filastruder is one of the most well-known names in the home filament-making game and they offer a spooler to make winding your filament onto a spool easier. If you’re looking for a more hardcore DIY option, ianmcmill on Instructables has put together a guide on building an extruder from scratch. Though a bit rough around the edges compared to some commercial offerings, ianmcmill’s DIY extruder is cheap and effective. Reducing waste with print settings It’s even possible to make your actual prints more eco-friendly! The default settings used in Cura and most other slicers are great for general-purpose printing but can be wasteful for some prints. When doing large prints that don’t need much strength like desk organizers or storage containers, you can often get away with dropping infill to 5% or 10%. This not only reduces the amount of material used but can dramatically reduce print time. Shorter prints equate to less energy used to run motors and heat beds and hotends. Other than infill, the settings for these two prints are identical. Reducing infill from 20% to 7% cut print time by 7 hours and filament used by almost ⅓. Reduce, Reuse, Recycle! Reducing waste created by 3D printing doesn’t have to require big changes. Switching to filament that’s sold on cardboard spools or spooless filament doesn’t change your workflow, and might even save you money. For high-volume printers, a filament extruder can be a great way to reduce waste and provide a continuous source for filament that’s great for prototypes or other quick prints. Using efficient settings can help too. Reducing infill speeds up prints and reduces the amount of material used, both of which can reduce the environmental impact of 3D printing.  Looking for more information about Raspberry Pi? We’ve got a Hobby Board section of the community, as well as Hobby Board guides like The Definitive Micro Computer Buying Guide, Raspberry Pi Basics, and How to Create a Retro Game Console with Raspberry Pi! And if you can’t find what you’re looking for, don’t hesitate to post a new discussion and the Community will be happy to help! 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Comments Simeon ✭✭ April 24 good project for the weekend 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Leave a Comment Rich Text Editor. To edit a paragraph's style, hit tab to get to the paragraph menu. From there you will be able to pick one style. Nothing defaults to paragraph. An inline formatting menu will show up when you select text. Hit tab to get into that menu. Some elements, such as rich link embeds, images, loading indicators, and error messages may get inserted into the editor. You may navigate to these using the arrow keys inside of the editor and delete them with the delete or backspace key. 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Categories 8K All Categories 1.2K The Blog 64 What's Trending 15 Past News and Updates 185 How to & Technical Guides 13 Computer Hardware 119 Software 3 Home Office 6 Networking 2 Audio/Visual 2 Home Automation 20 3D Printers 20 Maker 32 PC Build Guides 120 Reviews & Buying Guides 55 Build Showcase 27 Contests 48 Past Contests 1.6K The Community 1.9K General Discussion 105 New Members 248 Consumer Tech 68 Prebuilt PCs and Laptops 100 Software 8 Audio/Visual 27 Networking & Security 1 Home Automation 3 Digital Photography 3 Content Creators 22 Hobby Boards & Projects 33 3D Printing 69 Retro Arcade/Gaming 92 All Other Tech 1.6K Store Information and Policy 78 Off Topic 15 Community Ideas & Feedback 120 Your Completed Builds 2.9K Build-Your-Own PC 1.9K Help Choosing Parts 251 Graphics Cards 200 CPUs, Memory, and Motherboards 73 Cases and Power Supplies 23 Air and Liquid Cooling 26 Monitors and Displays 34 Peripherals 19 All Other Parts 29 Featured Categories We love seeing what our customers build Submit photos and a description of your PC to our build showcase Submit Now Looking for a little inspiration? See other custom PC builds and get some ideas for what can be done View Build Showcase View builds by: AMD Processors Intel Processors RTX 3090 RTX 3080 RTX 2080 Ti RTX 2080 Super RTX 2070 Super RTX 2070 RTX 2060 Super Radeon RX 5700XT Radeon RX 5700 Air Cooled Liquid Cooled SAME DAY CUSTOM BUILD SERVICE If You Can Dream it, We Can Build it. Services starting at $149.99 More Details Micro Center Homepage Desktops Laptops Computer Parts Computer Accessories Custom PC Builder Build Showcase Networking Electronics 3D Printing Service, Upgrades & Repairs Laptop Battery Replacement Laptop Screen Repair Virus and Malware Removal Hard Drive Recovery and Backup Apple MacBook Repair Custom Built PCs Schedule an Appointment © Vanilla Foundation Theme 2022 Powered By Vanilla Community Article 3D Printer Troubleshooting Frequently Asked Questions - Micro Center Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker {$smarty.capture.menu} Activity Categories Discussions Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker 3D Printer Troubleshooting Frequently Asked Questions - Micro Center

Here are some of the most commonly received 3D printer / 3D printer troubleshooting-related questions and answers we receive at Micro Center:


Q – My 3D printer won’t turn on; how do I fix it?

A – Most 3D printers have an external power supply or power cable that always needs to be plugged in during operation. First check to make sure this is plugged in to both a working outlet and the printer. Also check that the power switch on the back of the printer is switched to the “On” position. If these do not resolve it, you may have a defective printer or cable.

                                                                       

Q – Why can’t I get anything to print?

A – Check the level of the print bed. If the nozzle is pressed too firm against the print bed, it may be blocking the filament. Re-level it so it’s slightly off the bed so filament can flow properly. Also make sure that you have filament left on your spool. If you don’t, you’ll need to replace it with a new spool. Feeding gears can also cause the filament to be trapped behind the hot end and will need to be fixed.

 

Q – Why is my nozzle clogged and how do I fix it?

A – Your nozzle may have bits of clumped filament or dirt inside which prevents filament from extruding. You can attempt a cold pull on the filament to clear the block, or you can also use a paperclip or cleaning kit to clear it.

 

Q – Why is the filament breaking and how do I prevent it?

A – Filament may dry rot over time in which case you’ll want to replace the filament altogether. The feed tube could be blocked, so make sure that there are no wires or objects in front of it to prevent breaking. The filament can also get tangled on the spool, and you’ll want to untangle it before inserting into the feed tube.

 

Q – Why is my filament burning?

A – Your nozzle may be too hot. You can attempt decreasing the temperature in increments of 10 degrees until it’s not burning anymore. The filament may be clogged in the nozzle in which you’ll need to clean it out.

 

Q – Why is filament is coming out of the sides of my hot end?

A – This can be caused by a gap being between the components of the hot end. This typically requires either reassembling the hot end and nozzle or tightening the pieces together when it’s at max temperature. This will ensure there are no additional gaps for the filament to exit through.


Q – How do I keep my printer from stopping midway through a print?

A – Make sure that you haven’t run out of filament and replace when needed. Check to make sure that the filament is not burning, as this will cause it to clog throughout a print. If it’s turning black/brown, make sure to lower the temperature so it doesn’t burn.

 

Q – Why isn’t my print sticking to the print bed?

A – Your print bed may not be level, so try releveling it. The bed could possibly be dirty, in which case it would need cleaned (even oil from your fingers can cause this). You can try using an additional adhesion on the bed such as a glue stick or heat resistant tape, like painters or decorator’s tape. You can also try adding a brim or raft to the original layer, and make sure that your first layer isn’t too thin.

 

Q – Why are my supports not printing properly?

A – Your supports may not print properly if they’re not sticking well enough to the bed, so try adding a brim or small platform beneath it. You can also add thickness to the supports themselves or even add supports yourself with the slicing tool to better support the model. If this fails, make sure your filament isn’t brittle or dried out.

 

Q – My first layers are coming out messy; how do I fix it?

A – This can be caused by the temperature of the nozzle or the printing bed being too hot. It could be an issue with the leveling of the bed, so try re-leveling it. Being too far away can cause it to print too thick and not stick, and it being too close can cause it to not adhere or not print enough filament.

 

Q – Why is my print flexing/bending on the print bed?

A – Make sure your temperature is correct for your type of filament. If it’s too high, it may cause the print to cool slower and shrink or warp while other layers are printed. Make sure the bed is level as this can cause it to warp later in the print. Also check that the nozzle is the correct distance from the bed, as it can cause it to be squished against the bed or be printed too thick.

 

Q – How do I keep the edges of my print from warping?

A – This can be caused by an unleveled print bed. You’ll want to make sure that the object you’re printing has plenty of contact with the bed for the first few layers so that it adheres enough to stick; a small area for initial layers raises the chance of warping. Make sure you’re using the correct filament, as most filaments other than PLA require a heated bed.

 

Q – My infill isn’t printing well, how do I fix this?

A – Infill for larger prints or that are directly below a horizontal surface may require a larger percent of infill. If it looks too thin, try decreasing the infill print speed as this can cause weak infill layers. Try using a different infill shape, as some work better than others (triangle, square, hexagons, etc.). Also make sure the nozzle is extruding at full capacity as a clog can cause it to under extrude.

 

Q – Why are there gaps between the print infill and walls/shell?

A – This may be caused by the temperature being too low, so try adjusting accordingly. You can also increase the infill overlap in your slicer software, but don’t go over 50% overlap. Try changing the printing priority to print the infill before the shell (most slicers default to shell before infill). Try lowering the print speed, as this will help avoid the nozzle missing small gaps.

 

Q – Why is my print infill visible on the outside of the print?

A – Try to increase the thickness of the outer shell in your slicer or modeling software. You can also try to lower the infill gap slightly in 5% increments at a time. Also remember to level the bed as this can cause misaligned infill.

 

Q – How can I prevent cracks/gaps between layers?

A – One way to prevent this is to adjust extruder temperatures; printing at too high of temperatures can cause them to cool too slowly and shrink later in the print, and lower temperatures can cause it to not be printed at the proper width/height. You can also reduce the fan speed, as cooling the print too quickly can cause layers to shrink, warp, or separate.

 

Q – How do I fix my layers not lining up properly?

A – Make sure that all belts are the proper tightness; being too loose or too tight can cause them to not make the proper movements during a print and cause layer jitter. Ensure that your pullies are moving around gears smoothly, and make sure to keep rods slightly lubricated for smooth belt rotation and not bent out of shape. Lastly, make sure that the platform that your printer rests on is stable.

 

Q – Why is my print missing layers and how do I fix it?

A – Make sure the rods are not bent and the pulleys are moving smoothly, oil rods when needed, and replace rods/belts if necessary. Locate bearings that are loose or worn down and replace when needed. Make sure there is no debris or blockage on these components.

 

Q – The details on my print aren’t printing properly; what causes this and how can I fix it?

A – To keep from losing small details you’ll want to decrease the layer height to get more resolution in your prints. Next you can try to decrease the printing speed as this will also increase print resolution. You can also use a nozzle with a smaller diameter if able. Finally, always make sure to keep the printer level, clean, and well lubricated, and always make sure your filament is not dried out.

 

Q – How do I fix my model when it’s stringy or drooping on the sides?

A – You can fix this by lowering your extrusion speeds to make sure it’s not over extruding compared to the speed. Also make sure that your extrusion multiplier is correct in your slicing software, as well as having the correct filament diameter checked in the software.

 

Q – How do I fix my model when it seems too thin or weak?

A – You can fix this by increasing your filament flow to make sure an even layer is being extruded. Also, make sure that your filament diameter is correctly set in your slicer software. Lastly, always make sure to clear the nozzle of debris.

 

Q – Why does my model have stringy filament on it and how do I fix it?

A – Stringing is normally caused by a lack of retraction, so make sure this is enabled in your slicing software. You can also reduce the minimum travel distance on your print in increments of .5mm until it eventually is fixed. You can always just trim these strings off as well, as they normally are incredibly thin and fragile and can be removed easily.

 

Q – My print is losing size when printed; how do I fix this?

A – Always make sure to check your slicing software for things such as the dimensions compared to your pre-slicer model, the slicer scaling, and the poly count. All of these can cause your model to be the incorrect dimensions once printed. You can also try printing a test cube to compare with the model, as this will tell you whether it’s the model or the slicer. Lastly, always make sure the nozzle is clean and clear of debris.

 

Q – What should I do if I can’t get my print to come off my printing bed?

A – Using a scraper or palette knife is always the easiest way to remove most prints, just make sure to wait until it’s cooled enough. If your bed is heated, you can also remove it and insert it into an oven at around 100 degrees Fahrenheit but do this cautiously. You can also try adding small holes in the bottom of the print (if you can edit it) to lower the amount of area sticking to the bed.

 

Q – How do I send a model from my slicer to my printer?

A – This depends on what your printer offers. If it has wireless capabilities, you can print wirelessly from your slicing software if it’s connected to your network. If it’s not wireless, you’d need to hard wire it to your computer, or you can use a storage device such as a flash drive to download the file from the slicer to the printer.

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Community Article Print Your Own Personal Protective Equipment! — Micro Center Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker {$smarty.capture.menu} Activity Categories Discussions Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker Home › How to & Technical Guides › 3D Printers Print Your Own Personal Protective Equipment! ryau ✭✭✭✭✭ May 2020 edited April 5 in 3D Printers By Andy Leer, Merchandise Manager @ Micro Center. With all of the recent events in the world, PPE (Personal Protective Equipment) has become more and more essential to our everyday lives. Obtaining PPE can be quite difficult for the average person and even extremely difficult for our essential workers. Makers have recently turned their making skills to help with the production of PPE at home. Utilizing 3D printers, makers and DIYers have been 3D printing face shields and masks for hospitals, as well as creating other useful items such as ear savers and pocket sized tools that assist in contactless interactions with items such as doors, locks and buttons. We are seeing many people using this as an opportunity to jump into 3D printing or expand their existing printer farm. It is important to understand that there are a few types of 3D printing so that you make the right choice if you are looking to get into 3D printing. The most common type uses Fused Filament Fabrication of FFF for short. This form essentially acts as a smart glue gun that builds items up layer by layer using a material called filament. Growing in popularity, another form of 3D printing is  SLA or LCD Resin printing. These lower cost SLA printers use an LCD screen vs a laser to cure liquid resin. This type of printing can produce very fine results, but is often not a good use for larger functional pieces such as masks and shields.   The 3D Printer The Creality 3D printers have continually impressed us here at Micro Center and the popularity of the Ender 3 Pro has been outstanding. This printer, because of its straightforward nature, allows the user to easily modify and improve with simple prints. If you need a bed larger than the 220mm x 220mm x 230mm you can check out the larger CR-10s. The CR-10s boasts a 300mm x 300 mm x 400mm build volume which will allow you to produce more in the same run than it’s slightly smaller predecessor. Overall, the benefit to Creality printers is their community. There are so many forums, upgrades, and YouTube videos that you will be able to find any information you need should you run into an issue. The Filament Polyethylene Terephthalate Glycol-modified or PETG for short has become increasing popular during the pandemic as it has a higher melting temperature which is suggested to be able to withstand a sterilization within a medical autoclave. For a more common and great starter material a lot of people turn to Poly-Lactic Acid, or PLA. This has been a popular material for a while now and is probably the most commonly printed with. This material, while having a lower melting point, would be best utilized for items around the house and not necessarily major mechanical parts. Printing shields and face masks with PLA is possible just as it is with PETG. Your results may vary based on the quality of the print and material.   Face Masks Don’t forget, if you don’t have a 3D printer, there are a number of other resources out there for making quick cloth masks as well! If you are using a 3D printer, here is an example of a design that we came across. Skill Level: Medium URL: https://copper3d.com/hackthepandemic/ Amount of Filament: 6.45m / ~ 51g Time Required: Roughly 5 Hours @ .2mm layer height Other Materials Needed: Elastic or other Strap material, and filter material, please see site for recommended materials. Tips/Advice: Its worth noting that 3D printed masks aren’t perfect and your mileage may very. Comfort may also be a consideration.   Face Shields Shields have by far been the most printed PPE during this epidemic. Makers and maker communitys and individuals from all around have stepped up to print this protective gear. Shields are typically composed of 3 parts. A 3d printed band to go around the forehead, a pieces of transparent plastic, often PETG, and a strap to go around the back of the head. Sometimes a secondary piece of plastic is made to go on the bottom of the transparent piece to help retain its shape. It can be difficult to obtain some of the secondary pieces so people have utilized overhead transparency sheets as well as rubber bands to make up the remaining 2 pieces. Small hooks have also been designed to clip onto a ball cap and then hold the transparent plastic in place.   Skill Level: Easy URL: https://www.prusaprinters.org/prints/28504-slim-rc3-us-with-comfort-features-plus-shield/files Amount of Filament: 10.18m / ~ 30g Time Required: Roughly 3 hours at .2mm layer height Other Materials Needed: Transparent Plastic Sheet, Elastic or Large Rubber band for strap Tips/Advice: Make sure to check with local groups to see what preferred model they are accepting as some groups have an approved model for their use case. Resources: Some additional items you may want to check out include: These would all be considered easier prints and use less filament per piece than the two above. Ear Savers: https://3dprint.nih.gov/discover/ear-saver CoVid Door/Button Tools: https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:4255283 Cloth Mask Strap Clips: https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:4294763 You may also want to sign up with Masksfordocs who can pair you up with local healthcare groups to make sure the right equipment goes to the right people. If you've 3D printed and/or donated any PPE, please share your donations and info about your printer and model files used.  2 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Comments cyberhiker ✭ May 2020 The NIH 3D Printing Exchange is a good source of models that have been evaluated and approved for use by medical professionals and the general public.  Check with the group you are donating to for their preferred models. 2 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook AlexPasseno Columbus OH Store Associate March 2021 was fun factory lining these for months on end! 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Categories 8K All Categories 1.2K The Blog 63 What's Trending 15 Past News and Updates 185 How to & Technical Guides 13 Computer Hardware 119 Software 3 Home Office 6 Networking 2 Audio/Visual 2 Home Automation 20 3D Printers 20 Maker 32 PC Build Guides 120 Reviews & Buying Guides 55 Build Showcase 27 Contests 48 Past Contests 1.6K The Community 1.9K General Discussion 105 New Members 248 Consumer Tech 68 Prebuilt PCs and Laptops 100 Software 8 Audio/Visual 27 Networking & Security 1 Home Automation 3 Digital Photography 3 Content Creators 22 Hobby Boards & Projects 33 3D Printing 69 Retro Arcade/Gaming 92 All Other Tech 1.6K Store Information and Policy 78 Off Topic 17 Community Ideas & Feedback 120 Your Completed Builds 2.9K Build-Your-Own PC 1.9K Help Choosing Parts 251 Graphics Cards 200 CPUs, Memory, and Motherboards 73 Cases and Power Supplies 23 Air and Liquid Cooling 26 Monitors and Displays 34 Peripherals 19 All Other Parts 29 Featured Categories We love seeing what our customers build Submit photos and a description of your PC to our build showcase Submit Now Looking for a little inspiration? See other custom PC builds and get some ideas for what can be done View Build Showcase View builds by: AMD Processors Intel Processors RTX 3090 RTX 3080 RTX 2080 Ti RTX 2080 Super RTX 2070 Super RTX 2070 RTX 2060 Super Radeon RX 5700XT Radeon RX 5700 Air Cooled Liquid Cooled SAME DAY CUSTOM BUILD SERVICE If You Can Dream it, We Can Build it. Services starting at $149.99 More Details Micro Center Homepage Desktops Laptops Computer Parts Computer Accessories Custom PC Builder Build Showcase Networking Electronics 3D Printing Service, Upgrades & Repairs Laptop Battery Replacement Laptop Screen Repair Virus and Malware Removal Hard Drive Recovery and Backup Apple MacBook Repair Custom Built PCs Schedule an Appointment © Vanilla Foundation Theme 2022 Powered By Vanilla Community Article HOW TO diagnose underextrusion — Micro Center Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker {$smarty.capture.menu} Activity Categories Discussions Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker Home › How to & Technical Guides › 3D Printers HOW TO diagnose underextrusion AlexPasseno Columbus OH Store Associate June 2021 in 3D Printers when dealing with underextrusion there are a few things you have to ask yourself, "did i make any large changes to how my filament feeds into the hotend recently?" "how long has this filament been sitting out?" "am i printing with composite filaments?" "Does the extruder arm feel tight enough?" or "have i recently swapped from a high temp material to a low temp material?" If you made a large change to your extruder setup (IE. swapped to a direct drive from a bowden style or vise versa) you will probably need to do an estep calibration All filament has a shelf life to it that is highly dependent on ambient moisture my general rule of thumb is about 2-3 months out in open air for pla, but you can check to see if the pla has gone bad early, if you bend an inch or two of filament at the end of the reel and it bends, then its still good, if it snaps the filaments probably gone bad. if you are printing with composite materials (carbon fiber, wood, glitter) then there is a good chance you have a partial clog, the easy fix is to replace the nozzle and call it a day but the right fix is to take a small acupuncture needle and stick it through the tip while the nozzle is heated (be careful! that nozzle WILL be under pressure and releasing that clog sometimes causes it to shoot out) the extruder arm is the lever you have to push down right where you feed your filament in, this arm is typically made of an injection molded plastic which will eventually just shatter! upgrading to a metal extruder will usually fix this issue (sku 135723 for most printers) best practice from swapping from a high temp material to a low temp material is to run a bit of purge filament through, however in a pinch you can heat your nozzle to ~10 degrees higher than the material you were just printing with it and shove some of the lower temp material through untill it runs through clean (do note DO NOT EXCEED 260 DEGREES AND PUSH PLA THROUGH this will carbonize your pla and that is a pain to clean up and will require purge/cleaning filament to fix) 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Categories 8K All Categories 1.2K The Blog 63 What's Trending 15 Past News and Updates 185 How to & Technical Guides 13 Computer Hardware 119 Software 3 Home Office 6 Networking 2 Audio/Visual 2 Home Automation 20 3D Printers 20 Maker 32 PC Build Guides 120 Reviews & Buying Guides 55 Build Showcase 27 Contests 48 Past Contests 1.6K The Community 1.9K General Discussion 105 New Members 248 Consumer Tech 68 Prebuilt PCs and Laptops 100 Software 8 Audio/Visual 27 Networking & Security 1 Home Automation 3 Digital Photography 3 Content Creators 22 Hobby Boards & Projects 33 3D Printing 69 Retro Arcade/Gaming 92 All Other Tech 1.6K Store Information and Policy 78 Off Topic 17 Community Ideas & Feedback 120 Your Completed Builds 2.9K Build-Your-Own PC 1.9K Help Choosing Parts 251 Graphics Cards 200 CPUs, Memory, and Motherboards 73 Cases and Power Supplies 23 Air and Liquid Cooling 26 Monitors and Displays 34 Peripherals 19 All Other Parts 29 Featured Categories We love seeing what our customers build Submit photos and a description of your PC to our build showcase Submit Now Looking for a little inspiration? See other custom PC builds and get some ideas for what can be done View Build Showcase View builds by: AMD Processors Intel Processors RTX 3090 RTX 3080 RTX 2080 Ti RTX 2080 Super RTX 2070 Super RTX 2070 RTX 2060 Super Radeon RX 5700XT Radeon RX 5700 Air Cooled Liquid Cooled SAME DAY CUSTOM BUILD SERVICE If You Can Dream it, We Can Build it. Services starting at $149.99 More Details Micro Center Homepage Desktops Laptops Computer Parts Computer Accessories Custom PC Builder Build Showcase Networking Electronics 3D Printing Service, Upgrades & Repairs Laptop Battery Replacement Laptop Screen Repair Virus and Malware Removal Hard Drive Recovery and Backup Apple MacBook Repair Custom Built PCs Schedule an Appointment © Vanilla Foundation Theme 2022 Powered By Vanilla Community Article Ender 3 Pro 3D Printer Frequently Asked Questions - Micro Center Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker {$smarty.capture.menu} Activity Categories Discussions Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker Ender 3 Pro 3D Printer Frequently Asked Questions - Micro Center

This article contains some of the most frequently asked questions about Creality Ender 3 Pro 3D Printer that we have received at Micro Center. This article aims to answer common setup and assembly related questions.


Q: Do I have to assemble the Ender 3 Pro?

A: The Ender 3 Pro comes partially assembled. However, there will be some parts that need to be put together. All assembly is extensively documented and included with the product.


Q: Can I use an SD card to print with this printer?

A: Yes, you can use an SD card to print files from.


Q: How do I print from an SD card?

A: To print from an SD card, insert the SD card into the SD card slot at the front left of the printer. Choose Print from SD on the on-screen menu and then select the file you wish to print.


Q: Can I print over my network?

A: Officially the Ender 3 Pro does not support network printing. You can however use third-party software such as OctoPrint to enable wireless printing using a Raspberry Pi. You can find instructions for OctoPrint on the manufacturer's website. However, keep in mind this is not supported by the manufacturers of the printer. As such, Micro Center Tech Support is limited in troubleshooting anything concerning wireless printing if you run into issues with this.


Q: Can I print with a USB cable?

A: You can print via USB with a USB A cable to a USB Mini B cable. This cable is not included with the printer as printing via the SD card is the recommended method. However, you can pick up one of these cables at your local Micro Center.


Q: Can I print with TPE / TPU or other flexible filaments?

A: As this printer has a Bowden style extruder, it is not recommended to print with flexible filaments. Due to its design, it will typically end in a failed print and serious clogging of the extruder.


Q: Does this printer automatically level the bed?

A: There is no automation in the bed leveling. It must be done manually. To level the bed, select Prepare, then Auto Home. After the printer finishes homing, choose Prepare, then Disable Steppers. This will allow you to move the extruder assembly so that you can properly level the bed.


Q: How do I level the bed after disabling the steppers?

A: Move the extruder to the four corners of the bed one at a time. Push the extruder assembly as low as it will go towards the bed. You should be able to place a piece of printing paper in-between the nozzle and the bed with the nozzle lightly scratching the paper. Adjust the knobs underneath the bed as needed. There will be 4, one in each corner.


Q: How do I load my filament?

A: You can load your filament by selecting Prepare on the on-screen menu, then Preheat PLA, or Preheat ABS depending on which filament you are using. Next press and hold down the extruder level and insert your 1.75mm filament through the hole of the extruder. Continue feeding until you see filament come out of the nozzle.


Q: I’m not using PLA or ABS, how do I load filament?

A: If you need to select a different temperature to preheat the printer to, select Control on the on-screen menu, then Temperature, then Nozzle, and change this to the desired value. From there you will load the filament as normal.


Q: How do I unload filament?

A: Heat up the nozzle to the melting point of the filament you are using, press down the lever on the extruder, and pull the filament out quickly, ensuring you don’t let it cool down in the extruder and clog it.


Q: I am using Cura, but I don’t see an option for the Ender 3 Pro, which printer do I select?

A: You will need to select Creality CR-10. Change the Printer Name to Ender-3 Pro, and change the X and Y values to 220, and the Z value to 250.


Q: What comes with the Ender 3 Pro?

A: The Ender Pro 3 comes with pliers, an extra nozzle, an 8GB SD card, pneumatic fittings for your filament loading tube, cable ties, a blade to remove models from the bed, various Allen keys for construction and maintenance, a needle to remove difficult clogs from the nozzle, a wrench, screwdriver, rack for the filament spool, and a PTFE tube for guiding the filament into the hot end.


Q: What is the magnetic bed that is advertised for this printer?

A: The magnetic bed makes it much easier to remove prints. You can simply lift the bed off to remove your models. This makes it much easier to remove your prints and can make the bed last longer as you do not have to scrape off the models with the included blade.


Q: Where can I purchase replacement magnetic beds for this printer?

A: You can purchase replacement beds directly from Creality.


Q: What Power Supply Unit (PSU) is included with this printer? Is it reliable?

A: The power supply used with this printer is a Mean Well LRS-350-24. You can find exact specifications on this PSU on the manufacturer's website. It is advertised to fully preheat the printer within five minutes.


Q: Can the Ender 3 Pro resume printing after powering it off?

A: The Ender 3 Pro can resume printing after a loss of power. Whether your power goes out, or you simply need to pause and resume later, the Ender 3 Pro will remember the exact coordinates it was printing at last and will resume when power returns.


Q: What upgrades are available for the Ender 3 Pro?

A: There are quite a few upgrades you can purchase or simply print for the Ender 3 and Ender 3 Pro. Creality has put together a list of those on their website, and unless otherwise specified they will work for both the Ender 3 and Ender 3 Pro.


Q: I want to upgrade to a glass bed. Is this possible?

A: You can upgrade to a glass bed for the Ender 3 Pro directly from the manufacturer: https://www.creality3dofficial.com/products/creality-new-upgraded-heated-bed-build-plate-surface


Q: Can I download the source code, documentation, and software for the Ender 3 Pro?

A: The source code is available from the manufacturer's website at: https://www.creality.com/goods-detail/ender-3-pro-3d-printer


Q: What is the URL for the manufacturer's website?

A: As of the writing of this document, the manufacturer's website can be found at: https://creality.com/

© Vanilla Foundation Theme 2022 Powered By Vanilla Community Article Inland Filaments — Micro Center Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker {$smarty.capture.menu} Activity Categories Discussions Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker Home › General Discussion Inland Filaments Martinnn ✭ November 2021 edited November 2021 in General Discussion Is there any idea when they re-stock in store? The houston tx store has not re-stocked inland filaments in a long time. The website does not match the inventory they have in the store. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Answers TSKevinG admin November 2021 Good Morning @Martinnn Thank you for contacting micro center. At this time we do not have a specific time frame we expect the filament back in stock in stock. If you are looking for a specific filament to get, i would bookmark the page to keep an eye on it. one it is back in stock it will appear on the website. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Categories 8K All Categories 1.2K The Blog 63 What's Trending 15 Past News and Updates 185 How to & Technical Guides 13 Computer Hardware 119 Software 3 Home Office 6 Networking 2 Audio/Visual 2 Home Automation 20 3D Printers 20 Maker 32 PC Build Guides 120 Reviews & Buying Guides 55 Build Showcase 27 Contests 48 Past Contests 1.6K The Community 1.9K General Discussion 105 New Members 248 Consumer Tech 68 Prebuilt PCs and Laptops 100 Software 8 Audio/Visual 27 Networking & Security 1 Home Automation 3 Digital Photography 3 Content Creators 22 Hobby Boards & Projects 33 3D Printing 69 Retro Arcade/Gaming 92 All Other Tech 1.6K Store Information and Policy 78 Off Topic 16 Community Ideas & Feedback 120 Your Completed Builds 2.9K Build-Your-Own PC 1.9K Help Choosing Parts 251 Graphics Cards 200 CPUs, Memory, and Motherboards 73 Cases and Power Supplies 23 Air and Liquid Cooling 26 Monitors and Displays 34 Peripherals 19 All Other Parts 29 Featured Categories We love seeing what our customers build Submit photos and a description of your PC to our build showcase Submit Now Looking for a little inspiration? See other custom PC builds and get some ideas for what can be done View Build Showcase View builds by: AMD Processors Intel Processors RTX 3090 RTX 3080 RTX 2080 Ti RTX 2080 Super RTX 2070 Super RTX 2070 RTX 2060 Super Radeon RX 5700XT Radeon RX 5700 Air Cooled Liquid Cooled SAME DAY CUSTOM BUILD SERVICE If You Can Dream it, We Can Build it. Services starting at $149.99 More Details Micro Center Homepage Desktops Laptops Computer Parts Computer Accessories Custom PC Builder Build Showcase Networking Electronics 3D Printing Service, Upgrades & Repairs Laptop Battery Replacement Laptop Screen Repair Virus and Malware Removal Hard Drive Recovery and Backup Apple MacBook Repair Custom Built PCs Schedule an Appointment © Vanilla Foundation Theme 2022 Powered By Vanilla Community Article How to unclog a 3D printer - Micro Center Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker {$smarty.capture.menu} Activity Categories Discussions Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker How to unclog a 3D printer - Micro Center

After using a 3D printer, you will inevitably eventually come across the filament clogging in the extruder. This can ruin prints, however, luckily is easy to fix. If you have a 1.25mm J-hook this will work best, alternatively you can use a straightened paper clip.


1.  Ensure the 3D printer is off and unplugged before beginning this process. Make sure to have the paperclip at the ready.


2.  Depending on the printer, remove the feeder first. This is done on most printers by unscrewing the two screws on the front of the fans, pulling off the fan guard, fan, heat sink, and spacers. For PowerSpec printers there is a small spacer in the screw hole on the fans, as well as a larger spacer between the heatsink and fan. Keep in mind which side which fan is on, as this is important to place back on correctly.


3.  Once the feeder is removed, access is granted to the extruders. They are mounted on a small metal bar, however the extruders do not need to be removed from that.


4.  If there is filament stuck directly into the extruders, the extruders need to heat up in order to remove the filament. Please keep in mind the extruders themselves will be very hot and it is important to keep fingers and other components away from them. The fans will automatically turn on once the extruders reach a certain temperature.

5.  Allow the extruders to heat for roughly 5-10 minutes, depending on how badly they are clogged.


6.  Take the j-hook and insert it into the extruder to push the filament out.

7.  Continue pushing the filament out until little or no filament sticks to the j-hook after pulling it out.

8.  Shut the printer off and let it cool before assembling it back.

9.  Once the printer is reassembled, load more filament and continue printing.

 

 

© Vanilla Foundation Theme 2022 Powered By Vanilla Community Article How to Choose a 3D Printer — Micro Center Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker {$smarty.capture.menu} Activity Categories Discussions Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker Home › How to & Technical Guides › 3D Printers How to Choose a 3D Printer MicroCenterOfficial admin April 2021 edited April 5 in 3D Printers By Ben Price 3D printers have only grown in popularity in the past few years, and are becoming a more and more common feature in tech households. But, even as they become a household idea, there are still many questions that people continue to ask about 3D printers, including which model they should purchase, what is needed to properly 3D print, and how much money should be set aside in order to print. So today, we’re going to shed some light on 3D printers and go over which 3D printers are the best fit for your needs.   What are 3D Printers? 3D printing is the process of making three-dimensional solid objects from a digital file. Just like how traditional printers take digital text files and print them onto a piece of paper, 3D printers take files of 3D models and print them out as 3D objects. The creation of a 3D printed object is done by means of what is called an additive process, or laying down successive layers of material until the object is created. Each of these layers can be seen as a thinly sliced cross-section of the object.   Different Types of 3D Printers While there are many different types of 3D printers, only a few are commonly used by everyday consumers. We’ll take a look at the most common ones so you can understand the difference between each type of printer, and which one is the best fit for you. FDM filament printers: The most popular 3D printers on the market are those that use FDM (fused deposition modeling) technology. FDM printers gained much of their popularity thanks to lower costs and ease of accessibility, and have the simplest functionality. They operate using thermoplastic filament, melting down the plastic and printing it through a metal nozzle onto a printing bed layer by layer. These printers also generally use non-toxic filament and typically have open printing beds. Because of their simplicity in how they function and affordable price, this is probably the best option for private users who are new to 3D printing.   SLA resin printers: Resin printers use SLA (or Stereolithography) technology, which is the oldest of all 3D printing technologies. Even though they were the first 3D printers created, they still remain one of the best to this day. Unlike FDM filament printers, SLA resin printers use a photopolymer resin tank and a UV laser beam; the laser forms the part, which grows on the printer’s platform. Resin printers are arguably better than other 3D printers thanks to their ability to print highly detailed objects, making them perfect for creating prototypes, figurines, or complex and small parts. The downside of resin printers is that they give off a very strong smell and everything printed with them must be washed and cured.   DLP resin printers: Another resin printer, DLP stands for Digital Light Processing, which works slightly differently than SLA tech. DLP printers use all of the same materials as regular SLA printers, but also feature an ultraviolet light source projector, and have a more streamlined process of curing resin. DLP resin printers are also cheaper than SLA printers, making them a better choice for private users.   SLS printers: SLS (Selective Laser Sintering) printers again work very similarly to SLA printers, with a printer laser instead used to sinter materials together, instead of melting them. SLS printers also use polymer powder instead of traditional filament. These printers are most commonly used to create industrial products for places such as laboratories, research centers, teaching centers, and more. These printers are generally only used by larger companies, with very few models available for private users.   What Do You Need To Use a 3D Printer? Printer Filament: On the basest level, to use a 3D printer all that is needed is a power source for the unit, and printer filament. Filaments used in 3D printing are thermoplastics, which are plastic materials that can be shaped and molded, and solidify when cooled. Unlike other plastics, they melt instead of burn when heated. There are dozens of different types of filaments, and the type that you will need depends on the 3D printer that you have. Be sure to figure out which type of filament is compatible with your 3D printer before making your purchase -- filaments can also range in price quite a bit, and different types of filaments can be used to make different sorts of objects. If you're looking for more information about 3D printer filament, be sure to check out our Filament Guide!   Download or Create 3D Models: Actually printing, however, requires something to print. You will need to either acquire 3D models online or make them yourself. 3D models are created using 3D modeling software, which is commonly referred to as CAD (computer-aided design) software. Blender, ZBrush, and Autodesk Fusion 360 are some of the more popular 3D modeling software out there. Any of them will do if you're looking to design your own print designs. However, if you're new to the 3D printing space and worried about designing your own models, you're in luck. There are multiple sites with a wide variety of already-created 3D models ready for downloading and printing. Thingiverse, MyMiniFactory, Cults3D, and CGTrader are some of the most popular sites that you should check out.   Slicing Software: After you have your 3D model downloaded, you’ll then need to prepare it for printing in another software, which will translate the model into machine instructions. This is known as slicing software, also known as slicers. Once your 3D model is loaded into a slicer, it will virtually “slice” the model into individual layers. The result is a new file that consists of G-code, which is the language of 3D printers. These files contain important information, including the correct printing speed and temperature, layer height, thickness, and much more.   The Best 3D Printer for You So now that you know a bit more about 3D printers, it’s time to ask the question: what 3D printer is best for you? Well, that entirely depends on your budget, and what you’re trying to achieve with a 3D printer. Here are some of the best 3D printers currently on the market, sorted from lower-end to high-end units.   Best Budget 3D Printer - Creality LD-002R ($199) Creality LD-002R The Simple Creality LD-002R is one of the most affordable 3D printers out there, costing just under $200. There’s a lot to love about this resin printer, from its compact form factor to its easy-to-operate simplicity and incredibly consistent prints.  The only real downsides to this printer are its touchscreen interface, which has reportedly been a bit unresponsive at times, as well as the product’s manual, which really doesn’t help the user out a whole lot. Thankfully, the 3D printing community is incredibly helpful and has plenty of resources online to help get you printing. Even with these two small caveats, the Simple Creality LD-002R is fantastic and is strongly recommended for anybody looking to get into 3D printing on a budget.   Best Mid-Range 3D Printer - Creality Ender 6 ($569) Creality Ender-6 The Creality Ender 6 is a fantastic mid-range option for 3D printing enthusiasts. Featuring a large open bed with walls covering all sides of it and a door for access to the inside, this 3D printer is one of the most secure of all open-bedded printers. This printer has absolutely fantastic build quality and feels incredibly sturdy, and results in some amazing 3D prints. It’s noteworthy just how large this 3D printer is as well, allowing for prints that go beyond the small-scale options other printers may limit you to. At just $569, the Creality Ender 6 is a great deal, and perfect for those looking to print large objects with FDM filament. Best Luxury 3D Printer - Snapmaker 2.0 Modular 3-in-1 ($1,799) Snapmaker 2.0 Modular 3-in-1 The Snapmaker 2.0 is an incredible 3D printer, acting also as a laser cutter and CNC machine in a 3-in-1 package. Judging it solely as a 3D printer, this machine has excellent print quality, has great and easy-to-understand software, and is overall designed excellently. The printer is made entirely out of machined metal, with the build quality greater than most competing models. The printer is also very easy to assemble, with the instructions being incredibly straightforward and simple. Perhaps the only real downside of this printer is its noise levels: at times, it can be quite loud.  Though this printer is quite expensive, its incredibly high level of quality makes it worth it -- and the fact that you are getting a laser cutter and CNC machine in this package as well makes it feel even more worthwhile. Simply put, if you can afford this printer and will use all of its features, then it’s more than worth the purchase.   Our Recommendation - Lulzbot Mini 2 ($1,499) Lulzbot Mini 2 The Lulzbot Mini 2 is our go-to 3D printer recommendation for many reasons: it’s incredibly reliable and easy to use, has top-notch printing quality, and is very user-friendly. It has a very simple and straightforward design, making it easy to use for even those new to the world of 3D printing. The Lulzbot Mini 2 improves on the Lulzbot Mini 1, with faster motors, a slightly larger print bed, and an improved printhead that can handle more flexible materials. The printer also prints fast and quietly on a compact print bed, all of which are solid plusses.   If you’re looking for a 3D printer that offers you great quality printing with lots of options for filament with a quiet and fast print, then the Lulzbot Mini 2 is one of the best options you can find. But with that said, it comes at a cost: $1,499 is a steep price, and only those looking for the added benefits of paying more should invest in this. But at the end of the day, it’s hard to get a better 3D printer that delivers as well as this one.   And there you have it -- four of some of the best 3D printers currently on the market, for every type of budget. Whether you’ve got a huge budget or only have a few hundred dollars available to spend, you should have no trouble with affording a 3D printer! In 2021, owning a 3D printer is more affordable and realistic than ever and we’re sure you’ll find something to scratch that 3D printing itch. 1 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Categories 8K All Categories 1.2K The Blog 63 What's Trending 15 Past News and Updates 185 How to & Technical Guides 13 Computer Hardware 119 Software 3 Home Office 6 Networking 2 Audio/Visual 2 Home Automation 20 3D Printers 20 Maker 32 PC Build Guides 120 Reviews & Buying Guides 55 Build Showcase 27 Contests 48 Past Contests 1.6K The Community 1.9K General Discussion 105 New Members 248 Consumer Tech 68 Prebuilt PCs and Laptops 100 Software 8 Audio/Visual 27 Networking & Security 1 Home Automation 3 Digital Photography 3 Content Creators 22 Hobby Boards & Projects 33 3D Printing 69 Retro Arcade/Gaming 92 All Other Tech 1.6K Store Information and Policy 78 Off Topic 17 Community Ideas & Feedback 120 Your Completed Builds 2.9K Build-Your-Own PC 1.9K Help Choosing Parts 251 Graphics Cards 200 CPUs, Memory, and Motherboards 73 Cases and Power Supplies 23 Air and Liquid Cooling 26 Monitors and Displays 34 Peripherals 19 All Other Parts 29 Featured Categories We love seeing what our customers build Submit photos and a description of your PC to our build showcase Submit Now Looking for a little inspiration? See other custom PC builds and get some ideas for what can be done View Build Showcase View builds by: AMD Processors Intel Processors RTX 3090 RTX 3080 RTX 2080 Ti RTX 2080 Super RTX 2070 Super RTX 2070 RTX 2060 Super Radeon RX 5700XT Radeon RX 5700 Air Cooled Liquid Cooled SAME DAY CUSTOM BUILD SERVICE If You Can Dream it, We Can Build it. Services starting at $149.99 More Details Micro Center Homepage Desktops Laptops Computer Parts Computer Accessories Custom PC Builder Build Showcase Networking Electronics 3D Printing Service, Upgrades & Repairs Laptop Battery Replacement Laptop Screen Repair Virus and Malware Removal Hard Drive Recovery and Backup Apple MacBook Repair Custom Built PCs Schedule an Appointment © Vanilla Foundation Theme 2022 Powered By Vanilla Community Article Getting Started with 3D Printing — Micro Center Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker {$smarty.capture.menu} Activity Categories Discussions Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker Home › How to & Technical Guides › 3D Printers Getting Started with 3D Printing Cfresh Columbus, Ohio admin September 2021 edited November 2021 in 3D Printers Just purchased a 3D printer? Looking into getting a 3D printer? Then, this is the place to be. 3D printers can be daunting, but the idea of 3D printing and all you can do with 3D printers is fascinating. Being able to make whatever you want from a computer? It sounds fun but how it works is a bit more complicated than that. That's why we are here with this guide to help you get your 3D printing started, and soon you'll be making prints like no other! Choosing a 3D Printer When choosing your 3D printer, you need to be mindful of many things, your experience, price range, and materials you'll be printing with. For a complete guide on picking the right 3D printer, please check out our How to Choose a 3D Printer guide! What else do I need? - Slicing Software -Micro SD Card and Reader -PLA Filament -3D Models to Print How do I get my printer to print? Now that you have your printer and your filament, how do you start printing? For your 3D printer to print something, it needs a file to read to understand how it should print. This is where Gcode files come in. Gcode files are, essentially, instructions for the printer on how to print something. You get one of these files by taking a 3D model file and uploading it to slicing software to be converted from a 3D Model Files (.stl) to a gcode file. A great place to look for 3D Model files is Thingiverse.com. Thingiverse is a site created by MakerBot, a top-rated 3D printer company. You can also check out Yeggi or Cults. These sites have many designs uploaded from other creators, and you can download their creations and upload them to the slicing software! But first, you need to understand how slicing software works. Using a Slicing Software Slicing software is essential for the 3D printer to be able to print anything. Slicing software takes a 3D Model created by yourself or someone else and then converts it into a file that works essentially as an instruction for the 3D printer to print the object. This software also allows you to change the settings for your printer, like changing speed, temperatures, and even foundation settings, with much more able to be changed. This part of 3D printing can get complicated and will take a lot of trial and error to find the proper settings for your prints based on their size, shape, and printer! A lot of research will need to be done based on your filament type, printer bed material, how level or flat your printer is, and sometimes even the climate of your room. Ultimaker Cura is a fantastic slicing software, both easy to use and free! There is other software for more advanced users like Simplify3D, a paid option but with more features. Once you upload your .stl file to this software and are done with your settings, you can upload the print to a Micro-SD card which you will then insert into your printer. Understanding the 3D printer Menus The menus on a 3D printer can be confusing and are different on most 3D printers. We'll go through a few of the more common settings, but they will vary from printer to printer. Auto-homing is when you set your 3D printer to go to the zero points of all axis'. This is where your printer will start before commencing a print, and this option is critical when trying to level. Preheat PLA is, as the name implies, for when you have PLA loaded into the printer and need it to be heated to start the print instantly. You can also change the default temperature for preheating in settings too. This is important when removing the filament from the printer as it will become stuck without preheating the nozzle. Another option is to Disable Steppers. This is important when trying to level as well. Disabling steppers allow you to move the nozzle around the bed without any resistance freely. Additionally, you can also view your SD card and select files on it to print. On the photo to the left, you can see where it says "No TF Card." When a card is inserted, it will show the SD card there, and you can select it to see the GCode files on the card and print them. (Pictured is the settings menu from an Ender 3) Leveling Your Printer Having a level printer bed is one of the most important things you need to know to get good quality prints. There are a couple of ways to do this. One would be the easy way: getting and installing an auto best leveling sensor that will automatically level your printer bed for you. However, leveling is not super complex and can quickly be done without buying anything extra. In the photo to the right, you can see a gear under the bed of the printer. These are called thumb wheels and are used to tighten the bed. There are four of these located in each corner of the bed. You can level the bed by tightening these to lower the bed and loosening them to raise the bed. If you go into your printer settings and auto home the printer and disable steppers, you should be able to move your nozzle freely along the bed. Be sure to not raise the nozzle from the home position so you can accurately level the bed. You will want to be able to fit a piece of paper between the nozzle and the bed. You don't want your nozzle to drag against the bed, but you also want the nozzle to be sliding against the paper. It is a thin line to make sure it is level. Thankfully, there are tests you can run to make sure the bed is level, such as this one on Thingiverse. The lines should print onto the bed and be well defined but do not come off by gently running your finger over it. If both are the case, then you have a leveled printer bed! Leveling Troubleshooting Are you trying to level but still having issues? You may need to look at some other aspects. For one, make sure the foundation of the printer is secure. Make all bolts are tightened securely. Go through and check every single one, especially the ones on the main foundation. If you don't have secure bolts, then the level can be lost earlier from the movement of the printer, and prints can be ruined halfway through. Also, check your limit switch (Pictured Left). This switch is responsible for setting the Zero Point of the printer. ADjusting this will allow you to move your print nozzle to the correct position for printing. Is PLA not adhering to the print bed? Sometimes the PLA still will not stick to your print bed even if the bed is level. Difficulty adhering to the print bed can be common if you have a different material bed like a glass bed, but it can happen to any bed type. This can be fixed by spraying hairspray to the bed or using a glue stick. It's also common to buy and apply painter's tape, which you can find here. Loading Filament into your Printer Eventually, you will need to load and unload the filament. This is important for printing with different kinds of materials and colors. Generally, in 3D printers, the filament will run through something called the Bowden tube into the extruder. Sometimes, it can be challenging to get the filament into the tube. An excellent and easy workaround is to cut the filament at a diagonal. This allows it to remain straight and go into the Bowden tube quickly. The filament must be running off the spool without any tangling happening. If the filament has parts overlapping, the filament can get stuck, causing a clog. What do I do if my Printer clogs? If your printer clogs, the best way to fix it is to power down the printer and remove the nozzle while cool. Once the nozzle is off, you can preheat the printer again. Once it reaches the max temp you have set for preheating, push the Bowden tube through the extruder, and the filament should come out. Be sure not to leave the Bowden tube in the hot end as it could burn it and cause it to harden, preventing the filament from running through smoothly. Remove the tube and carefully screw the nozzle back onto the extruder. Be very careful as this is still hot, but waiting to screw the nozzle on while cool is not recommended as a seal is created when the nozzle is screwed onto the extruder when heated. Once the nozzle is reattached, push the Bowden tube through to the nozzle as far as you can to ensure the filament is correctly delivered to the nozzle. Once this is done, You should be back to printing normally. What Temperature should I use? The temperature can vary on a lot of things. The printer you have, climate, PLA type, bed material, and even the brand of the PLA are all factors. Most PLA spools will come with a recommended temperature printed on the box. There are two temperatures you will need to set: the bed and the nozzle. The average temperature for the nozzle is 200 degrees celsius, and the bed should be around 60 celsius. These are the average temperatures for PLA on an Ender three-bed. Sometimes, if you have a glass bed, the temperatures may increase while printing potentially upp to 220 degrees Celsius. Of course, however, the main thing in 3D printing is trial and error. If you feel your print doesn't look good or isn't attaching to the bed well, one of the first things to change would be the temperature, as it can be the most significant cause of printing issues. Other times, it might be a sign you need an upgraded printer. Upgrading your 3D Printer One thing where 3D printers differ significantly from ordinary printers is their customizability. When you buy a standard paper printer, there isn't much room for upgrades or customization. With 3D printers, however, you can customize almost every aspect. And with the internet, you can download parts for the printer online and print them at home. However, home printing parts could lead to defects. If you're concerned about improper print parts, you can pick up official parts at Microcenter. A great piece to consider upgrading would be the bed. You can upgrade the default print bed to a glass bed, which will change how you print but allow for more high-quality prints. You can also add upgrades like laser engravers, auto-leveling kits, and even silent motherboards. One significant homemade upgrade is a remote 3D printing server. This allows you to control your 3D printer from anywhere and monitor prints with a camera. For a complete step-by-step guide, check out our How to create a remote 3D print server guide here! Tools to use when 3D Printing When you get into 3D printing, it is essential to have the right tools. At Microcenter, we sell an Inland 3D Printer Tool Kit (Pictured to the right) with all the tools you need for 3D printing. This tool kit comes with essential tools for cleaning and removing prints and performing maintenance on the printer. The biggest tool you will see, and arguably one of the most important is the scraper. This is used for removing prints from the bed of your printer and is especially helpful for ensuring that they're not damaged when your prints are removed. When removing prints with your hands, you can damage the print; however, with this, you can be confident your print will come out great! There are also four needles of different sizes to help clean the nozzle from clogs. If some filament is hardened and you need to poke something through the nozzle to remove it, these needles work great for that. Allen Wrenches are also included for tightening bolts on the printer to ensure it is secure and accessing other areas like behind the screen, the fan chasse, and more. This is not the only tool kit we carry, and you can get all of these tools separately if you prefer. However, this will make sure that you are ready for anything 3D printing has to throw at you! Ready to Print With the knowledge of the basics of 3D printing, you can now get started! The great thing about 3D printing is how vast it is. You can always get better with the different materials, printers, techniques, and models; 3D printing never gets old! You can always learn more and show your friends the new prints you made. Be prepared to keep on learning, and eventually, you will be able to print anything you need! Looking for more information about 3D Printing? We’ve got a 3D Printing Community, a whole section of 3D Printing How-Tos, as well as articles on How to Choose a 3D Printer, and an in-depth look at the differences between 3D Printer filaments. And if you can’t find what you’re looking for, don’t hesitate to post a new discussion and the Community will be happy to help! 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Categories 8K All Categories 1.2K The Blog 63 What's Trending 15 Past News and Updates 185 How to & Technical Guides 13 Computer Hardware 119 Software 3 Home Office 6 Networking 2 Audio/Visual 2 Home Automation 20 3D Printers 20 Maker 32 PC Build Guides 120 Reviews & Buying Guides 55 Build Showcase 27 Contests 48 Past Contests 1.6K The Community 1.9K General Discussion 105 New Members 248 Consumer Tech 68 Prebuilt PCs and Laptops 100 Software 8 Audio/Visual 27 Networking & Security 1 Home Automation 3 Digital Photography 3 Content Creators 22 Hobby Boards & Projects 33 3D Printing 69 Retro Arcade/Gaming 92 All Other Tech 1.6K Store Information and Policy 78 Off Topic 17 Community Ideas & Feedback 120 Your Completed Builds 2.9K Build-Your-Own PC 1.9K Help Choosing Parts 251 Graphics Cards 200 CPUs, Memory, and Motherboards 73 Cases and Power Supplies 23 Air and Liquid Cooling 26 Monitors and Displays 34 Peripherals 19 All Other Parts 29 Featured Categories We love seeing what our customers build Submit photos and a description of your PC to our build showcase Submit Now Looking for a little inspiration? See other custom PC builds and get some ideas for what can be done View Build Showcase View builds by: AMD Processors Intel Processors RTX 3090 RTX 3080 RTX 2080 Ti RTX 2080 Super RTX 2070 Super RTX 2070 RTX 2060 Super Radeon RX 5700XT Radeon RX 5700 Air Cooled Liquid Cooled SAME DAY CUSTOM BUILD SERVICE If You Can Dream it, We Can Build it. Services starting at $149.99 More Details Micro Center Homepage Desktops Laptops Computer Parts Computer Accessories Custom PC Builder Build Showcase Networking Electronics 3D Printing Service, Upgrades & Repairs Laptop Battery Replacement Laptop Screen Repair Virus and Malware Removal Hard Drive Recovery and Backup Apple MacBook Repair Custom Built PCs Schedule an Appointment © Vanilla Foundation Theme 2022 Powered By Vanilla Community Article Inland PLA+ Spooless — Micro Center Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker {$smarty.capture.menu} Activity Categories Discussions Computers Computer Parts Custom PC Builder DIY/ Maker Home › General Discussion Inland PLA+ Spooless Poppinfreshzero ✭ January 2021 edited June 2021 in General Discussion Hello I have recently had a few online orders of Inland PLA+ Spooless cancelled. I was wondering if the shortage was temporary or if this item is being discontinued? Currently, there is no Micro Center near me. So, online ordering is my only choice. Thank you 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Comments LandShark admin January 2021 Hello @Poppinfreshzero I'm not certain of the specifics for your order, but I'd be happy to check in on this for you! What item or SKU were you specifically interested in? Also what quantity were you interested in? Thanks! 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Poppinfreshzero ✭ January 2021 Hello! I appreciate the help! Here the SKUs I've been trying to order: SKU: 803973 SKU: 803981 SKU: 804393 SKU: 803882 I have ordered 5 of the black that were cancelled and then 5 of the white that were cancelled. I have ordered 5 blue and they have just shipped! I really like this filament and the reason I inquire is, primarily, because I have an Etsy store and would like to use this PLA. I wanted to make sure that it was going to be in stock for the foreseeable future (I understand shortages will happen). Thank you again! 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook TSTDavey admin January 2021 @Poppinfreshzero where going to email you with some questions. We'll need to know what city and state you are in. This forum is public so we'll ask you via email. We need to see which warehouse you near to check the inventory on the PLA filament. 1 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Poppinfreshzero ✭ January 2021 I have received the email and wanted to, publicly, thank you for the great service so far! I really appreciate the help! 2 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Josparky ✭ April 2021 I would like to know this as well. Sad day if they are not going to sell this any longer the pla+ brand they have been selling is good stuff. I need to get some more as well for my orders. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook TSTDavey admin April 2021 @Josparky just chiming, Enter each SKU# below on the Microcenter.com website and different Filament Spooless should come up if its in stock. Sku# 803981 Sku# 803973 Sku# 804393 Sku#803882 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook dlyness0321 ✭ April 2021 It says the filament is in store only. Is this just a temporary solution? I live nowhere near a microcenter and losing this brand would really be a blow! 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook TSTDavey admin April 2021 @dlyness0321 unfortunately its in-store only. Amazon or Newegg may have the filament. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook dlyness0321 ✭ April 2021 @TSTDavey will they ever come back to online ordering? I just ordered a bunch of the empty spools so I could refill them so it's kinda a bummer if I'll never get them anymore 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Ian admin April 2021 edited April 2021 https://community.microcenter.com/discussion/comment/31271#Comment_31271 I am sorry, we would not be sure on this, any updates to shipping availability would be reflected on the product page on our website. 0 · Share on TwitterShare on Facebook Categories 8K All Categories 1.2K The Blog 63 What's Trending 15 Past News and Updates 185 How to & Technical Guides 13 Computer Hardware 119 Software 3 Home Office 6 Networking 2 Audio/Visual 2 Home Automation 20 3D Printers 20 Maker 32 PC Build Guides 120 Reviews & Buying Guides 55 Build Showcase 27 Contests 48 Past Contests 1.6K The Community 1.9K General Discussion 105 New Members 248 Consumer Tech 68 Prebuilt PCs and Laptops 100 Software 8 Audio/Visual 27 Networking & Security 1 Home Automation 3 Digital Photography 3 Content Creators 22 Hobby Boards & Projects 33 3D Printing 69 Retro Arcade/Gaming 92 All Other Tech 1.6K Store Information and Policy 78 Off Topic 17 Community Ideas & Feedback 120 Your Completed Builds 2.9K Build-Your-Own PC 1.9K Help Choosing Parts 251 Graphics Cards 200 CPUs, Memory, and Motherboards 73 Cases and Power Supplies 23 Air and Liquid Cooling 26 Monitors and Displays 34 Peripherals 19 All Other Parts 29 Featured Categories We love seeing what our customers build Submit photos and a description of your PC to our build showcase Submit Now Looking for a little inspiration? See other custom PC builds and get some ideas for what can be done View Build Showcase View builds by: AMD Processors Intel Processors RTX 3090 RTX 3080 RTX 2080 Ti RTX 2080 Super RTX 2070 Super RTX 2070 RTX 2060 Super Radeon RX 5700XT Radeon RX 5700 Air Cooled Liquid Cooled SAME DAY CUSTOM BUILD SERVICE If You Can Dream it, We Can Build it. Services starting at $149.99 More Details Micro Center Homepage Desktops Laptops Computer Parts Computer Accessories Custom PC Builder Build Showcase Networking Electronics 3D Printing Service, Upgrades & Repairs Laptop Battery Replacement Laptop Screen Repair Virus and Malware Removal Hard Drive Recovery and Backup Apple MacBook Repair Custom Built PCs Schedule an Appointment © Vanilla Foundation Theme 2022 Powered By Vanilla